Tag Archives: fabric

4 Tips for Cleaning a Bean Bag Chair

yellow bean bag chair
Photo by zaid mohammed on Pexels.com

Keeping your bean bag chair clean doesn’t have to be difficult. On many styles, the outer cover can simply be removed and be washed with your regular laundry; but there are other ways you can keep them clean too. Here are four useful tips for washing a bean bag chair.
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Modern Art Monday Presents: Sam Gilliam, Carousel State

carousel state photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

Liberated from its stretcher, Carousel State (1968) explores the material and chromatic possibilities of canvas, a traditional painting support. Gilliam developed his unique approach in the 1960s while working with the Washington Color School, whose compositions emphasized the flatness of the picture plane. This is an early example of the artist’s signature ‘Drape Paintings,” made through a novel process of dripping, smearing, staining, and splashing paint onto raw canvas.

Colors often spread and merged as Gilliam pressed and folded the fabric. He has described this as a kind of equilibrium: “This liquidity of the colors is reinforced by the fluidity of the canvas.” The final step in the creation of Carousel State is its installation, suspended and extending into space.

carousel state detail photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Felt By Robert Morris

pink felt by robert morris 2 photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail Worley

Felt works by Robert Morris, including this piece entitled Pink Felt (1970) embody his notion of Anti-Form. Instead of executing a predetermined design, Morris allowed the final outcome of a sculpture to be determined as much by his simple actions (cutting and draping the material) as by gravity and chance.

pink felt by robert morris detail photo by gail worley
Pink Felt, Detail

A departure from earlier, unitary geometric forms of the Minimalist sculptures that the created in the 19603, Morris’s felt works, including Pink Felt, foreground the physical qualities of his materials and the artist’s physical process.

pink felt installation view photo by gail worley
Installation View

“Disengagement with preconceived enduring forms and orders for things is a positive assertion,” the artist writes in his 1968 essay, Anti Form. “It is part of the work’s refusal to continue estheticizing form by dealing with it as a prescribed end.”

Photographed in the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.

pink felt by robert morris photo by gail worley

Extend Your Summer Vibe With Lifestyle Accessories From Pomchies!

Pomchies Accessories
All Photos By Gail Except Where Noted

Back to School: three little words that stir anxiety in the young and the young-at-heart. Nobody wants summer to end, but while you can’t stop time, you can keep your summer vibe alive by adding Pomchies accessories to your back-to-school shopping list. Established in 2002, Pomchies is a line of fun fashion, home and lifestyle accessories with amazingly practical uses.

Original Pomchie
Image Courtesy of Pomchies

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Ilona Keserü, Wall-Hanging with Tombstone Forms

Wall-Hanging with Tombstone Forms
Photo By Gail

Ilona Keserü belongs to a generation of Hungarian artists that emerged in the wake of the Revolution of 1956, which had resulted in restrictions on officially acceptable art and suspicion of avant-garde art produced in Western styles — particularly abstraction. Keserü and other Hungarian artists flourished in abstract modes, despite this marginalization. A vibrant unframed tapestry, Wall-Hanging with Tombstone Forms (1969) exemplifies her desire to merge modern abstraction with references to Hungarian folk culture, making something with local resonance out of an otherwise international vocabulary of hard-edge painting. The undulating, toothlike motif recurring throughout the composition relates to artists study of gravestones at the Balatonudvari Cemetery, southwest of Budapest.

Photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.