Tag Archive | Gallery

Lee Sung-Kuen’s Interconnected at Waterfall Mansion

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected
All Photos By Gail

If you think you’ve been to every kind of cool art gallery in New York City, from the LES to Midtown, but you have not yet been to Waterfall Mansion, then now is a good time to add a visit to this uptown gem of an art destination to your bucket list. Waterfall Mansion, a Townhome only open to the public for a few hours each Saturday (and the rest of the week by appointment only) specializes in unique exhibits by Asian artists, really does have a two-story waterfall inside, but to really appreciate that distinguishing architectural feature you need to go in person.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Now through December 4th, Waterfall Mansion & Gallery presents Interconnected, the first major solo exhibition of renowned Korean artist, Lee Sung-KuenLee’s figurative works, which represent organic life and growth, are composed of thin, short-length wires and brightly colored knots.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

The netted steel volumes that he produces juxtapose the heaviness of metal and the light, creating a fluid dynamic between shape and space that both penetrates and expands the space the work inhabits.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

In an effort to harmonize material substance and immaterial space, Lee obliterates the distance between shape and space, and instead emphasizes the shifting mobility and elasticity of his pieces. In this way, the pieces do not form or become an object, but instead permeate and adapt to their surroundings, enriching the space around it and creating a unique sculpture of situation.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

The sculptures do feel very organic and can be seen as perhaps having been inspired by sea sponges and aquatic plants as well as microcosmic material.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

This cluster of three hanging sculptures reminded me of cocoons.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

The Waterfall Atrium is also filled with colorful suspended sculptures. The look a bit like jelly bean-shaped clouds.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

This piece is on the second floor and is the only one that is what I would call “representational.”

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

These look like a group of desert cacti.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

This fun exhibit is a good introduction to the Waterfall Mansion aesthetic. Try to make it uptown before the show ends on December 4th.

Waterfall Mansion and Gallery is Located at 170 East 80th Street (Between Third and Lex) in NYC. The Gallery is only open to the public on Saturdays from Noon – 5 PM, so plan accordingly. Visit This Link for more information.

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected Detail

Sung Keun Lee Interconnected

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Kim Joon, Crashing at Waterfall Mansion

Waterfall Room
All Photos By Gail

I don’t remember how I first heard of NYCs Waterfall Mansion and Gallery, but I know it was a place that I discovered completely by accident. And I admit that I became distracted enough to have I forgotten about it for maybe a year before I got inspired a few weeks ago to look it up again on the interwebs and plan a visit.

Waterfall Mansion Front

Kim Joon Crashing Signage

Of course, when I saw that they are currently hosting an exhibit art by Korean digital artist Kim Joon and that the ranking hostingów will be hosting their site, I got extra excited, because his work is amazing, and I am a huge fan!

Forest Paul
Forest Paul

With Crashing, Kim continues his mastery of the 3D Studio Max software, which he uses to manipulate his fantastic, hyper-surreal images — composed of body parts and patterned skins, or “tattoos” — in new and exciting ways. His art is so unique and very beautiful.

Forest-Green Day
Forest-Green Day

These new pieces, which were created specifically for the Waterfall Mansion and Gallery space, focus on the theme of tension and balance between our current identity and who we wish to be. Kim uses tattoo-like images and artificial skin textures on computer generated bodies and creates a crash of identities.

Forest-Monkey
Forest-Monkey

Using tattoo as a form of expression, Kim reveals deeply imprinted desires, and the obsessions that are on his mind. In his early works, to demonstrate repression towards individuals under social convention, he created a discourse on the relationship of body and tattoo, which was a cultural taboo, and still legally restricted in Korea.

Forest-Pink
Forest-Pink

Kim began reproducing tattoos on digital flesh in the early aughts, using motifs such as clouds, dragons, and traditional symbols, as well as luxurious brand labels mapped on human body, causing a friction of shape, texture, and pattern.

Forest-Pink Lady
Forest-Pink Lady

In the series Blue Jean Blues, the body became more fragile by being made of ceramic. Recently, as seen in Somebody, which also exhibited at the Sundaram Tagore Gallery in Chelsea in 2014, and Forest, the bodies are fragmented and distorted. This hybrid form creates uncanny and uncomfortable balancing acts by crashing the real vs. fake, old vs new, who we want to be vs. who we are, self-definition vs. cultural expectations.

This video work, Pink Bubble, is part of the Crashing exhibit at Waterfall Mansion.

Kim Joon invites the viewer into the crashing of his own identities, to reflect upon their own tensions and conflicting forces of identity, and to reveal where true value in life is placed.

And let’s not forget to check out that waterfall!

Waterfall Mansion

Kim Joon’s Crashing will be on Exhibit Only Through Saturday, July 3oth, 2016, at Waterfall Mansion and Gallery, Located at 170 East 80th Street (Between Third and Lex) in NYC. The Gallery is only open to the public on Saturdays from Noon – 5 PM, so you just have one more day to see it. Visit This Link for more information.

She-Red Ear
She-Red Ear

Kim Joon Crashing

Favorite Art From the Affordable Art Fair!

Heidler & Heeps Vinyl Collection
Heidler & Heeps, Vinyl Collection (2014) At Bleach Box Gallery, London (All Photos By Gail)

The Affordable Art Fair, which took over two floors of the Metropolitan Pavilion from March 25th – 29th, may now be relegated to a cache of wonderful memories, but that doesn’t mean we can’t revisit some of the fantastic art we saw over several visits, or give a well-earned shout out to the many galleries from all over the globe who came together to make this such a successful and memorable event for all art lovers who attended.

Here are some of our favorite pieces and galleries from the show!

Tom Morosz Seven's Home
Tom Morosz, Seven’s Home, Fractal Optic Crystal at Ai Bo Gallery, Rye NY

Jacky Tsai War Skull
Jacky Tsai, War Skull (Jack of Spades), Eyestorm Online Gallery

Lucie Bennett Romy In Lights
Lucie Bennett, Romy In Lights, Eyestorm Online Gallery

Valerio Loi Instagram
Valerio Loi, Instagram at Artstar

Eom Hae Jo, Thesaurus III
Eom Hae Jo, Thesaurus III, Dura Artspace, Seoul South Korea

Yoo Sun Tai, Text and Word
Yoo Sun Tai, Text and Word, Dura Artspace, Seoul South Korea

Xavi Carbonell, Untitled
Xavi Carbonell, Untitled, Art Angler, New York City

Basquiat-esqe!

Reyka Vodka Bar

A special shout out goes to Reyka Vodka (my favorite), who sponsored Free Admission Friday and hosted an open bar on the second floor. Impulsive Drunk Art Buying! Woo!

Miniature Balloon Dog
Miniature Jeff Koons Balloon Dog, Karyn Mannix Contemporary, East Hampton, NY

The folks in the Karyn Mannix Contemporary booth, who were selling these adorable miniature replicas of Jeff Koons’ Balloon Dogs mounted on drink coaster-sized mirrors could be overhead chatting about how “Jeff Koons does not own the likeness of the Balloon Dog” and thus anyone should be able to do whatever the heck they want with it, and blah blah blah. They have a point, of course, and I am sure this argument holds water right up to litigation time!

Elvis By Keith Haynes
Elvis By Keith Haynes, Vinyl Sculpture, Will’s Art Warehouse, London UK

Happy Days Golden Clouds
Happy Days, 14K Gold-Glazed Porcelain Clouds, Michele Mariaud Gallery, NYC

Ryan Callanan Love is the Drug
Ryan Callanan, Love is the Drug, Tag Fine Arts, London, UK

Tag Fine Arts in London had one of our overall favorite booths, showcasing lots of eye-catching, contemporary pop art, with most pieces priced in the $2,000 range.

David Shrigley Brass Tooth
David Shrigley Brass Tooth, Tag Fine Arts

Tag Fine Arts Booth
Tag Fine Arts Booth

Tom Ungerer, Eat
Tom Ungerer, Eat at Artspace Online

Now You See Me By Nemp Jantzen
Now You See Me By Nemo Jantzen, Galerie Envie D’Art, Paris, France

Check out a detail shot of the above work, just below:

Now You See Me Detail

Yves Krief Mur n 159
Yves Krief, Mur n 159, Galerie Envie D’Art, Paris, France

Constellation V by Pedro Bonnin
Constellation V by Pedro Bonnin, Joanne Artman Gallery, Laguna Beach, CA

Where The Action is Mick by Robert Mars
Where The Action is Mick by Robert Mars, Joanne Artman Gallery, Laguna Beach, CA

She No 4 by Chamnan Chongpaiboon
She No 4 by Chamnan Chongpaiboon, La Lanta Fine Art, Bangkok, Thailand

Ninja Skull - Sakura, Shin Koyama
Ninja Skull – Sakura, Shin Koyama, La Lanta Fine Art, Bangkok, Thailand

Rock 'em Sock 'em by Nelson De La Nuez
Rock ’em Sock ’em by Nelson De La Nuez, Bruce Lurie Gallery, LA, CA

Jean-Marc Calvet, El Viaje
Jean-Marc Calvet, El Viaje at MZ Urban Art, NYC

Jealous Gallery Booth

Finally, let’s make a pit-stop at another favorite exhibitor, Jealous Gallery, which has several locations in London, UK. It is probably no accident that this the booth where I ended up making a purchase.

Bowie and Madonna By Ragman
Bowie and Madonna By Ragman, Jealous Gallery, London, UK

Photo Opportunity Shocking Pink by Russell Marshall
Photo Opportunity – Shocking Pink by Russell Marshall

Simone Lia, I've Got No Brain
Simone Lia, I’ve Got No Brain

Such fun art! If you like something you’ve seen on this post, feel free to look up the galleries or the artists on the Google!

AAS Signage

Pink Thing of The Day: Soft Sculpture by Natsuko Hattori

Natsuko Hattori Soft Sculpture
Photos By Gail, Taken at Porter Contemporary Gallery in Brooklyn

Artist Statement:

Mocomoco  (もこもこ) is a Japanese word that refers to a soft or puffy surface and the comforting feelings that one might get from holding a toy stuffed animal, or being wrapped up in a down coat. Fabric is my medium of choice because people everywhere can relate more easily to this material, which conveys warmth, natural softness and the intimate human touch. The act of wrapping is central to my sculptures.

My sculptures are created from balls that are individually wrapped with fabric and bounded together to make up an entire whole. Each ball represents the inner state of mankind. The gesture of wrapping each round ball, is an act of transformation that converts pain, sadness and despair into positive energy, such as love or a prayer for comfort.<

My work conveys a sense of happiness and celebrates the human spirit.

— Natsuko Hattori

Natsuko Hattori Soft Sculpture

Detail from The Above Work

Dougherty Gallery at LIC’s Crescent Grill

Art By Robert Lobe
Currently on Exhibit: Surface Tension, a Solo Exhibition by Robert Lobe (All Photos By Gail)

In the heart of the booming Dutch Kills section of Long Island City, Crescent Grill is a modern American restaurant that’s been open for just over a year. The restaurant is already a local favorite and a destination for visitors to the Long Island City scene, and after just one visit you will know why. Located where a longtime industrial supply house once flourished, the fully restructured and renovated 100-seat space is a family enterprise with a total commitment to Long Island City. We dined there this past Friday evening (note: totally worth the trek from Manhattan) and both the food and service were just outstanding.

And what’s extra cool about Crescent Grill is that the front part of the space is home to the tiny Dougherty Gallery (named for owners and brothers, Daniel and Shaun Dougherty) which showcases work by local artists. Here are a few photos from the current exhibit, which features colorful and contemporary collage work by Robert Lobe.

Art By Robert Lobe

Art By Robert Lobe

Art By Robert Lobe

Art By Robert Lobe

As far as I know, all of the above works are for sale. Inquire about purchase and pricing at the restaurant.

Craig Alan Statue of Liberty
Statue of Liberty by Craig Alan

In addition to the exhibited work the gallery, the restaurant is a showcase in itself for custom fixtures and work from the personal collections of the Dougherty brothers. The painting above hangs near the bar.

Cresent Grill Custom Light Fixture

This gorgeous custom light fixture, made from reclaimed vintage glass shades, hangs in the dining room.

City Scape

A large scale photograph of the Long Island City Skyline is one of several compelling original works that add atmosphere to the main dining space, Daniel Dougherty told us that smaller prints of this photo are available for purchase through the restaurant. We will definitely be returning, not only to check out the new art exhibits, but also for the delicious food!

The Dougherty Gallery at Crescent Grill is located at 38-40 Crescent Street at 39th Avenue, LIC Queens, NY 11101. Phone 718-729-4040 or Visit Crescent Grill Dot Com for more information or to make a Reservation.

Erwin Wurm’s Synthesa at Lehmann Maupin

Erwin Wurm Gallery View
Synthesa Gallery View, All Photos By Gail

Mere seconds after entering Lehmann Maupin gallery for Erwin Wurm’s latest sculpture exhibit, Synthesa, we were already smiling from ear to ear. We first became acquainted with Wurm’s delightful sense of humor when his sculpture Big Kastenmann had its residency at the Standard Hotel in October of 2012, so it was lots of fun to experience an entire gallery full of works that express the Austrian artist’s unique world view.

Erwin Wurm Synthesa Sculpture
White Bucket (Synthesa), 2013

Synthesa is comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work. Those within the title series of the exhibition, Synthesa, continue Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. For these works, the artist works with the classical figure in the manner of a traditional sculptor yet drastically deconstructs and contorts each shape, inserting unexpected readymade objects to further the abstraction.

For Wurm, these works explore psychological conditions, manifested in the physiology of the human form. Here, Synthesa represents the synthesis of opposing forces, both physical and emotional, traditional and unexpected.

Kiss By Erwin Wurm
Kiss (Abstract Sculptures), 2013

Similarly, Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures challenge our accepted impressions of the world around us. For this series, the artist contorts sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures that evoke anthropomorphic physical qualities and movement. Pulling the reference from his daily life and childhood, Wurm re-envisions the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality. True to Wurm’s practice, these works are both familiar yet strange and evoke pause and contemplation from the viewer.

Black Weenie By Erwin Wurm

Erwin Wurm Skull Banana
One Minute Forever (Skull / Banana), 2013

The third series of sculptures is called One Minute Forever, inspired by his popular his One Minute Sculptures public performance art piece. Wurm evolves those works from instructive and performance-based ephemeral sculptures into One Minute Forever’s physically enduring series, in which Wurm re-imagines the original One Minute Sculptures using skeletal forms to convey the eternity of each pose.

Erwin Wurm Skeleton
One Minute Forever (Joghurt Cup), 2013

Through these works Wurm embraces the persistent yet fleeting nature of time and examines this force as a unifying factor of human existence.

Erwin Wurm Skeleton Legs Buckets

One Minute Forever (Bucket), 2013

Synthesa by Erwin Wurm will be on Exhibit Through April 19th, 2014 at Lehmann Maupin, Located at 540 West 26th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District. Gallery Hours are Tuesday to Saturday, 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM and Mondays by appointment.

Rob Fischer’s Good Weather (Glass House) at Derek Eller Gallery

Rob Fisher Good Weather Glass House
All Photos By Gail

OK, here is something you do not see every day in an art gallery: a Glass House. Fans of architecture, minimalism and Mondrian are going to be interested in viewing Rob Fisher’s Good Weather (Glass House), which fills an entire room at Derek Eller Gallery on West 27th Street.

Entry Seating and Counter Space
Entry Way, Seating on the Left, Shelf Space on the Right

According to text I took from the exhibit’s press release, Good Weather (Glass House) “is comprised of panes of glass, welded steel and re-purposed wood flooring. The piece contains many of the furnishings of a functional domicile but remains ambiguous about its habitability.”

Glass House Kitchen
Kitchen Sink and Stove Top

“Extensively re- configured and evolved from its original manifestation at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa, TX, Fischer’s Good Weather (Glass House) vacillates between utilitarian architecture and fine art object, reconstituting industrial-strength detritus with the outward appearance of fragile elegance.”

Glass House Bedroom
Sleeping Area

Stairs Decending from Sleeping Area
Stairs Descending from Sleeping Area

Living here in NYC, where everyone is always trying to out-do each other when it comes making the most with the smallest living space possible, I was intrigued by this structure and enjoyed walking through it to imagine what it might be like if you could actually live in it.

Work Area Below Bed
Work Area Below Bed

There is no doubt that exploring the structure stimulates the imagination and inspires a sense of adventure. Highly Recommended!

Rob Fischer’s Good Weather (Glass House) will be on Exhibit through April 19th, 2014 at Derek Eller Gallery, Located at 615 West 27th Street, between 11th and 12th Avenues. Hours are Tuesday – Saturday from 11:00 AM – 6:00 PM.

Rear View of Glass House