Tag Archive | LED

Pink Thing of The Day: Emby Pink Flower Lamp

Pink Tulip Nightlight 1
All Photos By Gail

On the lookout for cool Pink Things at the ICFF, we spotted this ‘illuminating’ design by UIC student Maria Diamond. Emby, a bud-shaped sculptural lamp, is made from fluorescent pink sheets of acrylic. This type of acrylic is unique in that it has colored edges that have a natural glow to them. Its light source — an LED puck light that is also covered by acrylic — was placed to shine downwards into the acrylic, forcing it to refract through the curves and the etched contours of this organic form. Inspired by the form of a flower, the acrylic was heated and shaped in a way that best-defined the edges, to create a rosy glowing lamp. Stunning!

Pink Emby Lamp 2

I contacted Maria via email, and she provided additional background on the piece:

“The project brief was to select a material from a list given to us as students, and then come up with a house good that best exemplifies the properties of that material. In my case, what is unique about acrylic is that some [types] have colored edges that have an inherent glow. Acrylic is also a thermoplastic, so I laser cut a flower-inspired shape from the sheet of acrylic and cooked it in my oven, which allowed me to bend the petals upward, as I wanted to highlight the petals’ edges.”

Pink Emby Lamp 3

The designer continues, “I thought it was interesting to have the puck light be its own piece, because most people would assume the central placement of a light would shine up and out of a form. Instead, I did the opposite; that, when turned on, the source of light providing the natural glow from the edges is questioned. Maria is selling this design for $180 and is open to making additional lamps in different colors. You can contact her by leaving a message in comment section!

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Hive Light Installation at Bleecker Street Subway Station

Hive Subway Art
Hive Light Installation at Bleecker Street Station, Installed 2012. (All Photos By Gail)

While I am often traveling through the 6 Train station at Bleecker Street, I am almost never originating or concluding a ride at that stop. That is my excuse for taking four years to write about one of the coolest — if not the coolest – piece of art in the entire NYC subway system, which is called Hive (Bleecker Street).

Artist Leo Villareal created the LED art, currently installed at the Bleecker Street subway station, in 2012. Made of LED tubes, custom software, electrical hardware, aluminum and stainless steel, the LED sculpture takes the form of a honeycomb, above the stairs that mark the transfer point connecting the IRT and IND subway lines.

Hive Red

Bright colors, outlining each hexagonal honeycomb shape, move across the sculpture. Villareal created an unprecedented art experience for transit riders who use the station with the installations use of technology and LEDs. Hive (Bleecker Street) has a playful aspect in its reference to games. Riders will be able to identify individual elements within a larger context, and track this movement.

Hive Subway Art

The work explores the compulsion to recognize patterns and the brain’s hard-coded desire to understand and make meaning. The patterns also take inspiration from the research of the mathematician John Conway, who invented the Game of Life, the best-known cellular automata program. Hive (Bleecker Street) speaks to a diverse audience – it is abstract and evocative, and can have many different meanings.

Hive

Hive

Hive Subway Art

Through changing patterns presented in randomized progression, Hive creates an experience for riders . Overall, the piece resonates with the activity of the station, transportation network and the city itself. The work was fabricated by Parallel Development.

Hive Subway Art

The best photos of Hive (Bleecker Street) are taken from the stairs or escalator below the installation, but I was waiting for a train late at night and did not want to miss it, so took these photos and video from the platform. If I get better photos in the future, I will add them to this post!

Hive

 

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Surface Tension Bubbles Lamp By Front

Four Bubbles
All Photos By Gail

Swedish design firm Front’s Surface Tension Lamp (2014) was the result of a collaboration with the Dutch design firm Booo. Asked to create a light that used LED technology, the group took a counter-intuitive approach.

Three Bubbles Long Shot

LED bulbs last an extremely long time, so [they wondered] could the lampshade itself be temporary? Front came up with a perfect symbol of ephemerality: the bursting soap bubble

Three Bubbles Different Angle

The three members of Front, Sofia Lagerkvist, Charlotte von der Lancken and Anna Lindgren met while studying industrial design at Konstfack, Stockholm’s leading art school. As a trio of women, they have attracted attention in an industrial design world still overwhelmingly populated by men, but they do not feel that gender is necessarily a part of their work’s content.

Two Bubbles
Three Bubbles

On display at the Museum of Arts and Design in Columbus Circle, Manhattan, the Surface Tension Lamp produces bubbles intermittently throughout the day.

Fallen Bubbles

Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery Presents New Work By Jim Campbell

Jim Campbell New Works
All Photos By Gail

Art and Light —  they go together. We were very excited to visit Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery for its new exhibition of new work by Jim Campbell, which opened March 7th, 2014. The show focuses on the pioneering artist’s most recent series of sculptural light installations. Campbell is considered one of the leading artists working today in the field of new media and his work is both fun and fascinating.

Jim Campbell New Works

Jim Campbell New Works

Many of Campbell’s works are motion sensitive to the activity in the gallery, so the images displayed will change as visitors move around or in front of the pieces.

Jim Campbell New Works Ceiling

This one is suspended from the ceiling.

Jim Campbell New Works Wall Installation

The exhibition at Bryce Wolkowitz coincides with Jim Campbell’s first New York museum retrospective. Organized by the Museum of the Moving Image, Jim Campbell: Rhythms of Perception, on view from March 21 – June 15, 2014, spans three decades with an emphasis on his early experimental work. I will have to check that out.

Jim Campbell Singage

New Work By Jim Campbell will be on Exhibit Through April 19th, 2014 at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, Located at 505 W 24th Street, In the Chelsea Gallery District.