Tag Archive | Design

Impress New Clients: 5 Business Card Design Tips to Make Your Brand Memorable

Business Card Template Image

First impressions count for everything, and you only get one chance to nail it. As a business owner, one way to make a solid impression is with a well-designed, professional looking business card. A solid business card design will show people you are serious about your company and help build that first level of trust.

Do you know what goes into designing a business card? What works and what to avoid? Keep reading to learn the core principles behind business card designs.

1. Make the Most of the Space You Have
Business cards offer you a restricted amount of space within which you can work, but at the same time, that gives you a lot of room to get creative with the space that you have.

Make your business card stand out from the rest by cleverly using both positive and negative space in your design.

2. Add Some Texture for a Unique Design
Who says you can’t cut into your business card and give it a bit of texture. From embossed prints to depressions, you can get a lot more out of your business card designs if you think about more than just the flat surface of a sheet of card.

3. Make Your Own for a Truly Unique Result
When thinking about how to design a business card, why not step away from the traditional entirely and give it a go yourself?

You can take the available business card templates from Adobe Spark and build your own design from the ground up. Now that will be a business card that nobody else can lay claim to.

4. Make Your Business Card Functional
A small piece of card that fits in your wallet. Sounds boring, right?
Well, what if you gave your business card a function. What if you gave it a purpose or design that made it leap from the wallet to the desk. From picture frames to USB sticks and even a plant growing envelope, there is no limit to where your business card designs can go if you think outside the box.

5. Give Thought to the Material You Use
A business card is, by classic definition, made of card. But what type? There are many sorts of card to choose from, and in this modern world, a classic twist is always welcome.

Why not experiment with different materials, and then look to combine it with any of the tips given above to create a truly memorable business card that will have your business on everybody’s lips.

A Strong Business Card Design Can Make or Break a Business
Even in this modern, digital age, the power of a strong business card design is clear. You owe it to yourself and your company to spend the time and nail your design.

You are not alone in this stage of the journey. The principles of design across all spectrums can be used to help design a business card that is eye-catching, professional, and helps to build your brand in the image you have for it.

Check out some of our other blogs for more inspiration, and use them to design a business card that you and your business can be proud of.

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Eye On Design: YOMI Inflatable Chair By Mojow

YOMI Chair
All Photos By Gail

Don’t think that I didn’t struggle with the decision of whether or not I should make the awesome YOMI chair a Pink Thing of The Day, because I did. But, ultimatlely, the design aspect won out. Because who doesn’t want to sit on an Inflatable Pink Chair? Plus it comes another colors.

YOMI Chair Front View

I’m a total sucker for inflatable furniture, because it reminds me of the sixties/pop aesthetic that I grew up loving and coveting, but which I was never able to embrace in my own home, because I was a a child and my parents were super square.  Plus, the inflatable home goods of that era were not so sturdy and maybe not as comfortable as they could be. But all that has changed thanks to the smart design approach of Mojow Furniture, makers of the YOMI chair.

YOMI Chair Cushion Detail

Check out the cushion detail above and you can see that the YOMI is compartmentalized so that each section inflates separately and fully, and thus creates a more secure and comfortable sitting experience. And unlike inflatables of the past, the YOMI rests on a sturdy frame.

YOMI Chair Top View

The Mojow YOMI chairs come in super trendy transparent or opaque colors, with a choice of black aluminum or wooden frame. Mojow furniture can be assembled and disassembled in a few minutes, then moved or stored easily. An electric pump is included with each chair. Mojow products are made of UV-treated PVC (thicker than a pool liner) and even have a rating for fire resistance!

YOMI Chair Box

Another cool aspect of the transparent YOMI is that you can personalize it by filling it with any solid objects you like, before inflating the cushions all the way. Feathers, glitter, branded items, little toys — you can totally create your own look! Make this chair a statement piece and design a room around it, or find the color that accents your existing decor.

Features
-Simple and fast assembly and disassembly with an electric pump
-Easy to clean
-Easy transportation and storage
-UV protection
-Manufacturing warranty 1 year

YOMI Chair Rear Side View

Priced at just $465, with Free Shipping available, you can find out more about the YOMI Chair, and order one for yourself, at Mojow USA Dot Com!

YOMI Chair

Push Pin Pumps By Laura Escamilla!

Push Pin Pumps
All Photos By Gail

Beautiful shoes can certainly be considered works of art, and in the case of these Hot Pink beauties created from ordinary push pins, that is exactly the case.

Push Pin Pumps

These striking Push Pin Shoes (1981), designed by Laura Escamilla, were part of a Public Art Installation called Obsessorize: Common Objects Uncommon Accessories, a joint venture between Madison Avenue Business Improvement District (BID) and students at the SVA 3D Design department.

Push Pin Pumps

These shoes were spotted somewhere along Madison Avenue in the upper 70s. The exhibit was co-sponsored by Marie Claire magazine.

Push Pin Pumps

Eye On Design: Simple Music Player for Dementia Patients

Simple Music Player
Photos By Gail

For patients suffering from dementia, the benefits of listening to music are significant, both for quality of life and for improving cognizance and lucidity.  The design of this Simple Music Player (2014) — a pre-loaded MP3 player — is radically simplified for ease of operation, and it appears non-threatening and recognizably familiar.

Simple Music Player

Once pre-loaded with the individual’s favorite music or an audio book, the user can activate  —  or stop — play by simply lifting the lid.

Designed by Lyndon Owen, Maurice Thompson and Bruce Barnet. Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan as Part of the Exhibit, Access and Ability.

 

Eye On Design: Nobody’s Perfect Chair By Gaetano Pesce

Nobody's Perfect Chair
Photos By Gail

Gaetano Pesce’s playful Nobody’s Perfect chair (2001) embodies diversity within standardization. Following simple guidelines, the maker pours pigmented resin into a mold to achieve a random quantity and mix of colors. The back of this chair presents an excellent example of the phenomena of Pareidolia, which encouragee you to see an image resembling a face.

Nobody's Perfect Chair

The liquid resin is hardened into the furniture’s components, which are later assembled with pegs.

Nobody's Perfect Chair

The ‘face’ that the back of this chair resembles is quite fun!

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.

Christopher Chiappa’s Compositions at Kate Werble Gallery

Front Room Installation View
All Photos By Gail

When last we visited Kate Werble Gallery for one of sculptor Christopher Chiappa’s immersive exhibits, the place was covered wall-to-wall, floor-to-celing with Fried Eggs, and that was a good time. For his fourth exhibition at the gallery, Chiappa has installed in its front and back rooms two collections of what, on first glance, appear to be brightly colored, painted wooden tables. On closer examination, however, the at once familiar table shapes of Chiappa’s sculptures transmute and metamorphose into increasingly whimsical and delightful forms as you progress through the galleries. It’s a hoot.

Front Room Partial Install

With this show, Chiappa attempts a reset from past projects by returning to the most fundamental elements of abstraction: geometric shapes, solid colors, and line. His Compositions are made slowly, by hand; and his use of bright color serves to emphasize the assembly. The junctures between individual planes of wood are heightened by the sharp transitions in opposing colors and forms.

Blue Table

This one is my favorite. I think because of the Pink leg.

Red and Yellow Stacking

Mondrian Table

These works operate firmly within the gap of the simile. In color, shape, and temperament, they metabolize a succession of art historical reference points: Suprematism, Constructivism, Bauhaus, and Memphis Group. Like the Suprematists, for example, Chiappa uses the language of non-objective abstraction. However, instead of seeking to transcend the material world, he purposefully goes the wrong way around; he directs these forms back to the familiar.

Rainbow Table

Turquoise Table Set

As the tables become more abstract, you can play a fun game coming up with ideas of what the shapes remind you of.

Fed Ex Table

In this one, the use of Orange and Purple reminds me of the Fed Ex logo!

Bicycle Table

This one reminds me of deconstructed version of a child’s Tricycle.

Twisty Table

The Red Shape at the top of this one looks like a Fish trying to swim away. If you add in that Black Shape to the lower left, it could also be a Chicken.

Tangled Sculpture 2

In this, I see a group of friends of different races playing a game of One Potato Two Potato. See? Lots of fun. And I was by myself, so imagine how much more interesting it could be if you see the show with a friend.

Now lets check out the back room, where things get weirder.

Rear Gallery Installation View 2

Chiappa’s Compositions evolve without foreseen conclusion, evidence that repetition leads not to sameness but to difference. The early works remain closest to the basic form, and they gradually deviate further from the original. Though the parameters and materials remain the same, the final sculptures feel far removed from the first. The result is an autonomous object whose symbolic reference point has broken down altogether.

Target Table

I see a big Target.

Target Legs

Look at all those Legs!

Rocking Sculpture

Sculpture Collection

Blue Spire Sculpture

Blue Table Sculpture

Stacking E Tables

Compositions is a really fun exhibit, espcially for fans of minimalists like Ellsworth Kelly and modern furniture design. And you still hove lots of time to check it out!

Christopher Chiappa’s Compositions Will be on Exhibit Through June 2nd, 2018 at Kate Werble Gallery, Located at 83 Vandam Street, Soho, NYC.

Rear Gallery Installation View
Rear Gallery Installation View

Eye On Design: Menorah #7 By Peter Shire

Menorah #7 By Peter Shire
All Photos By Gail

In the 1980s, Judaica artists began to reexamine the form of the Hanukkah lamp, which according to rabbinical prescription should have eight lights in a straight row and on the same level, with a ninth set off from them.  Peter Shire (b. 1947) typically takes familiar objects and reimagines their shapes, colors and materials so that we barely recognize them.

Menorah #7 By Peter Shire

In his Menorah #7  (1986), a mixture of pastel and hot colors, industrial metals and a cantilevered, swirling arrangement of parts  challenge the modernist aesthetic of simplicity that had dominated design for a century. This post-modernism was a key design principe of the Memphis Design Group to which Shire belonged.

Menorah #7 By Peter Shire

Photographed in The Jewish Museum in Manhattan.