Fear and Denial By Pepón Osorio

Fear and Denial
Photo By Gail

One of the foremost installation artists working today, Pepón Osorio here presents two cats wearing medallions that say, respectively, fear and denial. These oversize domestic animals (their scale accentuated by the small table they sit on) may say something about the exaggerated role that our fears and denials play within our own imaginations.

Photographed at the Brooklyn Museum.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Peter Blume, Light of the World

Light of The World
Photo By Gail

Peter Blume’s Light of the World (1932) delivers an allegorical critique of modernity and the unquestioning embrace of progress. The four figures are transfixed by the bright light of a fantastical lamp whose brilliance contrasts with the darkening sky overtaking a cathedral based on Notre Dame in Paris – a juxtaposition implying that the faith once reflected in Gothic architecture’s soaring spires had been transferred to modern technologies. Blume identified the mustachioed figure as a ventriloquist’s dummy – his personal symbol for the voiceless and impotent American worker – another hint of the societal pressures that keep us in thrall to technological progress, often against our best interests.

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

RIP Yes Bassist Chris Squire

Chris Squire With Bass
Image Source

Ultimate Classic Rock reports that Chris Squire, legendary Bass player for the progressive rock band Yes has died (June 28th) after a battle with Leukemia. He was 67 years old. This kills me, as Squire was one of my rock heroes and my favorite bass player ever, followed by John Entwistle and Dennis Dunaway of Alice Cooper. Not only was Squire a phenomenally innovative bass player, but he was also one of the first bassists to release a solo album (1975’s Fish Out of Water) on which the bass is played as a lead instrument with no other guitars appearing on the record.

Fish Out of Water Chris Squire

All you have to do is listen to the lead track on that album, “Hold Out Your Hand” — a song that I would put up against the best of Yes’s entire catalog — to have your mind completely blown. Chris Squire was a true Rock God. Both his contributions, as well as the loss of his talent, to the world of Rock music, is immeasurable.

Video Clip of The Week: Tijuana Panthers, “Front Window Down”



Making an appearance here on The Gig’s Video Clip of the Week for an unprecedented THIRD TIME (Woo!), Long Beach rock trio Tijuana Panthers serendipitously capture both the elation of the beginning of summertime, and the sweet melancholy of summer’s end, in their latest video for the sublime tune, “Front Window Down. I love this band.

Visually, this is a fun, no frills clip of the band “performing” a small living room, with super-imposed images of bassist/lead singer Daniel Michicoff rocking out on the vocals, sometimes with a cigarette nonchalantly dangling from the corner of his mouth. A wash of jangly, surf rock guitars buttressed by a viscerally sludgy bassline, this exuberant burst of aural energy takes me back to the surf-garage rock revival of late ’70s / early ’80s California, and it’s all good. “Front Window Down”comes from the band’s upcoming fourth album, Poster, which, perhaps appropriately, will arrive on August 28th (via Innovative Leisure), right in time to reflect on this summer and summers past. Enjoy!

Tijuana Panthers Press Photo 2015

Cost of Living (Aleyda) By Josh Kline

Cost of Living (Aleyda)
All Photos By Gail

To make Cost of Living (2014) and other works in this series,  Josh Kline interviewed workers – janitorial staff and package delivers – and then made casts  of their body parts that they used to complete their daily tasks. In this case, he spoke with the housekeeper named Aleyda,  who worked at the Rivington Hotel.

Cost of Living (Aleyda)

The artist created each element of the sculptural assemblage using a 3-D printer. The results call attention to the laboring bodies of  an often invisible work force, and offer a grim reminder that these workers’ humanity is often valued less than the tools they use to complete their job. Cost of Living (Aleyda) reflects what the artist has described as “the relentless push to squeeze more productivity out of workers – turning  people into reliable, always–on office appliances.”

Cost of Living (Aleyda)

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan.

Georges Seurat, Study for A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte

A Sunday on La Grande Jatte,
Photo By Gail

OK, everybody recognizes the painting above, which is called A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, by French Post-Impressionist painter Georges Seurat, from the movie Ferris Buellers Day Off: that much we can agree on. However, this is not that actual painting but, rather, it is a study, or a sort of trial run of the finished painting. Even though it looks very much like the painting that Cameron stared at for ages during their visit to the Art Institute of Chicago in Ferris Buellers Day Off, it is not that painting.

In fact, this isn’t even the only study that Seurat created for A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, which he worked over the course of two years (1884 – 1886). Focusing meticulously on the landscape of the park, Seurat reworked the original, as well as completed numerous preliminary drawings and oil sketches.  He spent hours in the park creating numerous sketches of the various figures in order to perfect their form. He concentrated on the issues of color, light, and form. The finished painting is approximately 7 by 10 feet in size.

Wikipedia also offers that, “Inspired by optical effects and perception inherent in the color theories of Michel Eugène Chevreul, Ogden Rood and others, Seurat adapted this scientific research to his painting. He contrasted miniature dots or small brushstrokes of colors that when unified optically in the human eye were perceived as a single shade or hue. He believed that this form of painting, called divisionism at the time but now known as pointillism, would make the colors more brilliant and powerful than standard brush strokes. The use of dots of almost uniform size came in the second year of his work on the painting, 1885–86. To make the experience of the painting even more vivid, he surrounded it with a frame of painted dots, which in turn he enclosed with a pure white, wooden frame, which is how the painting is exhibited today at the Art Institute of Chicago.

This photograph of the study for A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte was taken at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Hair Metal Salon, Williamsburg

Hair Metal Salon
Photo By Gail

Hair Metal is the best name for a Hair Salon that I’ve seen since Curl Up and Dye, and they appear to have pretty great reviews on Yelp as well! We especially love the open scissors used in the Skull and Cross Bones logo. Metal!

Hair Metal is officially located at 578 Driggs Ave. but its really on North 6th Street between Bedford and Driggs, in Williamsburg Brooklyn, NY 11211.