Tag Archive | Furniture

Eye On Design: Charlotte Perriand’s Revolving Armchair Circa 1928

Revolving Armchair
All Photos By Gail

In this design, partly inspired by an office swivel chair, Charlotte Perriand softened the rigidity of the tubular, chrome-plated frame with a stuff cushion resting on coil springs. Because the frame and the upholstery required considerable handwork, the chair was relatively expensive and manufactured in limited numbers. Perriand used such chairs in her own Paris apartment.

Revolving Armchair
This View More Closely Shows the Chair’s Curved Back Detailing

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

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Photos From DIFFA’s 20th Annual Dining By Design!

DIFFA Fight InstallationAll Photos By Gail

For this week’s Eye on Design, we are presenting a fabulous visual recap of the 20th annual Dining By Design event, sponsored by Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS (DIFFA).

DIFFA Signage
Event Signage Outside Pier 92, Where the Event Takes Place

Held in tandem with the Architectural Digest Design Show, Dining By Design showcases imaginative, one-of-a-kind tabletop design in a series of dazzling dining installations by internationally renowned and local talent. Items in each dining tableau, as well as one-of-a-kind original artworks, are part of a silent auction fundraiser, in which everyone can participate. As DIFFA National’s largest fundraiser, Dining By Design raises nearly a million dollars annually, with proceeds going towards grants to organizations combating HIV/AIDS.

DIFFA Signage

Please enjoy photos of a few of our favorite installations!

White Room Installation

White Room by The New School at Parsons School of Design: Meal is constructed of found materials from each borough of New York City, allowing the projected materials costs to be donated back to HIV/AIDS activism. Unified in one color, the assemblage serves as an analogy for the many New Yorkers affected by HIV/AIDS. Built by a community to give back to a community.

White Room Detail
White Room Detail

The New York Times

The New York Times Designed by Liaigre, with Douglas Little.

The New York Times

The New York Times Detail

Pratt Interior Design Movers and Shakers
Pratt Interior Design: Movers and Shakers

M Moser Associates Installation featuring the Vondom Adan Planter

M Moser Associates Installation featuring the Vondom Adan Planter (seen here as the Table Base) by Italian architect and designer Teresa Sapey, which was a featured item up for bid in the silent.

Love By Silver Lining

Interior Design Produced By Silver Lining (Love Table).

Love By Silver Lining Detail

Moss Covered Table Installation

It is unfortunate that what turns out to be my best set of photos is of an installation whose designer and associated details I somehow neglected to take note of.

Moss Covered Table

Antique mirror place settings are embedded in a natural moss-covered table surface for ‘Green’ Dining at its finest — very cool!

Reaction

Perkins and Will with Steelcase and Other Sponsors: (Re)action

One in 8 people living with HVI do not know it. The Pulley system symbolizes the human effort needed to promote awareness and prevention. Illumination is achieved through action. Active participation in the fight for prevention and cure is key for enlightenment.

Reaction
(Re)action, Detail

Cappellini Designed by Giulio Cappellini and Antonio Facco

Installation by Cappellini, Designed by Giulio Cappellini and Antonio Facco.

Cappellini Detail

Ed Granger

This showcase by Twyla featured original abstract paintings by Architect-turned-Artist Edward Granger. Mystify, (2017 ) seen above, left, was part of the auction as well.

Mystify By Ed Granger

These elegant yet comfy-looking low banquets were custom made for the installation.

Desert at Dusk lush Landscapes by Ovando

Beautiful flora including succulents, cacti and air plants were expertly arranged into pieces of living art for an entire wall of this dining space, Desert at Dusk Lush Landscapes by Ovando  (donated by Ovando and Rockwell Group). Landscapes are designed in elegant 10”x10” black plate glass boxes.
Desert at Dusk lush Landscapes by Ovando

Here’s a better look at the really fantastic desert garden wall. All plants were available to own via the silent auction.

Poltrona Frau

Furnishings by Poltrona Frau are features in this showcase designed by Benjamin Noriega Ortiz, with LASVIT Lighting and Orley Shabahang carpets.

Poltrona Frau

Here are separate, but more detailed shots of the left and the right sides of this installation. I really love the Rooster mural!

Poltrona Frau

Anteriors

Design featuring Anteriors inspired furnishings.

Anteriors Bottle Detail
Anteriors Detail Shot

Fight

Fight Club Logo-inspired Design by Gensler, featuring Knoll Furniture with assistance from contract furnishings company EvensonBest.

Gensler and Knoll with Evenson BestRoche Bobois By Gensler Full

Known for its sofas and sectionals, French designer furniture company Roche Bobois provided the  vibrantly-colored cushioned seating that covers the walls of this dining installation, created by Gensler.

Roche Bobois By Gensler

What an original, wildly imaginative design approach!

Roche Bobois By Gensler

Projection of Ocean on Scrim

The immersive, 360-degree scrim over the table features a kinetic projection of ocean waves, so that you can feel like you’re dining at the beach! Excellent!

DIFFA Signage

Find out more about DIFFA and its sponsored events, at Diffa Dot Org!

Eye On Design: Chaise Lounge LC/4, Collaborative Design

Chaise Lounge LC/4
Photos By Gail

Inspired by bentwood rocking chairs by Michael Thonet, and recumbent doctor’s chairs, the angle of repose on this Chaise Lounge LC/4 (1928)  is adjusted by sliding the chromed steel frame on its stationary base. The LC/4 was a collaborative design of Le Corbusier (Charles-Edouard Jeanneret), Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand, spearheaded by  Perriand, who had designed other furnishings in tubular steel before joining Le Corbusier’s studio. The model was prominently displayed in numerous exhibition settings designed by Perriand, including the 1929 Paris Salon d’Automne and the Internationale Raumausstellung in 1931 in Cologne.
Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Chaise Lounge LC/4 Installation View
Installation View

Eye On Design: Daybed By New Tendency

Daybed By New Tendency
All Photos By Gail

When I first saw this minimal-yet-gorgeous modern Daybed, I thought I might choose it as a Pink Thing of the Day, but ultimately its functionality swayed me towards the week’s featured design post. Spotted as part of Chamber Boutique’s latest collection, Berlin-based design practice New Tendency has developed a daybed made from honed stainless steel and hand-selected, pure vegan tanned leather. I’m not sure if the cushion is available in other colors, but I think the pale pink looks just perfect against the silver-toned, brushed metal finish. You could build so many looks around this piece.

Daybed By New Tendency
DayBed Shown Here with Cannit Bin and Shelter

New Tendency applies modernist design principles onto the everyday contemporary objects. In Bauhaus tradition, they create products characterized by conceptual design, clean aesthetics and functional form, all handcrafted in Germany. The collection of furniture and accessories develops under the creative direction of Manuel Goller, and consists of original products developed with associate Sebastian Schonheit, as well as collaborations with selected designers and architects such as Clemens Tissi, and others.

Daybed By New Tendency

Eye On Design: Glass Armchair by Shiro Kuramata

Glass Armchair
Photographed By Gail in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum

In the mid-to-late 20th century, an atmosphere of innovation and a desire to question the tenets of modernism led some designers to explore a variety of ways in which to shape space. American Architect and Designer Alexander Hayden Girard utilized color and pattern in textiles, particularly in this colorful abstract, or folk art-inspired work for Herman Miller.

Glass Armchair at Albertz Benda
Photographed at Albertz Benda Gallery

By 1970, Japanese Architect and Interior Designer  Shiro Kuramata (1934 – 1991) was introducing alternative materials such as acrylic and industrial plate glass into his furniture. Utilizing a newly developed adhesive, Kuramata achieved material and visual minimalism with this Glass Armchair (1976). Flat planes of glass are bonded together along their edges, without mounts or screws, to create a functional chair that seems simultaneously visible and invisible. The transparent form invites users to question notions of materiality, utility and comfort.

Eye On Design: Stylaire Kitchen Stepladder

Stylaire Kitchen Stepladder
All Photos By Gail

Utility meets design is this Stylaire Kitchen Stepladder (circa 1950) designed and manufactured by Cosco Home and Office Products. I photographed this piece in the visible storage rooms at the Brooklyn Museum because t reminded me of one just like this that we had in our house when I was growing up (60s – 70s). Nostalgia! Part chair, part step stool, this design was inspired midcentury by the traditional library step-chair, and is still manufactured by Cosco today.

Stylaire Kitchen Stepladder

Eye on Design: Area Lamp (Model 1112) By Neal Small

Area Lamp By Neal Small
Photos By Gail

Dubbed the Prince of Plastic by the New York Times, Neal Small (b. 1937) lead a craze in the late 1960s for sculptural lighting and furniture made from plastic and acrylic. “I like to think of it as all part of the new permissiveness,” he commented. ‘I Know that I am being more permissive with myself and the designs I allow myself to make — making fuller, more sensuous things. People are permitting themselves in every area, whether it’s music, with the Beatles and the Stones, architecture or clothes. They are allowing themselves things that please them personally. You don’t have to invest in things forever anymore. Lighting is getting to be an art form”

 Area Lamp (model 1112), 1966 -67 was Photographed by 122design in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Area Lamp By Neal Small