Tag Archive | 2019

Eye On Design: Glass Block Couch By Arcana Furniture & Lighting

Glass Block Couch
All Photos By Gail

It didn’t take long for me to spot the clear favorite piece of the entire 2019 Architectural Digest Design Show. This Glass Block Couch from Arcana Furniture & Lighting of NYC had the entire show buzzing!

Installation View
Installation View

Designed by sculpture Jack Erikkson and meticulously hand-crafted from architectural glass block and powder-coated steel window guard, with a chartreuse velvet cushion, the couch is not only eye-catching but also very comfortable to sit on (you better believe I tried it out). I can’t stop Looking at it.

Glass Block Coach Detail
Detail

What a fantastic addition this piece would make to any modern decor. Dustin John, Jack’s architect partner in Arcana, explained that the piece is meant to fuse two  common building materials, glass block and steel — both traditionally exterior finishes — in one furniture piece.  “We’re interested in the creative mid-use of the elements, slicing two materials down to a furniture scale and making it work,” he told me.

Cropped Shot

The price of the couch is $15,000 wholesale, if there are any architect / designers reading this who are looking for the ideal statement piece for a well-off client!  Subscribe to updates from Arcana by visiting This Link!

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Mark Manders Tilted Head at Doris C. Freedman Plaza

Tilted Head Front View
All Photos By Gail

Mark Manders’ Tilted Head is a work of fiction. It has the appearance of unfired clay combined with everyday objects but in fact is made entirely of cast bronze. The cracks and fissures that cover its surface imply an organic process of drying and decay, yet its metal form is fixed.

Tilted Head 1

It might suggest an incomplete model, abandoned in the artist’s studio, if not for the fact that its colossal size and civic location lend it the air of a grand monument. Eyes shut, the androgynous figure’s mask-like features are at rest, undisturbed by an abrupt slice through a third of its face. The unfinished side of the head is held as if in a splint by wooden planks, one tied with rope.

Tilted Head Rear View

At the back, chairs and a suitcase, all slightly reduced in size, protrude from a mass of formless material. These shifts in scale, unexplained objects, and trompe l’oeil bronze effects alter our perception and spark the imagination.

Tilted Head Back Detail
Back of Sculpture, Detail

Mark Manders (b. 1968, The Netherlands) has been interested in the human figure throughout his career, and is particularly fascinated with the head, which he sometimes depicts detached from the body and juxtaposed with different elements. These heads are always stylized representations rather than individualized portraits.

Tilted Head Side View

His approach creates a paradoxical sense of both immediacy and timelessness, of something newly made with fresh clay yet belonging to the traditions of classical statuary. With Tilted Head, Manders has rendered a compelling fiction of human form that inhabits a poetic space between representation and abstraction, serenity and rupture, life and mortality.

Tilted Head Right Side View

Mark Manders’ Tilted Head is Curated by Public Art Fund Director & Chief Curator Nicholas Baume. It Will be on Display at the Doris C. Freedman Plaza, Fifth Avenue and 60th Street, Adjacent to Central Park, Through September 1st, 2019.

Video Clip of The Week: Swervedriver, “Spiked Flower”


‘Transcendent’ is not a world that I find myself using very often these days when talking about modern music, if I talk about it at all. I looked at the Billboard charts a couple months ago for the first time in probably a decade — just being serious — and when I realized that every band or artist in the top 20 or so positions on that chart was either someone I’ve never heard of, or someone I am familiar enough with to have a strong distaste for their songs, I knew l’d made the right decision to abandon rock journalism and start writing about art and food. Because I would rather listen to The Beatles or Led Zeppelin for one hundred million billion years than any of the boring, shitty, derivative, eardrum excoriating garbage that ‘the kids’ are downloading for 15 minutes. Fuck the kids.

Of course, it’s not that everything sucks, but the really good stuff is now back in the underground, and this is why it takes me a week to uncover even one song worth featuring in this column. Fortunately, hard work pays off. This week’s clip, “Spiked Flower,” comes to us from the band Swervedriver, who were being pitched to me when you were in diapers: when I was cranking out CD reviews and long-form interviews with top musicians at a pretty steady clip. How are they still around, and how do they still sound so fucking good? “Spiked Flower” is song that’s transcendence distilled, and I don’t even feel compelled to defend it beyond offering that it sounds like if Husker Du had a baby with the Jesus and Mary Chain. Sometimes the only quality that good music has to have to is that it sounds good“Spiked Flower” can be found on Swervedriver’s upcoming album, Future Ruins — earning bonus points for featuring Coney Island’s iconic Parachute Drop and Thunderbolt roller coaster on its cover — which will be released on January 25th, 2019 on Dangerbird Records. Enjoy!

future ruins hi-res cover

Welcoming 2019!

Dec 31 Subway Tile
Photo By Gail

The New Year’s Eve tile above is part of Times Square Times: 35 Times, a public artwork commissioned from Ceramic sculptor Toby Buonagurio by the MTA Arts for Transit. It is permanently installed in illuminated presentation windows embedded in the glass block passageway walls throughout the Times Square – 42nd Street Subway Station. The artworks are owned by the MTA New York City Transit. However you choose to celebrate this evening, have fun , be safe and stay cozy warm!

Happy New Year and All The Best for 2019!