Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Snow!

pink snow photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

When Winter Storm Gail hit the tri-state area in mid-December, people joked with me that the storm would surely bring with it some Pink Snow — because it shared my name, and everyone knows how much I love anything pink. Well, surprise (or not) — while exploring the neighborhood on the morning after the storm, I actually encountered Pink Snow!

pink snow on ave b photo by gail worley

The mysterious pink slush (which is what it had become by this point in the day) was found at the intersection of Avenue B and 9th Street, adjacent to a highly-trafficked bodega. I have no idea where the pink color came from, but I am glad I was lucky enough to document it before it melted and swirled down into the sewer and out to sea!

pink snow on ave b photo by gail worley
Pink Snow, Bitches!

Koi Fish Stencil Art By Jeremy Novy

sidewalk koi stencil art photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

This cool Koi Fish stencil art is one of the better-known images in the ouvre of California-based Street Artist/Activist Jeremy Novy. There was a larger Koi Fish piece in Freeman Alley a while back but it got obliterated by foot-traffic before I had the chance to see it, so it was a nice surprise to find this when I was walking home from Pearl River Mart this past November. See more of Novy’s art by following him on Instagram.

sidewalk koi stencil art jeremy novy photo by gail worley

Photographed on Walker Street, Just East of Broadway, in Chinatown, NYC.

Eye On Design: Red Chiffon and Organza Gown By Brandon Maxwell

brandon maxwell red gown photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

New York’s Museum of Natural History always has one or two special exhibits that require purchase of an extra ticket above the standard price of admission, but that’s because they are worth it. One of the museum’s current special exhibits is called The Nature of Color, and it is just fantastic. The exhibit is immersive and contains many different galleries and rooms. For example, the Red Room highlights how the color red can mean status, power, and fertility while simultaneously representing sports teams, political parties, and religions.  The centerpiece of this room is a flowing Red Silk Chiffon and Organza Gown created especially for the The Nature of Color by fashion designer Brandon Maxwell.

red gown by brandon maxwell photo by gail worley

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Product Review: Pink Panda Low Sugar Candy

pink panda candy packages photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Did you overindulge a bit more that usual during the holiday season? Join the club. It would be nice if Holidays-in-lockdown meant that there are no rules, and you can eat whatever you want, but if you’ve made a New Year’s Resolution to curb your consumption of sweets treats, there’s a new candy in town called Pink Panda that can help you snack guilt-free.

sweet things photo by gail worley

Pink Panda is a line of gummy candy that lets you give in to the sweet desires of your inner child while also satisfying your responsible adult brain that says snacks should be healthy whenever possible. Made with 90% less sugar than regular candy (only 2g per bag), there is no sacrifice made the it comes to quality and taste. We received bags of both the Treasure Chews and Astro Blasters varieties for review. Read on for our findings!

astro blasters close up photo by gail worley

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Raúl Lozza, Relief No. 30

raul lozza relief no 30 photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

In works such as Relief No. 30 (1946), Raúl Lozza fragmented the surface of painting into discrete parts — usually, irregular geometric shapes — that he fixed in a particular configuration with connecting rods. Known as Coplanals, these constructions are placed directly onto the wall without any framing mechanism. The empty space in between their shapes thus becomes a part of the work.

Lozza investigated the possibilities of the coplanal for years, founding the Perceptismo group with his brothers. They developed a mathematical approach to painting that focused on the relationship between the wall and the coplanal’s dimensions and colors.

Photographed the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Bunny Storage Ottoman

pink bunny storage bin photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

I originally took this photo of a giant paper mache (guessing) Pink Bunny Storage Ottoman (guessing again) at a NY Now gift show in August of 2019. I found it in my photo archives while digging around for a pink thing to post this week. How fortunate.

pink bunny storage bin photo by gail worley

You can see it is rather big, so it would probably be a great addition to a child’s bedroom or playroom, as the back has a removable “lid” and I am sure you could store lots of toys and kid’s crap (or even linen) inside it.  It’s pretty cute, definitely unique and also quite practical. Although I neglected to note the vendor, I did a search for “paper mache animal heads” and found this site, where I immediately recognized the Rainbow Striped Cow Head in the background.  I have no idea if that is the correct vendor, but if you want to have a hand at doing some research Googling on your own, please leave any information in the comments.

Happy New Year and Good Riddance to 2020

pink rose at nybg photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

This is one of my favorite photos taken during an August visit to the New York Botanical Garden shortly after it reopened post-lockdown. 2020 was a hard year, but I like to think that it made me a stronger, more resourceful, more appreciative and more compassionate individual.  I thank you for your readership and support of the blog this year, and I hope that you have at least a few precious memories of 2020 as we welcome and look forward to 2021, where things can only get better. Cheers!

Beauty in Banality: The Art of Jennifer Small

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All Images Courtesy of Robert Berry Gallery

Since the Chelsea galleries reopened a few months ago, there has not been much on exhibit that has compelled me to leave my house in order to see the art in person. I felt differently, however, when I received an email announcing an exhibit of new paintings from Wilmington, DE-based painter Jennifer Small. As soon as I saw her bold and colorful canvases featuring abstract shapes and patterns, they reminded me of the shaped, sculptural paintings by Beverly Fishman as well as the furniture designs of Shiro Kuramata. It delighted me to imagine what a line of art furniture from the mind of this artist might look like. I wanted to see these paintings in person right away. Sadly, I was informed that the show was viewable online only, but gallerist Robert Berry was kind enough ask Jennifer for a statement about her work exclusively for this post. Sweet.

jennifer small work detail
Detail of Work from Above Photo

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Beauty in Banality is about seeing everyday routine as an opportunity to absorb visual curiosities in situations or places that are often overlooked,” Jennifer explains. “I use abstraction to elevate these glimpses of ordinary environments into bold, engaging compositions that can live in a white cube gallery space but are still approachable and relatable because they are grounded in observations of common things.” It’s nice to know that I am not alone in having taken inspiration from my post-lockdown neighborhood walks.

jennifer small art 2xx

“The majority of the paintings in Beauty in Banality were made since the Covid-19 lockdown this past year,” she continues. “I was inspired by walking my dog around the block, witnessing caution tape around playgrounds and abandoned soccer fields. My paintings become a visual diary of my movements in a specific time and place.”

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Suggestive of the works of Thomas Nozkowski, Richard Diebenkorn’s Ocean Park Series, and Wendy White, Small’s work often features a major focal point, as well as secondary items, creating visual interest with neutral areas juxtaposed with detailed patterning. Find out more about Jennifer Small, and see all of the fourteen works featured in the Beauty of Banality series, through January 10th 2021, by visiting  the Robert Berry Gallery.

Eye On Design: Washington Skeleton Side Chair By David Adjaye

washington skeleton side chair photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

The Metropolitan Museum of Art does not often invite visitors to sit directly on the art, but they have made an exception for these Washington Skeleton Side Chairs (2013), designed by Ghanaian-British architect David Adjaye, which can be found in the gallery where the 2020 Holiday Tree is on display.

washington skeleton side chair photo by gail worley

These delicately balanced, precisely engineered chairs emerged from the design process for the façade of the National Museum of African-American History and Culture, which opened in Washington DC in 2016.  David Adjaye developed an intricate lattice form that was an investigation of the geometry, materiality, light and shadow.

washington skeleton side chair detail photo by gail worley

Both functional in its shading role, and poetic in its abstract visual qualities, this screen borrowed from African design patterns but also paid homage to the history of enslaved blacksmiths and their ironwork for ornamental gates in southern cities such as New Orleans and Charleston.

washington skeleton side chair photo by gail worley

Utilizing the smaller scale of furniture as an agile testing ground for these architectural ideas, Adjaye produced what he describes as a “narrative about skin, form and structure.“ Here, he shapes the skeletal, ribbed surfaces to mimic the form of a seated person, resulting in a cantilevered, ergonomic silhouette that almost disappears when in use. Made of die-cast aluminum, then powder coated and copper plated, the chairs are manufactured by Knoll International.

washington skeleton side chair photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

washington skeleton side chair photo by gail worley

Product Review: Elyptol Natural Cleaning Wipes

elyptol wipes package photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

In this modern Covid life that we live, do you find that your hands are perpetually red and chapped from constant washing, as well as endlessly wiping down counters and household surfaces with disinfectant wipes that can dry your skin even further? Not to mention, but you can see I am about to, the fact that for many months wipes were difficult, if not impossible, to even find on the shelves. I think we can all relate to the intimate new relationship that we have with disinfectant wipes; a product that, prior to March of 2020, I will confess to having purchased maybe once or twice in my entire life. Just being serious.

Now that wipes of all sorts are back in-stock in most stores, it’s nice to have the option of using a brand made with natural ingredients that are also gentler on your skin.  Elyptol, makers of multi-use cleaning essentials, has just launched its all-natural cleaning wipes in Target stores nationwide and on Target.com.  I recently received a package of Elyptol Natural Cleaning Wipes for use here in the Chickpad so that I can let you know how they work. Here are my findings.

elyptol wipes lid removal photo by gail worley

Before you can start using the wipes, you will a need short tutorial (not provided on the container, but provided here by me) on how to remove the lid  (which surprisingly neither twists off nor pops off easily) from the Elyptol Wipes container. First, get a large spoon from the kitchen, turn the container on its side, and nudge the edge the spoon’s bowl underneath the rim of the lid, then push the lid up and off.

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