Tag Archive | Kinetic Sculpture

Video: David Shrigley’s Fluff War!

Fluff War Installation View
Video and All Photos By Gail

I admit that I had not visited the current, midtown location of Anton Kern Gallery since they moved from West 20th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, which was a few years ago at this point. Because Midtown. But then I heard that one of my very favorite living artists, David Shrigley, had an upcoming exhibit at gallery, so I had to attend. Because David Shrigley is The Shit.

Fluff War, as it is called, is Shrigley’s seventh solo exhibition at Anton Kern, and it is comprised of the titular large-scale kinetic sculpture, plus two neon sculptures, and 100 new drawings. If you follow me on the Instagram (@gailpink61) — which you should —  then you have seen an assortment of Shrigley’s hilarious drawings which I have been posting over the past couple of weeks under the hashtag #dailyshrigley. Since they are already on The ‘Gram, as the kids says, I will not be posting any of the drawings here. This post is just about the Fluff War itself.

David Shrigley Fluff War

The structure of Fluff War is a ten foot by ten foot square enclosure akin to a miniature soccer stadium or a giant air hockey table. Trapped inside are clusters of black wooly fluff being blown about a smooth white floor by gusts of wind coming in through surrounding vents. Below is a video I filmed of the Fluff at War!


Mesmerizing and fun! War is a cheeky misnomer for what the fluff is engaged in. Incapable of exerting its own will, the fluff is at the whim of hidden fans, randomly sequenced by a computer program, blowing at varying intervals and strengths. It remains unclear which fluff is winning or losing, what the objective is, or if there is one at all. Regardless, one can easily become an enraptured observer of this nonsensical activity.

Fluff War Installation View

Fluff War Observed From the Gallery’s Second Floor!

David Shrigley Fluff War

David Shrigley’s Fluff War Runs Through June 15th, 2019 at Anton Kern Gallery, Located at 16 East 55th Street, in NYC.

Fluff War Neon Sign

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Marcel Duchamp’s Rotary Demisphere (Precision Optics)

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Rotary Demisphere
Photo By Gail

Created in 1925, Marcel Duchamp’s Rotary Demisphere (Precision Optics) is a kinetic sculpture that turns itself on at random intervals. Back in Paris after World War I, Duchamp experimented with machines that produced optical effects — work he had begun in New York. When this machine is set in motion, the circles appear to pulsate toward the viewer. The copper ring around the dome’s circumference is engraved with French words chosen for the way their sounds echo one another: Rrose Selavy et moi esquivons les ecchymoses des esquimaux aux mots exquis (Rrose Selavy and I dodge the Eskimos’s bruises with exquisite words).

Rotary Demisphere is part of the Permanent Collection at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC. Find it in the Painting and Sculpture Galleries.

Mixed Mediums at Dorian Grey Gallery

X Marks The Spot By BTA
X Marks The Spot By BTA (All Photos By Gail)

The latest group show at Dorian Grey Gallery in the East village, entitled Mixed Mediums, is a true mixed bag of styles. The collected works of more than a dozen artists still manages to achieve a cohesive feel, however, owing to the crossover appeal of various styles of contemporary/pop art.

Cope 2 Skate Decks
Cope 2 Skate Decks

The NYC Street Art movement that the gallery seems to most closely align itself with is represented with works by artists like Cope 2 and BTA.

Perhaps most surprising piece in the collection is a single work by Israeli Kinetic Scultor/Op Artist, Yaacov Agam, seen in a series of sequential shots below:
Yaacov Agam Star of David 3
Photographed from the Right

Yaacov Agam Star of David 1
Photographed from Near Center

Yaacov Agam Star of David 2
Photographed from the Left

The Star of David is an excellent example of Agam’s work, which takes on the appearance of many different pictures and abstract designs, depending on the angle from which it is viewed. I have one of his pieces in my home and I just love it. This one is on sale for $4,500, which is a decent price.

Robert Kantor Double Neck Guitar
Robert Kantor’s Swarovski Crystal Embellished Double Neck Gretsch Guitar

Sculptor Robert Kantor presents three of his Swarovski Crystal-embellished guitars and half a dozen additional works that combine guitar parts with colorful crystal bling. Very Nice!

Robert Kantor A Rose By Any Other
Robert Kantor’s A Rose By Any Other

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The Retro/Gothic collage/sculptures of Robbi Wesson (above three photos) would fit right in at an exhibit at Last Rites Gallery. Wesson uses hardware, architectural embellishments, bone, feathers and polished stones, among other found items, to create one-of-a-kind works of art that suggest an enigmatic back story. Highly collectible!

Spence X The Myth Series
Spence X’s The Myth Series

I admit I was a bit perplexed by Spence X’s Myth Series, which is a collection of the artist’s tin foil sculptures of various mythical creatures. These are fun and whimsical and even a bit hilarious, but they looked rather juvenile in the context of the show and, to be brutally honest, most reminded me of the tin foil animal sculptures that servers would create as containers for leftover food at a favorite family restaurant I frequented when I was living in California. So, there’s that.

Spence X The Myth Series

Overall, Mixed Mediums is a fun and eclectic show that’s worth checking out if you are a fan of any of these artists or just happen to be in the neighborhood.

Diorama By Lisa Pan
Art By Lisa Pan

Mixed Mediums will be on exhibit at Dorian Grey Gallery, Located at 437 East 9th Street (Between Ave A and 1st Ave) until September 27th, 2013.

Joshua Liner Christens New Gallery Space with Direct Address: An Inaugural Group Exhibition

Stephen Powers A Month of Somedays
Stephen Powers A Month of Somedays

One of our favorite Galleries in the Chelsea Arts District, Joshua Liner, has just moved from an upper floor at 540 West 28th Street to a 2,600-square-foot street level exhibition space that completely transforms the environmental aesthetic of the gallery. To celebrate the move, Joshua Liner is currently presenting Direct Address, an inaugural group exhibition featuring works in diverse media by longtime gallery figures as well as new additions to the program. Participants include the following artists:

Alfred Steiner, Clayton Brothers, Cleon Peterson, Dave Kinsey, David Ellis, Evan Hecox, Greg Lamarche, Ian Francis, Jean-Pierre Roy, Kris Kuksi, Oliver Vernon, Pema Rinzin, Richard Colman, Riusuke Fukahori, Shawn Barber, Stephen Powers, SWOON, Tiffany Bozic, Tomokazu Matsuyama and Tony Curanaj.

While I missed last week’s opening reception, I did drop by to see the show early last evening and was blown away not only by the gorgeous new space, but also by the fantastic artworks; some by artists I have come to know well through the Liner gallery, and other artists whose work I was seeing for the first time.

Here are some of my favorite pieces from the show:

Riusuke Fukahori Rinne

What you see here is neither real fish nor real water, but a micro-layered acrylic painting by Japanese artist Riusuke Fukahori, which is viewed as a solid object. Pretty cool!

David Ellis All That Glitters Kinetic sound and light installation
All That Glitters by David Ellis

This kinetic sculpture/chandelier by David Ellis is equipped with motors as well as recorded music, so that it plays various original instrumental pieces at random, accompanied by the tinkling or clinking of the bottles and other suspended pieces of the sculpture. Gallery assistant Lizzie told me that Ellis will have a full gallery show in September, so I will be looking forward to checking that out.

Stephen Powers Daily Metaltation
Daily Metaltations by Stephen Powers

We’ve seen a fun show by former-sign-painter-turned-graphic-artist Stephen Powers at Liner just this past summer and his work is colorful and full of dry humor.

Kris Kuksi Neo-Roman Opera House
Neo-Roman Opera House By Kris Kuksi

Ah, Kris Kuksi: He is just the best. Check out a detail of this insane work below.

Kris Kuksi Neo-Roman Opera House Detail

You could look at just one of Kuksi’s worlds within worlds sculptures for weeks and never see everything.

Jean-Pierre Roy The Long Shadow to Put to Use, Once Recognized
The Long Shadow to Put to Use, Once Recognized By Jean-Pierre Roy

The Joshua Liner show has one of Jean-Pierre Roy’s paintings of futuristic, urban dystopia. His work is always thought provoking.

Clayton Brothers Reality Waits for Natural Light Detail

The Clayton Brothers have contributed a dozen works to this show, which are mostly clustered in a row along the front of the gallery’s main desk. Here is a close up of two panels from this series, which is called Reality Waits for Natural Light. These paintings reminded me a bit of Brazilian street artists, Os Gemeos.

SWOON Thalassa (Pink Seahorse)
Thalassa (Pink Seahorse) by SWOON

Street artist SWOON contributed this nice piece.

Bottle Rocket Bouquet
Bottle Rocket Bouquet

I’m not sure who the artist of this painting is, but I liked that I was able to guess the title just from observing the contents of the picture.

Direct Address: An Inaugural Group Exhibition will be on Exhibit Through April 20th, 2013 at Joshua Liner Gallery, Located at 540 West 28th Street. Gallery Hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 11:00 AM – 6:00 PM.

Chris Burden’s Metropolis II at LACMA

LACMA Chris Burden Metropolis 2 Overhead View
Photo By Gail

While I was at the LA County Museum of Art this past December to see the Stanley Kubrick retrospective, I also enjoyed the experience of stumbling upon Chris Burden’s room-sized kinetic sculpture, Metropolis II – the focal points of which are 1,100 Hot Wheels cars.

Burden finished this scale cityscape, which took four years to build, in the Summer of 2011 and it was installed at LACMA that Fall. Although you can walk completely around Metropolis II from the floor of the exhibit room, you really need to climb the stairs to the catwalk-like balcony to see the action from above and fully appreciate what Burden was trying to convey. The frenetic movement of the tiny cars is hypnotizing.

In a statement at the exhibit’s opening, Burden expressed his hypothesis that, “The future of automobile transportation is that there won’t be drivers anymore.” The 1,100 customized Hot Wheels cars whirring through a city of building-block skyscrapers is a scale model of Burden’s vision for L.A.’s future: Cars that are swiftly autopiloted along pre-determined routes, moving ten times faster than they do today.

The cars are dramatically lifted eight feet in the air by a magnetized conveyor belt, then dispatched through the city on a roller coaster network of plastic roadways. The buildings are constructed with Legos and Lincoln Logs, Erector Sets and stacking slotted cards. A dozen out-of-the-box electric trains chug casually through the sculpture.

Due to the physical strain on both the sculpture and the fact that it must be physically monitored at all times to watch for “pileups,” Metropolis II runs for only one hour at a time, with a one hour break between sessions, from Friday through Sunday. The viewing schedule is below and no reservations are required:

Fridays
11:30–12:30 PM; 1:30–2:30 PM; 3:30–4:30 PM; 5:30–6:30 PM

Saturdays & Sundays
10:30 am–11:30 PM; 12:30–1:30 PM; 2:30–3:30 PM; 4:30–5:30 PM

LACMA is located at 5905 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, California 90036.