Tag Archive | Anton Kern Gallery

Video: David Shrigley’s Fluff War!

Fluff War Installation View
Video and All Photos By Gail

I admit that I had not visited the current, midtown location of Anton Kern Gallery since they moved from West 20th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, which was a few years ago at this point. Because Midtown. But then I heard that one of my very favorite living artists, David Shrigley, had an upcoming exhibit at gallery, so I had to attend. Because David Shrigley is The Shit.

Fluff War, as it is called, is Shrigley’s seventh solo exhibition at Anton Kern, and it is comprised of the titular large-scale kinetic sculpture, plus two neon sculptures, and 100 new drawings. If you follow me on the Instagram (@gailpink61) — which you should —  then you have seen an assortment of Shrigley’s hilarious drawings which I have been posting over the past couple of weeks under the hashtag #dailyshrigley. Since they are already on The ‘Gram, as the kids says, I will not be posting any of the drawings here. This post is just about the Fluff War itself.

David Shrigley Fluff War

The structure of Fluff War is a ten foot by ten foot square enclosure akin to a miniature soccer stadium or a giant air hockey table. Trapped inside are clusters of black wooly fluff being blown about a smooth white floor by gusts of wind coming in through surrounding vents. Below is a video I filmed of the Fluff at War!


Mesmerizing and fun! War is a cheeky misnomer for what the fluff is engaged in. Incapable of exerting its own will, the fluff is at the whim of hidden fans, randomly sequenced by a computer program, blowing at varying intervals and strengths. It remains unclear which fluff is winning or losing, what the objective is, or if there is one at all. Regardless, one can easily become an enraptured observer of this nonsensical activity.

Fluff War Installation View

Fluff War Observed From the Gallery’s Second Floor!

David Shrigley Fluff War

David Shrigley’s Fluff War Runs Through June 15th, 2019 at Anton Kern Gallery, Located at 16 East 55th Street, in NYC.

Fluff War Neon Sign

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David Shrigley at Anton Kern Gallery

Sorry We Bombed You
All Art By David Shrigley. All Photos By Gail

Do you love the art of humorist /painter David Shrigley? I sure do. Confession: I have a little crush on him. He is amazing, and I worship his art. Anton Kern Gallery is currently hosting a show of new paintings by David Shrigley, the opening reception of which Geoffrey and I excitedly I attended on Thursday, April 16th. I recommend you go see this show while you can.

Gallery Shot

First, I want to show you what the gallery looked like with people in it, so you can see how the works are hung and get an idea of why all of my photos had to be cropped at weird angles. Because I am not 15 feet tall. In case you are not familiar with why David Shrigley completely rules, here is some background on his deal, which I cut and pasted from his Wikipedia entry.

Eat The Bugs

David Shrigley is best known for his mordantly humorous cartoons released in softcover books or postcard packs. He finds humor in flat depictions of the inconsequential, the unavailing, and the bizarre, although he is far fonder of violent or otherwise disquieting subject matter.

Everything I Do is Right

His work has two of the characteristics often encountered in Outsider Art: an odd viewpoint and, in some of his work, a deliberately limited technique. His freehand line is often weak (which jars with his frequent use of a ruler), his forms are often very crude, and annotations in his drawings are poorly executed and frequently contain crossings-out.

Six Shrigley's

In authentic outsider art, the artist has no choice but to produce work in his or her own way, even if that work is unconventional in content and inept in execution. In contrast, it is likely that Shrigley has chosen his style and range of subject matter for comic effect.

I am a Sign Writer

Two Sides It Will Fade

Subtractor

In addition to the 78 drawings on display, the exhibit includes two sculptures, one of which is this Subtractor; a calculator with limited function keys.

Opening Hours

What the Hell Are You Doing

They sell this book at the gallery. Just thinking about opening its pages makes me squeal.

Autograph

David was present at the opening party and he is very easy to spot because he is about 6’5″ at least and also very, very cute. I had brought with me this cartoon of his that I love, which says “No Speed Limit Anymore Go As Fast As You Want Like in Germany” and I asked him if he would sign it, so he signed it “in German.” I love him.

New Works By David Shrigley will be on Exhibit Through May 23rd, 2015 at Anton Kern Gallery, Located at 532 West 20th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

David Shrigley Signage

David Shrigley

You Will Get Dirty

Anton Kern Gallery Presents New Sculptures By Brazilian Artist Marepe

Peixe Com Auréola
Peixe Com Auréola (Fish with Halo), All Photos By Gail

When I was a teenager, there was a popular saying that “A Woman Needs a Man Like a Fish Needs a Bicycle” — which is still totally true, if a bit dated. I thought of that saying immediately when I saw the Fish-Bicycle hybrid sculpture, Peixe Com Auréola (Fish with Halo), at Anton Kern Gallery this past Friday, when I was there for the opening reception for new works by the Brazilian Artist called Marepe.

For his third solo show at Anton Kern, Marepe presents a group of six sculptures made of common objects and put together with great formal rigor and poetic potential. These works achieve a complex layering of references and meanings addressing the linkage between the individual and society.

A Coruja,
A Coruja (The Owl)

Marepe’s sculptures are made from everyday materials such as plastic buckets and tables, ironing boards, brooms, bicycles, wheelbarrows and chipboard. Some titles, such as Embutido Sanfona (embedded accordion), are inspired by popular music. Others are factual and descriptive, such as Empilhamento (stacking). The work allows for a direct reading and, perhaps more importantly, leads toward a sensory experience; an intimacy of touch and interaction, comparable to the deeply emotional experience and immediacy of listening to music.

Sistema M
Sistema M (System M)

Duchamp and Neoconcretismo may be part of Marepe’s inspiration, but it is the artist’s deep concern for the social and for human interaction that drives his art. He combines quotidian objects and materials to form disarmingly simple monuments, some suggesting abstract forms, others depicting figures engaged in dance-like interaction, and in some cases allowing cut-out chipboard to assist in creating specific figures.

Embutido Sanfona
Embutido Sanfona (Built-in Accordion/Concertina)

Many of Marepe’s titles refer to Brazilian music or lyrics. Embutido Sanfona for example, can be translated as “built-in concertina,” the slightly smaller version of the accordion which is the lead instrument in Forró, a thrilling and infectious folk-pop music from the North-East of Brazil, the region where Marepe grew up and still lives and works. “Embutido Sanfona” also refers to Marepe’s previous wooden models for rooms and trucks and his interest in communal and shared spaces. It is simultaneously a minimalist kinetic sculpture, a model for multi-purpose housing, and a musical celebration.

Empilhamento I and Empilhamento II
Empilhamento I and Empilhamento II (Stacking One and Two)

Marepe’s work speaks, or rather sings of everyday life and love, celebrating and elevating the specific materials and origins of the work to the universal. The ordinary shines in its simple beauty declaring its liberating and transformative power.

Cabeça Ciclica
Cabeça Ciclica (Head Cycle)
New Sculptures By Marepe will be on Exhibit through Saturday, December 14, 2013 at Anton Kern Gallery, Located at 532 West 20th Street In the Chelsea Gallery District.

Signs by David Shrigley at Anton Kern Gallery

Don't Look at Me By David Shrigley
Don’t Look At Me By David Shrigley

Warped humor: I can’t get enough of it. Maybe that’s why I was so smitten by artist / cartoonist David Shrigley’s new exhibit at Anton Kern Gallery, entitled Signs. As the name suggests, the exhibit is comprised of various types of signage – from crude wooden plaques hung just a foot or two from the gallery’s ceiling, to brightly glowing neon, to minimalist slogans painted on the fronts of stuffed toys, to word sculptures and posters resembling eye-charts for the severely myopic, which Shrigley emblazons with quirky sayings just begging to be deciphered. It other words, the show is a sardonic, snarky good time.

Backward Burger Neon Sign By David Shrigley
Backwards Burgers, Neon Sign

Here are a few of our favorite Signs from last Thursday’s opening reception!

It's a Dream

I Found a Shoe

It's OK It's Not OK

Rats Asses

Help Me

If you look at the lower right corner of the above photo, you’ll see a traffic signal affixed to the wall above a tiny doorway. One second before I snapped this photo, one of those tiny little kids walked through the doorway from the other room and smacked his head. Ironic. See what’s written on the opposite side of the “Help Me” sign below.Please Don't Help Me

Words Wall Sculpture

Sleep Please Go to Sleep

Free Hot Dogs for All Citizens

Enjoy Your Hell
Pink Hell!

Signs by David Shrigley is on exhibit now at Anton Kern Gallery, Located at 532 West 20th Street in Manhattan, though February 19, 2013.