Tag Archive | Design

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Calavera “Skull” Chair!

Calavera Chair
All Photos By Gail

Spotted at ICFF 2017: What could be more perfectly predestined  for this blog than a Pink Skull Chair! Swoon! What makes this design even more special is that it is the second appearance on The Gig of a Flocked Skull! Manufactured by Polart, the company uses a special technique to electrostatically adhere the flock to its products, resulting in a texture that is soft like velvet to the touch. Appropriately, the collection (which includes other designs) is known as Flockart.

3 Calavera Chairs

The Calavera Chair is the first piece of a collection inspired by Mexico’s heritage and its most recognized holiday, Dia de los Muertos, the holiday to honor the dead. Calavera, which translates in English as a human skull, is a the ideal name for the chair depicted as a giant skull and decorated with ornate details — such as the crown which serves as the chair’s back support — to represent Dia de los Muertos. Calavera is constructed of polyurethane, steel and a choice of fabric.

Calavera Chair 2
A Soft Cush for Your Tush

The Calavera Chair design is the first collaboration with a furniture company for designer Dirk Vermeire, whose background as an artist is rooted in his Flemish culture. His works have been presented at high profile art shows across the globe, including Art Basel. Vermeire currently resides between Ghent, Belgium, and Marbella, Spain, where his Plexiglas studio is located.

The Flockart collection will be produced in both indoor and outdoor options and will be available in the brand’s 20 signature bold colors and durable materials. The Calavera Chair is priced to retail at $719 for the outdoor version and $599 for interior designs.

3 Calavera Chairs Installation View

Advertisements

Eye On Design: Ribbon Chair By Pierre Paulin

Ribbon Chair
All Photos By Gail

Mushrooms, oysters, tongues, and tulips are some of the iconic shapes French designer Pierre Paulin (1927 – 2009) was best known for creating. Having trained under Parisian designer Marcel Gascion, Paulin was influenced by the Scandinavian aesthetic as well as American pre-fabricated designs by Charles and Ray Eames and Florence Knoll.

Inspired to develop his own brand of accessible luxury, Paulin began designing and manufacturing seats made of molded wood lined with foam padding and fashioned with a stretch elastic jersey fabric for Thonet-France. Paulin’s forward-looking, innovative designs for affordable chairs, divans, and sofas in an array of bright and vivid colors, most notably the Mushroom, Tongue and Ribbon chair, among others, can be found in contemporary art and design collections around the world.

Pierre Paulin Chairs
Tongue Chairs and Ribbon Chair (Rear)

Paulin designed his Ribbon Chair (model 582) in 1966, for manufacture in 1967 by Artifort in the Netherlands. It involves a tubular steel frame, latex foam, stretch fabric and a painted wood base.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Malitte Lounge Furniture By Roberto Matta

Malitte Lounge Furniture
Photo By Gail

Primarily known as a painter and architect, Roberto Matta (1911 – 2002) designed his Malitte Lounge Furniture in 1966. This colorful collection of polyurethane foam shapes (manufactured by Gavina, Italy) could be stacked into a rectangular wall or used as individual pieces of seating. The round, center piece serves as a table. The design is playful and flexible, Its interlocking organic shapes reflect Mattas training as an architect in his native Chile, as well as his Surrealist painting practice, which developed after his move to Paris.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Malitte Seating System

Artist Gary Baseman Designs Collectible Doc Martens

Gary Baseman Doc Marten Signage
All Photos By Gail

Dr. Martens has partnered with LA-based artist, Gary Baseman, to design collectible, limited editions of Doc Martens footwear, featuring Baseman’s popular characters, Toby and Hot Chachacha. Sweet.

Gary Baseman Doc Marten Side 1

Here you can see a bespoke, punk version of Toby frolicking on this yellow boot.

Gary Baseman Doc Marten Side 2

These boots kick so much ass.

Gary Baseman Loafer

Baseman has also designed a shoe featuring the Hieronymus Bosch-influenced devilish imp, Hot Chachacha.

There are also Baseman-designed T-Shirts to match the shoes.

Toby the Punk and Hot Chachacha Doc Martens were spotted at The Dr. Martens Store, Located at 193 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211.

Eye On Design: Apple Jack Ladder By Karen Kjaegaard

Apple Jack Ladder
Photo By Gail

If you happen to be lucky enough to visit the Danish city of Copenhagen, don’t miss your chance to make a very fun visit to their fantastic Designmuseum, which is where I saw this super modern ladder designed by Karen Kjaegaard. The space-saving, bright red lacquered Apple Jack Ladder was part of Kjaegaard’s My Private Garden exhibit, which took place at the Designmuseum in 2005. The ladder is manufactured by Trip Trap. Read more about the My Private Garden exhibit at This Link!

Moholy-Nagy: Future Present at the Guggenheim NY

Moholy-Nagy Three Globes
All Photos By Gail. All Text By The Guggenheim Museum

László Moholy-Nagy (b. 1895, Borsód, Austria-Hungary; d. 1946, Chicago) believed in the potential of art as a vehicle for social transformation, working hand in hand with technology for the betterment of humanity. A restless innovator, Moholy-Nagy experimented with a wide variety of mediums, moving fluidly between the fine and applied arts in pursuit of his quest to illuminate the interrelatedness of life, art, and technology. An artist, educator, and writer who defied categorization, he expressed his theories in numerous influential writings that continue to inspire artists and designers today.

Moholy-Nagy 4 Pictures

Moholy-Nagy Plastic Form

Walter Gropius invited him to join the faculty at the Bauhaus school of art and design, where Moholy-Nagy taught in Weimar and Dessau in the 1920s. In 1937, he was appointed to head the New Bauhaus in Chicago; he later opened his own School of Design there (subsequently renamed the Institute of Design), which today is part of the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Moholy-Nagy

Moholy-NagyAmong Moholy-Nagy’s radical innovations were his experiments with camera-less photographs (which he dubbed photograms); his unconventional use of industrial materials in painting and sculpture; experiments with light, transparency, space, and motion across mediums; and his work at the forefront of abstraction, as he strove to reshape the role of the artist in the modern world. Moholy-Nagy: Future Present features paintings, sculptures, collages, drawings, prints, films, photograms, photographs, photomontages, projections, documentation, and examples of graphic, advertising, and stage design drawn from public and private collections across Europe and the United States.

Manifesto

Room of The Present

On display in the museum’s High Gallery is Room of the Present (Raum der Gegenwart), a contemporary fabrication of an exhibition space conceived of by Moholy-Nagy in 1930, but not realized in his lifetime.

Room of The Present

Light Prop for an Electric Stage
Light Prop for an Electric Stage

On view for the first time in the United States, the large-scale work contains photographic reproductions and design replicas as well as his kinetic Light Prop for an Electric Stage (Lichtrequisit einer elektrischen Bühne, 1930; recreated 2006). Room of the Present illustrates Moholy-Nagy’s belief in the power of images and the significance of the various means with which to view and disseminate them — a highly relevant paradigm in today’s constantly shifting and evolving technological world.

Room of The Present

Interior Elevation

This is a massive retrospective with lots to see and learn about the genius of László Moholy-Nagy. Here are a few more photos from this must-see show!

Three Pictures Black Backgrounds

Two Pictures

Ad From London Underground
Ad For The London Underground Circa 1936 – 37

Moholy-Nagy

Moholy-Nagy Pins Detail
Detail from Above Work

Moholy-Nagy

László Moholy-Nagy is a central figure in the history of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. In 1929, Solomon R. Guggenheim and his advisor, German-born artist Hilla Rebay, began collecting his paintings, works on paper, and sculpture in depth for the Guggenheim’s growing collection of nonobjective art. His work held a special place at the Museum of Non-Objective Painting — the forerunner of the Guggenheim Museum — where a memorial exhibition was presented shortly after his untimely death in 1946.

Moholy-Nagy

Moholy-Nagy: Future Present Runs Through September 7th, 2016 at the Guggenheim Museum, Located at 1071 Fifth Ave at 89th Street, NYC.

Moholy Nagy Gift Shop

Eye On Design: RCA Victor Special Model K Portable Electric Phonograph

Portable Electric Phonograph
All Photos By Gail

Designed by John Vassos for RCA (Radio Corporation of America) circa 1935 the Model K was relatively lightweight, being made out of aluminum, and the suitcase-style design featured its own speaker, a classy and reflective protective plate, and pockets inside the lid  to carry records.

Portable Electric Phonograph

Note the little design touches such as the tabs for the record slots, and the rounded cutouts (behind the metal plate) so you could easily get to the records themselves. The semi-domed, built-in speaker at the front of the case is a nice design touch.

Portable Electric Phonograph

Today, aluminum is taken for granted as a lightweight, inexpensive material that has many applications However, is was only in 1886 that an American, Charles Martin Halm discovered the process that made commercial production possible. Over the next forty years, aluminum evolved from a laboratory curiosity to an industrial staple

Photographed in the Brooklyn Museum.

Save

Save