Tag Archive | David Shrigley

Video: David Shrigley’s Fluff War!

Fluff War Installation View
Video and All Photos By Gail

I admit that I had not visited the current, midtown location of Anton Kern Gallery since they moved from West 20th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, which was a few years ago at this point. Because Midtown. But then I heard that one of my very favorite living artists, David Shrigley, had an upcoming exhibit at gallery, so I had to attend. Because David Shrigley is The Shit.

Fluff War, as it is called, is Shrigley’s seventh solo exhibition at Anton Kern, and it is comprised of the titular large-scale kinetic sculpture, plus two neon sculptures, and 100 new drawings. If you follow me on the Instagram (@gailpink61) — which you should —  then you have seen an assortment of Shrigley’s hilarious drawings which I have been posting over the past couple of weeks under the hashtag #dailyshrigley. Since they are already on The ‘Gram, as the kids says, I will not be posting any of the drawings here. This post is just about the Fluff War itself.

David Shrigley Fluff War

The structure of Fluff War is a ten foot by ten foot square enclosure akin to a miniature soccer stadium or a giant air hockey table. Trapped inside are clusters of black wooly fluff being blown about a smooth white floor by gusts of wind coming in through surrounding vents. Below is a video I filmed of the Fluff at War!


Mesmerizing and fun! War is a cheeky misnomer for what the fluff is engaged in. Incapable of exerting its own will, the fluff is at the whim of hidden fans, randomly sequenced by a computer program, blowing at varying intervals and strengths. It remains unclear which fluff is winning or losing, what the objective is, or if there is one at all. Regardless, one can easily become an enraptured observer of this nonsensical activity.

Fluff War Installation View

Fluff War Observed From the Gallery’s Second Floor!

David Shrigley Fluff War

David Shrigley’s Fluff War Runs Through June 15th, 2019 at Anton Kern Gallery, Located at 16 East 55th Street, in NYC.

Fluff War Neon Sign

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David Shrigley, Memorial

David Shrigley Memorial
All Photos By Gail

Across the centuries, memorials have acted as public sites of collective remembrance and markers of our shared cultural heritage. Some monuments continue to hold a contemporary significance, while others have become obsolete in an ever-changing urban and social landscape; their meanings often lost from civic consciousness.

Memorial, Rear View
Memorial, Rear View (Plaza Hotel in Background)

Memorial, by British artist David Shrigley honors one of the most common of all acts: the writing for a grocery list. By engrave this ephemeral, throwaway list on a solid slab of granite — a material ubiquitous with the language of monuments — the artist humorously subverts both a daily routine and the role of the classic memorial.

While Shrigley’s shopping list might appear to posture as a counter-monument, through its celebration of common activity, its anonymity and absurdity, the sculpture becomes a memorial both to no one and to everyone — perhaps standing as a simple but poignant ode to humanity.

David Shrigley: Memorial will be on view through February 26, 2017 in Doris C. Freedman Plaza, Central Park, Fifth Avenue at 59th Street. 

Adriano Costa, Lipstick Boutique at Frieze NY

Lipstick Boutique
All Photos By Gail

Frieze NY Weekend may be over until next year, but I’ve got a ton of cool photos to share with you so you can feel like you were there with me! You’re welcome! One of the pieces we really liked is this collage by Brazilian artist, Adriano Costa. Costa works with found objects and collage to translate the detritus of commodity culture into infinitely curious compositions. This collage, entitled Lipstick Boutique (2015) reminded me so much of works by David Shrigley; not just for the style but for the sense of humor.

Draw a Penis

Isn’t the above just like something you’d see at a Shrigley exhibit? Sure it is.

Truth About My Sex Tape Hell

I like this one, too. It could stand on its own for sure, but it certainly adds to the whole in this piece that took up an entire wall at the Frieze booth of the London-Based Sadie Coles Gallery.

Male 25

Do you know this guy? I think I have dated him.

David Shrigley at Anton Kern Gallery

Sorry We Bombed You
All Art By David Shrigley. All Photos By Gail

Do you love the art of humorist /painter David Shrigley? I sure do. Confession: I have a little crush on him. He is amazing, and I worship his art. Anton Kern Gallery is currently hosting a show of new paintings by David Shrigley, the opening reception of which Geoffrey and I excitedly I attended on Thursday, April 16th. I recommend you go see this show while you can.

Gallery Shot

First, I want to show you what the gallery looked like with people in it, so you can see how the works are hung and get an idea of why all of my photos had to be cropped at weird angles. Because I am not 15 feet tall. In case you are not familiar with why David Shrigley completely rules, here is some background on his deal, which I cut and pasted from his Wikipedia entry.

Eat The Bugs

David Shrigley is best known for his mordantly humorous cartoons released in softcover books or postcard packs. He finds humor in flat depictions of the inconsequential, the unavailing, and the bizarre, although he is far fonder of violent or otherwise disquieting subject matter.

Everything I Do is Right

His work has two of the characteristics often encountered in Outsider Art: an odd viewpoint and, in some of his work, a deliberately limited technique. His freehand line is often weak (which jars with his frequent use of a ruler), his forms are often very crude, and annotations in his drawings are poorly executed and frequently contain crossings-out.

Six Shrigley's

In authentic outsider art, the artist has no choice but to produce work in his or her own way, even if that work is unconventional in content and inept in execution. In contrast, it is likely that Shrigley has chosen his style and range of subject matter for comic effect.

I am a Sign Writer

Two Sides It Will Fade

Subtractor

In addition to the 78 drawings on display, the exhibit includes two sculptures, one of which is this Subtractor; a calculator with limited function keys.

Opening Hours

What the Hell Are You Doing

They sell this book at the gallery. Just thinking about opening its pages makes me squeal.

Autograph

David was present at the opening party and he is very easy to spot because he is about 6’5″ at least and also very, very cute. I had brought with me this cartoon of his that I love, which says “No Speed Limit Anymore Go As Fast As You Want Like in Germany” and I asked him if he would sign it, so he signed it “in German.” I love him.

New Works By David Shrigley will be on Exhibit Through May 23rd, 2015 at Anton Kern Gallery, Located at 532 West 20th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

David Shrigley Signage

David Shrigley

You Will Get Dirty

Domino Set By David Shrigley

Domino Set By David Shrigley
All Photos By Gail

Ah, David Shrigley, we love his heavily-warped worldview and sense of the absurd! This Domino Set designed by Shrigley is part of the new Play collection, a collaboration between the artist and Third Drawer Down Studios, as offered by the New Museum of Contemporary Art.

Domino Set By David Shrigley
Domino Tile Details

There’s rarely a dull moment when you’re playing games with David Shrigley. Instead of the traditional uniform of matching dots and tiles, you’ll find characters such as Skulls, Grumpy Old Men, and Raggedy Cats on each tile, which makes this 28-piece set a perfect diversion for when you or your partner are plotting your next move.

Available in the Gift Shop at the New Museum of Contemporary Art on Bowery and Prince Street in lower Manhattan, priced at $65 per set, $55.25 for Members.

Domino Set By David Shrigley

Signs by David Shrigley at Anton Kern Gallery

Don't Look at Me By David Shrigley
Don’t Look At Me By David Shrigley

Warped humor: I can’t get enough of it. Maybe that’s why I was so smitten by artist / cartoonist David Shrigley’s new exhibit at Anton Kern Gallery, entitled Signs. As the name suggests, the exhibit is comprised of various types of signage – from crude wooden plaques hung just a foot or two from the gallery’s ceiling, to brightly glowing neon, to minimalist slogans painted on the fronts of stuffed toys, to word sculptures and posters resembling eye-charts for the severely myopic, which Shrigley emblazons with quirky sayings just begging to be deciphered. It other words, the show is a sardonic, snarky good time.

Backward Burger Neon Sign By David Shrigley
Backwards Burgers, Neon Sign

Here are a few of our favorite Signs from last Thursday’s opening reception!

It's a Dream

I Found a Shoe

It's OK It's Not OK

Rats Asses

Help Me

If you look at the lower right corner of the above photo, you’ll see a traffic signal affixed to the wall above a tiny doorway. One second before I snapped this photo, one of those tiny little kids walked through the doorway from the other room and smacked his head. Ironic. See what’s written on the opposite side of the “Help Me” sign below.Please Don't Help Me

Words Wall Sculpture

Sleep Please Go to Sleep

Free Hot Dogs for All Citizens

Enjoy Your Hell
Pink Hell!

Signs by David Shrigley is on exhibit now at Anton Kern Gallery, Located at 532 West 20th Street in Manhattan, though February 19, 2013.

British Pop Gods Blur to Release Blur 21: The Box Set

Blur 21 Box Set

It’s been 21 years since the release of their debut album Leisure in 1991, and due to popular demand British Pop band Blur’s body of work has been personally compiled by the band and gathered together in one box, due for release by Parlophone in North America on July 31st, 2012. Blur 21: The Box collects all seven studio albums with over 5½ hours of unreleased material, including 65 previously unreleased tracks and more than twice as many rarities, 3 DVDs, a collector’s edition book featuring rare and unseen photos and a new and exclusive interview with the band. The set also includes a special limited edition 7-inch vinyl disc featuring a track recorded under the band’s original name, Seymour. The Blur 21 box will also include a digital download code for the albums and all bonus material.

This awesome collection – which sees the first 5 albums re-mastered by Frank Arkwright in Abbey Road Studios – has been fully overseen by Graham Coxon and producer Stephen Street. Highlights of the box include early versions of tracks recorded for Leisure, bare bones early demos of the classic singles “For Tomorrow” and “Beetlebum,” previously unheard songs “Saturday Morning” and “Hope You Find Your Suburbs” and never released sessions with Bill Laswell and the legendary session with XTC’s Andy Partridge. Other rarities are “Don’t Bomb When You’re The Bomb,” “The Wassailling Song” and “Fools Day,” which appear on CD for the first time. DVD material includes Live at Alexandra Palace 1994 and Live at Wembley ‘The Singles Night’ 1999.

In addition to the 21-disc Deluxe Box Set, all 7 studio albums will be available individually, each with a second disc of b-sides, previously hard-to-find tracks and exclusive bonus material. A vinyl box set will also be released, with six of the seven albums on double-vinyl, highlighting iconic artwork and visuals from Banksy, David Shrigley and Graham Coxon among others. The vinyl box set will include a download code to access all of the bonus material digitally. Each of the 7 LPs will also be available separately on heavyweight vinyl.

Blur’s 7 studio albums are: Leisure (1991), Modern Life Is Rubbish (1993), Parklife (1994), The Great Escape (1995), Blur (1997), 13 (1999) and Think Tank (2003). For full track-listing and a complete list of all bonus material and rarities please visit www.blur.co.uk/blur21.