Tag Archive | Furniture

Eye On Design: Slice Armchair By Mathias Bengtsson

Slice Chair
All Photos By Gail

The undulating form of Mathias Bengtsson’s plywood Slice Armchair is inspired by cutting-edge technology and organic forms found in nature. Bengtsson initiated the design in 1999 and originally executed it in clay. He then used a computer to analyze the shape and precision-cut hundreds of plywood slices, each a unique shape and just a few millimeters thick, which he stacked and laminated to form the sculptural chair. The result is a contemporary take on furniture made from traditional material, combing high-tech manufacturing methods and handcrafting.

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

Slice Chair Detail
Slice Armchair Detail

Eye On Design: The Tongue Chair

Tongue Chair
Tongue Chair on Display at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum (All Photos By Gail)

With its curvilinear form, the Tongue Chair (1967), designed by Pierre Paulin (1927 – 2009) demonstrates the innovative construction methods and synthetics that allowed Paulin to make highly sculptural upholstered furniture in the 1960s. His forms foretell those of plastic furniture in the latter half of the decade.

Tongue Chair
Tongue Chair Photographed as Part of a Modern Design Display at Museum of Modern Art

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Eye On Design: Stereo Cabinet By Achille Castiglioni

Castiglioni Stereo Cabinet
All Photos By Gail

In 1965, Achille Castiglioni (Italian, 1918 – 2002) created Model RR-126, a striking, modular stereo system that was based on pure geometry of a perfect cube, which could be combined in multiple configurations. The wheeled base provides an element of portability, while the graphic patterns of the speaker grilles and sound controls offer a bold, modern visual statement.

Achille Castiglioni Stereo Cabinet

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.

Eye On Design: Chariot Mobile Table

Chariot Mobile Table
All Photos By Gail

What kitchen or dining area would fail to make a  statement with something like this in the room? The Chariot Rullebord (2012) is a mobile table/trolley  consisting of three simple elements joined together: wheels, trays and structure. The wheels, which in common carts are usually small, are brought to the extreme size, becoming the iconic element of the project.  This fantastic piece, shown here in its eye-grabbing  bright Red finish, is designed by Copenhagen-based firm Gamfratesi and manufactured from lacquered MDF board, metal and rubber by Casamania in Milan, Italy.

Chariot Mobile Table

Photographed in the Designmuseum in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Ken Price, Drawings at Matthew Marks Gallery

Where Women Rule
Where Women Rule By Ken Price All Photos By Gail)

Matthew Marks Gallery is currently hosting a retrospective of thirty-four Drawings from the estate of  Ken Price,  most on view for the first time. If you are not familiar with the work of the late ceramic artist and printmaker, this exhibit is an excellent introduction.

Untitled (Geometric Cup and Interior)
Untitled (Geometric Cup and Interior)

“I’ve been drawing since I can remember,” Price has said. “I think sculptors learn to draw so that they can see what they’ve been visualizing.” His earliest works on paper explore forms and colors for his abstract sculptures, as seen in the Specimen drawings of the early 1960s. Price also drew impossible objects, like cups with a leaping frog or a cavorting nude for a handle. In his drawings of the late 1960s and early 1970s, the imaginary spaces inhabited by these objects became more fully realized.

Two Sofas
Two Sofas

Price’s drawings provide a counterpoint to his sculptures while imagining a world they might inhabit. Two Sofas (1991), for example, shows an imaginary domestic interior with a view of anonymous downtown high-rises. A semi-fictional Los Angeles appears in several drawings, complete with clogged freeways and palm-studded skylines.

Blue Interior
Blue Interior

Installation View
Installation View

Nature became the dominant force in the drawings from the early 2000s, which feature erupting volcanoes and turbulent seas inspired by Price’s trips to Hawaii. After his 2002 move to Taos, New Mexico, Price focused more on the high-desert scenery of rocky outcroppings, dramatic sunsets, and isolated trailer homes.

Figurine Cup (Study for Silkscreen)
Figurine Cup (Study for Silkscreen)

He also began depicting his sculptural forms in nature, re-imagining them as monumental figures in the primordial landscape. The effect is both comic and mysterious, like his sculptures themselves — embodying, in the words of Lucy Lippard, “a beautiful and rather horrible strangeness that appeals to both the mind and the senses.”

Ken Price passed away in 2012 at the age of 77.

Ken Price, Drawings will be on Exhibit Through June 25th, at Matthew Marks Gallery, Located at 2016 523 West 24th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Signage

Interior
Interior

Eye On Design: Cabinet Inspired By The Art of Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley Cabinet
Photo By Gail

I had the most amazing time at the Architectural Digest Design Show a few weeks back, and photographed so many great pieces that will eventually end up in this blog. Here’s one of them: a liquor cabinet designed by Zelouf + Bell that was inspired by the fabulous Op Art of painter Bridget Riley — and you know how much we love her here at The Gig.

Bridget Riley Cabinet

Here’s the reveal…wait for it…

Bridget Riley Cabinet

OMG, so cool! Zelouf + Bells specializes in bespoke art furniture. Visit them online at Zelouf and Bell Dot Com.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Herter Brothers Armchair

Velvet Armchair
Photo By Gail

Each time Geoffrey and I visit The Met, we end up in a section of the Museum that we’ve not only never seen before, but often have no idea that it even existed. On our last exhibit, we randomly wandered into the Art Furniture Galleries (or whatever they’re called), and that was fairly mind blowing. Check out this very ornate, and still quite comfy-looking, pink velvet armchair, which was once owned by William H. Vanderbilt, where it was part of a lavish drawing room. Designed and manufactured by Herter Brothers circa 1881-82, the chair features gilded wood, with beautiful mother-of-pearl inlay details (clearly visible in the photo above), still has its original patterned, pink velvet upholstery, and is simply stunning.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.