Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Fish Chinese Kite

Pink Fish Kite
Photos By Gail

I saw this fun Fish Kite for sale at Pearl River Mart in Chinatown! Imagine how beautiful it would look flying in the sky!

Pink Fish Kite


Rabbit Tile Mosaic By Invader at The Standard Hotel, Meatpacking District

Invader Rabbit
Photos By Gail

Spotted this guy adjacent to the Skating Rink right outside the Standard Hotel on Washington Street in the Meatpacking District, NYC.

Invader Rabbit

Eye On Design: Menorah #7 By Peter Shire

Menorah #7 By Peter Shire
All Photos By Gail

In the 1980s, Judaica artists began to reexamine the form of the Hanukkah lamp, which according to rabbinical prescription should have eight lights in a straight row and on the same level, with a ninth set off from them.  Peter Shire (b. 1947) typically takes familiar objects and reimagines their shapes, colors and materials so that we barely recognize them.

Menorah #7 By Peter Shire

In his Menorah #7  (1986), a mixture of pastel and hot colors, industrial metals and a cantilevered, swirling arrangement of parts  challenge the modernist aesthetic of simplicity that had dominated design for a century. This post-modernism was a key design principe of the Memphis Design Group to which Shire belonged.

Menorah #7 By Peter Shire

Photographed in The Jewish Museum in Manhattan.

Stations of The Cross: Station 13 at Trinity Church

Station of The Cross #13
Photo By Gail

Stations of the Cross is a public art project, weaving through 14 religious and secular art spaces from The Cloisters museum to the Cathedral of St. John the Divine to Trinity Church and the 9/11 Memorial. The series breaks open the journey of Jesus, inviting people of all faiths to consider injustice across the human experience with a focus on the plight of immigrants and refugees. Station 13, Jesus is Taken Down From the Cross, is realized in Stations, 2016-18 by G. Roland Biermann, which can be found at the side courtyard between Trinity Church and Cemetery at Broadway and Wall Street in the financial district.

Station of The Cross #13

Sleek minimalism and gritty reality are seen in Biermann’s sculpture, in which two guardrails slice through the air, forming a fallen cross. Jesus‘ deposition finds a contemporary echo in the everyday tragedy of a car crash. Oil barrels suggest automobiles, but we might also think of olive oil, used in the Bible to anoint priests and cure the sick. Painted 14 shades of red — suggesting blood that runs, congeals, and quickens anew — the barrels evoke the Stations of The Cross as a whole. There might be consolation in the symbolism of Holy Blood and Holy Oil. Alternatively, we might think about the blood spilt in the pursuit of fossil fuels: our eagerness to import barrels of crude from the Middle East but unwillingness to accept refugees from that region. This sculpture is equal parts sacred and profane, ancient and contemporary.

Stations of the Cross Runs through Easter Sunday, April 1st, 2018. Visit a map of all fourteen installations, and plan your own journey at This Link.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Agnes Pelton, Sea Change

Agnes Pelton Sea Change
Photo By Gail

The forms of Agnes Pelton’s Sea Change (1931) channel the movement and energy of water, which the artist regarded as a metaphor for the ebb and flow of human thought. Created the year she left Long Island for the Southern California desert, Sea Change can be understood as a meditation on personal transitions; however, Pelton refused such specific readings of her art. Influenced by modern Theosophy, an esoteric blend of religion and philosophy, as well as the mysticism of the American Symbolist painters, Pelton believed that art channels the universal energies of the natural world through color and light, which are experienced rather than purely seen. She described color as “active,” likening it to a voice or “vibration” that is ideally perceived like “the fragrance of a flower [which] fills the consciousness with the essence of its life.”

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

Video Clip of The Week: IAMX, “Stardust”

Making his impressive debut in the Video Clip of The Week this Sunday is Chris Corner’s IAMX, with the Performance Art-oriented clip for the track “Stardust.” Featuring celebrity tattoo artist Kat Von D, this clip captures everything that makes the gothic/industrial scene so mesmerizing, while managing to keep this much-fetishized genre (which arguably, saw its commercial peak in the late 90s) fresh and intriguing. Mostly, it reminds me of my club days, when NYC venues like The Bank and Limelight were the places to go to dance yourself silly from midnight to dawn while communing with the other creatures of the night. Good times.

“Stardust” can be found on IAMX‘s recently released album, Alive In New Light. Recommended if You Like: Nine Inch Nails, Goldfrapp, Sisters of Mercy. Spring Tour Dates are below! Watch the uncensored clip at This Link. Enjoy!

IAMX Alive In New Light Cover


4/19 Washington, DC @Rock&Roll Hotel
4/21 Brooklyn, NYC @Rough Trade (with Kat Von D)
4/22 Brooklyn, NYC @Rough Trade (with Kat Von D)
4/24 Boston, MA @Middle East
4/26 Montreal, QB @Le Belmont
4/27 Toronto, ON @Lee’s Palace
4/28 Chicago, IL @Bottom Lounge
4/30 Denver, CO @Bluebird Theatre
5/1 Salt Lake City, UT @Metro Music Hall
5/3 Vancouver, BC @Biltmore Cabaret
5/4 Seattle, WA @The Crocodile
5/5 Portland, OR @Aladdin
5/7 San Francisco, CA @Great American Music Hall (with Kat Von D)
5/9 Los Angeles, CA @Fonda Theater (with Kat Von D)
5/23 Guadalajara, MEX @C3 Stage
5/24 Mexico City, MEX @Lunario


Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Melitta Heritage Series Coffeemaker

Pink Melitta Pour Over Coffee Maker
All Photos By Gail

Oh, how I love a modern product whose design riffs on a retro look! I spotted this adorable (and practical!) Melitta Heritage Series Pour-Over Coffeemaker at the recent IHA Show, and was instantly smitten: not only with its millennial Pink color, but also by the vintage glazed porcelain design! Wow!

Pink Melitta Pour Over Coffee Maker

It makes perfect sense that this design is from the brand’s new Heritage Collection. While Melitta is a well-known brand that many of us have grown up with, I didn’t know anything about the company’s engaging backstory! In 1908, German housewife Melitta Bentz invented the world’s first pour-over coffeemaker when she poked holes in the bottom of a brass cup and lined it with a sheet of her son’s blotting paper (the first coffee filter)! The pour-over method that we take for granted, which results in rich, flavorful handcrafted coffee, came to be because a smart lady came up with an on-the-fly solution to effortlessly make coffee more delicious!

Pink Melitta Pour Over Coffee Maker

Melitta’s Heritage Series Pour-Over Coffeemaker Set includes a porcelain Pour-Over cone and matching 20 once carafe. The design debuted at IHA and is available in stores now.