Tag Archive | Statue

Hippo Ballerina in the Flatiron District

Hippo Ballerina
Photos By Gail

If you’ve seen the classic Disney film Fantasia, one of the Flatiron district’s new residents  may look familiar to you. Hippo Ballerina, created by artist Bjørn Okholm Skaarup, is a bronze statue of a Hippo wearing a Tutu, standing over fifteen feet high, and weighing two and one-half tons.  Installed on the east side of the Flatiron Building during the first week of September, the monumental artwork was formerly installed at Lincoln Center, but has been without a home since it was removed from that location in  October, 2017. Kids especially seem to love it. If you’re looking for locations to snap unique souvenir photos from your trip to NYC, add this one to your list. The new installation of the statue was made possible through NYC DOT Art & Event Programming, Cavalier Galleries and the Flatiron Partnership.

Hippo Ballerina can be found on the Flatiron South Public Plaza, Between 22nd and 23rd Streets along Broadway, in Manhattan. The Statue is Scheduled to Be Up Through Thanksgiving, 2019.

Hippo Ballerina

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Art On The High Line: Veit Laurent Kurz, Salamanderbrunnen

Salamanderbrunnen
All Photos By Gail

Veit Laurent Kurz (b. 1985 in Erbach, Germany) cultivates artificial ecosystems composed of a variety of living and nonliving materials, including plants, mosses, nondescript chemicals, biohazardous material containers, industrial plastic tubing, and paint.

Salamanderbrunnen

For the High Line’s Mutations series, Kurz created Salamanderbrunnen; a fountain that circulates Herba-4, Kurz’s imagined “herbal juice of the future,” asking us to imagine the new forms of nature that we create together.

Salamanderbrunnen

Salamanderbrunnen will be on Exhibit at the High Line, Closest to the Gansevoort Street Staircase, Through April 2018.

Salamanderbrunnen

Pink Thing Of The Day: Pink Flamingo Pool Statue

Flamingo Pool Statue
All Photos By Gail

Ah, California at Christmastime is a singular experience, filled with visions of kidney-shaped swimming pools expertly re-created by the pool replastering Orange County company and of course, oversized Pink Flamingo statues.

Swimming Pool and Famingo

Because, why not?

Swimming Pool and Famingo

Swimming Pool and Famingo

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Jean-Léon Gerome, Pygmalion and Galatea

Pygmalion and Galatea
Photo By Gail

Between 1890 and 1892, Jean-Léon Gerome (1824 – 1904) made both painted and sculpted variations of the theme of Pygmalion and Galatea, the tale recounted in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. All depict the moment when the sculpture of Galatea was brought to life by the goddess Venus, in fulfillment of Pygmalion’s wish for a wife as beautiful as the sculpture he created. This is one of three known versions in oil that are closely related to a polychrome marble sculpture, also fashioned by Gerome (located at Hearst Castle, San Simeon, CA). In each of the paintings, the sculpture appears at a different angle, as though is was being viewed in the round.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art on NYC.

Zebra Cow By Ron English

Zebra Cow
All Photos By Gail

The last couple of times I passed by the Popaganda Pop Up Store on the corner of Washington and Gansevoort Streets in the meatpacking district, the shop was closed. So I’m not sure if it’s closed for good, or was just not open for business on those days. But anyway, that’s where I saw this cow.

Zebra Cow

Future Buddha

Amida Buddha
Image of Amida Buddha, Gold Leaf Over Wood, Kama-kura, Japan, 1742 (Photo By Gail)

Some forms of Japanese Buddhism are rooted in the Mahayana, or Great Vehicle, school of belief. They regard Gautama, the Buddha of India, as only one of an almost endless sequence of Buddhas reaching back over an incomprehensible span of years. However, Amida Buddha is considered the Buddha yet to come; his invocation has been particularly important in Japan.

Photographed in the Museum of Natural History in NYC.