Tag Archives: kinetic

Alex Da Corte’s As Long As The Sun Lasts at the Met Roof Garden

alex da corte sculpture photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

I’ve been fortunate to visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art probably half a dozen times since it reopened last July, post-Covid lockdown, but the building’s roof garden only just reopened in April, for the debut of its latest site-specific commission.  As Long As The Sun Lasts, by Philadelphia-based artist Alex Da Corte, is a whimsical mash up of Sesame Street and the works of Alexander Calder that could light up the rooftop even on the cloudiest day.

Continue reading Alex Da Corte’s As Long As The Sun Lasts at the Met Roof Garden

Eye On Design: Parabolic Evening Gown by Pierre Cardin

pierre cardin parabolic evening gown photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Technically, a parabola is a symmetrically mirrored U-shape. Pierre Cardin began working with the parabola in the 1950s, particularly in the 1957 Lasso collection. With the introduction of stretch fabrics and hoops in the 1960s, those sweeping, graceful parabolic drapes became amplified, evolving into ellipses and cones.

pierre cardin parabolic evening gown photo by gail worley

Some of Cardin’s “Parabolic” fashions collapse flat, are easily packed, and emerge as before — like his earlier Cardine dresses, which could be twisted, rolled and stowed effortlessly into luggage. Developed alongside Cardin’s investigations into furniture sculpture, the big, sculptural shapes of the Parabolic dresses were likewise designed to be seen in 360 degrees. And since they were made of stretch fabric, they had a bounce reminiscent of his “Kinetic” dresses from 1972.

pierre cardin parabolic evening gown photo by gail worley

Referencing his earlier “Lasso” or “Eye of the Needle” designs done in wool and mohair, in 1990s’ Parabolic Evening GownCardin creates the shape as a pink and green silk parabola.

Photographed in The Brooklyn Museum.

Video: David Shrigley’s Fluff War!

Fluff War Installation View
Video and All Photos By Gail

I admit that I had not visited the current, midtown location of Anton Kern Gallery since they moved from West 20th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, which was a few years ago at this point. Because Midtown. But then I heard that one of my very favorite living artists, David Shrigley, had an upcoming exhibit at gallery, so I had to attend. Because David Shrigley is The Shit. Continue reading Video: David Shrigley’s Fluff War!

Daniel Rozin Cracked Mud at Bitforms Gallery

Cracked Mud Still Full
All Photos and Video By Gail

It wasn’t until the very last day of the exhibit that I made it over to Bitforms Gallery to check out Israeli-American artist Daniel Rozin’s 3-piece interactive show, Sol. To be honest, I was most interested in a piece that everyone seemed to be writing about, a kinetic sculpture/installation called Cracked Mud (2019), which mimics the cracked surface of a dry river bed, stretched out under a glowing sun-like orb. Continue reading Daniel Rozin Cracked Mud at Bitforms Gallery

Modern Art Monday Presents: Man Ray, Obstruction

Man Ray Obstruction
All Photos By Gail

Man Ray (1890 – 1976) worked in a wide variety of media, including photography, painting, and sculpture, often blurring the boundaries between these practices. Obstruction, an assemblage of 63 wooden coat hangers, is an example of the type of artwork Dada artist Marcel Duchamp called a Ready-Made, a term that suggests Man Ray’s appropriation and manipulation of pre-existing, common objects. The sculpture playfully mimics a chandelier, but, as the hangers seemingly divide and multiply, Obstruction quickly evolves into a dense tangle of overlapping forms. Cast shadows serve as distorted, immaterial extensions of its physical presence. Man Ray first created Obstruction in 1920, but the present work belongs to an addition of 15 reproductions that he created in 1961 for an important exhibition of kinetic art.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Man Ray Obstruction