Tag Archives: landscape

Modern Art Monday Presents: The Source of the Loue By Gustave Courbet

the source of the loue by gustave courbet photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Gustave Courbet (18191877) often painted the rocky grotto at The Source of the Loue (1854), the river that flows through his native village, Ornan, in the French-Comte region of eastern France.  This view is probably one of four he mentioned to the art dealer Jules Luquet in the spring of 1864 when he wrote, “I’ve been to the source of the Loue these last days and made four landscapes [measuring] about 1 meter 40.”

Photographed in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Diego Rivera, Cubist Landscape

cubist landscape diego rivera photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Cubist Landscape (1912) was inspired by a trip that Diego Rivera made to Spain on 1911, where he encountered the olive trees of Catalonia. The serrated blue ridge in the painting evokes Montserrat, a mountain in the region. The work exemplifies the idiosyncratic approach to Cubism that Rivera developed in the 1910s, when he lived in Paris. He saw these early works, which combine a sun-drenched palette with kaleidoscopic planes and abstract patterning, as a way of beginning to forge a specifically Mexican modernism. “My Cubist paintings,” he said, “are my most Mexican.”

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Marc Chagall, Cubist Landscape

Cubist Landscape
Photo By Gail

This work, Cubist Landscape (1919) by Marc Chagall (18871985)  illustrates the artist’s relationship to the Suprematist avant-garde at the time. Its disjointed geometrical shapes and use of heterogenous materials to create texture originated in Cubo-Futurism. One of the steps leading to Suprematism according to Kazimir Malevich’s theory of art, this style privileged movement, fragmented forms and bold colors. In the composition, geometric forms overtake a figure carrying an umbrella in front of Vitebsk School — perhaps a stand-in for the artist, protecting himself from the Suprematist storm. To the left of this figure, in a scene typical of Chagall’s shtetls (a small town with a large Jewish populations), a man with a goat makes a faint appearance. The artist repeats this name endlessly across the canvas, humorously illustrating the gulf between his painterly poetics and the stark Suprematist creations of his rival Malevich, who advocated collective art.

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit Chagall, Lissitzky, Malevich: The Russian Avant-Garde in Vitebsk, 1918-1922, On View Through January 6th, 2019, at the Jewish Museum in Manhattan.

Pastizal Landscape Carpet By Alexandra Kehayoglou

Pastizal Carpet
This Image Source. All Other Photos By Gail.

It had been a few months since my last trip to Chamber when I popped in last week before an opening and found the store has all new merchandise! New Stuff – Yay!

Of course, it was hard to miss this amazing, one-of-a-kind carpet by designer Alexandra Kehayoglou, which — as you can see by my photos — is definitely the focal point of the stores’ main showroom space.

Continue reading Pastizal Landscape Carpet By Alexandra Kehayoglou

Tiffany Stained Glass Window: Autumn Landscape

Tiffany Stained Glass Window
Autumn Landscape, 1923-24, Leaded Favrile Glass (Photo By Gail)

A tour de force of its medium, this window, executed late in Tiffany’s career, portrays the late afternoon sun filtered through a rich autumnal foliage. It was probably designed by Agnes Northrop (1857 – 1953), who was known especially for her landscapes and flowers.

No paint was used to add detail; rather, the modeling, texture and form were created solely with glass, using the full range developed at Tiffany Studios. The variegated surface was made by wrinkling glass it its molten state. Different color effects were achieved by embedding tiny, confetti-like flakes of glass in the surface. Plating – the superimposition of several layers of glass on the back of the window – added depth.

Although commissioned in 1923 by Loren D. Towle for the stair landing of his enormous neo-Gothic mansion in Boston, the window was never installed. In 1925, Robert W. de Forest, Tiffany’s close friend, donated the window to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where he was president and founder of the American Wing.

autumn landscape louis c tiffany photo by gail worley
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