Video Clip of The Week: Daisy Jopling, “Country Hope”


In this time of darkness, it is important to always be moving towards the light. I’m very happy to share with you this week’s Video Clip, the uplifting and inspirational “Country Hope,” from violinist Daisy Jopling, who is joined here by a chorus of contributing female vocalists. Blending soft rock, modern classical, and lite country genres, “Country Hope” is both soothing and anthemic simultaneously; harnessing the momentum of the recent Women’s marches, remdinding us lyrically that “We Have It All,” and the power to shape our reality is within us. As a side note, if you live in an area that got pummeled by last week’s blizzard, you will surely also appreciate the conjuring of springtime and creative rebirth evoked by this gorgeous video, which is shot entirely outdoors.

For those in the NYC area, Jopling will perform music from her just-release album, The Awakening (her first album of original compositions), at Manhattan’s Cutting Room on Friday, February 18th, 2017 with a 7:30 PM set time. In concert, Jopling often switches between a 1778 Antonio Gragnani violin and her Yamaha electric violin, which sounds exciting! I can remember seeing violinist Lili Haydn open for Page and Plant at Madison Square Garden many years ago now, and she blew my mind, so this show should be pretty cool. The Awakening is now available on the Fleur De Son Classics label, as the first crossover signing on this classical music label’s roster. Enjoy!

daisy-jopling-awakening-cd-art

Advertisements

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Mannequin Bust

Pink Mannequin Bust
Photo By Gail

What’s most interesting about this Hot Pink bust of a lovely African American lady, is that it’s not in use as your standard display mannequin, despite the fact that it is clearly in the middle of a clothing section of a department store. In this instance, it is really more like a sculpture; more like  a work of art meant to enhance the consumer’s shopping experience, I think. In my case, it was highly effective.

Photographed at Saks Fifth Avenue, The Gardens on El Paseo, Palm Desert, California.

Shark Attack Backpack!

Shark Attack Backpack
Photos By Gail

I spotted this adorable Shark Backpack for kids at the Gift Show at Javits Center this past weekend. The tag say it’s by Jack And Friends, a company that also makes super soft and cuddly animal blankets for Babies. You could probably find this wherever their other times are sold. So cute!

Shark Attack Backpack
Look Out, He’s Right Behind You!

Save

Save

Charlie Watts’ Ludwig Drumkit Circa 1965

Charlie Watts Drumkit Front
All Photos By Gail

If you’ve already been to the absolutely phenomenal Rolling Stones ‘ career retrospective, Exhibitionism (which, go!), you may recognize this drumkit belonging to drummer Charlie Watts, which is on display in the recording gallery. This 1965, 4-piece  Ludwig  kit in a Sky Blue Pearl shell finish with a keystone badge (indicating a drum made in the 1960s), was used from 1965 -to mid-1968 by Watts on most of the band’s studio recordings and live performances.

Charlie Watts Drumkit Side

Watts remembers that, “Everyone in the early ‘60s wanted Ludwig, so I got mine from the same place Ringo [Starr] got this, I think, which was Drum City, in Shaftesbury Avenue. Ringo’s was dark grey pearl and mine was sky blue – very camp.”

Exhibitionism continues through March 12th, 2017 at Industria, Located at West 12th and Washington Streets in the Meat Packing District. Visit This Link Tickets and More Information!

Charlie Watts Drumkit Read

Eye On Design: Glass Armchair by Shiro Kuramata

Glass Armchair
Photographed By Gail in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum

In the mid-to-late 20th century, an atmosphere of innovation and a desire to question the tenets of modernism led some designers to explore a variety of ways in which to shape space. American Architect and Designer Alexander Hayden Girard utilized color and pattern in textiles, particularly in this colorful abstract, or folk art-inspired work for Herman Miller.

Glass Armchair at Albertz Benda
Photographed at Albertz Benda Gallery

By 1970, Japanese Architect and Interior Designer  Shiro Kuramata (1934 – 1991) was introducing alternative materials such as acrylic and industrial plate glass into his furniture. Utilizing a newly developed adhesive, Kuramata achieved material and visual minimalism with this Glass Armchair (1976). Flat planes of glass are bonded together along their edges, without mounts or screws, to create a functional chair that seems simultaneously visible and invisible. The transparent form invites users to question notions of materiality, utility and comfort.

Yes, It Exists: Skull Sweater for Dogs

Skull Sweater
All Photos By Gail

Nothing says “I am a badass, and so is my dog” like this fuckin’ Dog Sweater with a Skull on it. Available for $45 at Saks Fifth Avenue, The Gardens on El Paseo, Palm Desert, California.

Skull Sweater on Toy Dog
Skull Sweater Displayed on Toy Dog Model

Modern Art Monday Presents: Kay Kurt, Hallelujah

Hallelujah 1995 - 2016
Photo By Gail

Kay Kurt (b. 1944) is a New Realist painter of large-scale confections. Her candies lay the foundation of her compositions, structuring her canvases abstractly, and freeing her to meditate on content. As Richard Hamilton, Robert Watts and Claes Oldenburg also used candies as subject matter — and she often enlarges the scale tenfold, like a billboard — Kurt’s work became associated with Pop Art early on. The scale of the Pop Art movement opened Kurt’s eyes to the possibility of a new vision based on objects instead of landscape.

Typical candies featured in her body of work include Licorice, Bon Bons, Jordan Almonds, Jujubes and Gummi Bears. She chooses and collects these candies from various countries, being specifically interested in those of German origin, which reflect the values, attitudes, and cultures associated with the people who produce them. She does not used mediated or advertising images like the Pop Artists, nor photographs like the Photorealists. These paintings are developed through observation. Kurt prefers painting generic-looking candy, as the luxurious ones are too refined for her taste. The sole instance of exquisite candy in her oeuvre is a Godiva chocolate box painting that she made for a friend. Her choice of subject reflects her interest in mass production and consumer culture around the world.

Compulsive and exacting to an extreme, Kurt can take years to complete a canvas. As the 1980s progressed, Kurt gradually found herself excluded from the New York art world where she had found acclaim for over a decade. Although never giving up on her painting practice, she almost completely withdrew from the public eye and it was not until her inclusion in the 2010 traveling exhibition, Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists, 1958-1968 presented at the Brooklyn Museum, that her work was re-introduced.

Hallelujah (1995-2016) is part of the exhibit Kay Kurt: For All Her Innocent Airs, She Knew Exactly Where She Was Going, on view through February 16th, 2017 at Albertz Benda Gallery, Located at 515 West 26th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.