Tag Archive | Parking Lot

Nick Walker’s Love Vandal

Nick Walker Love Vandal Detail
All Photos By Gail

British artist Nick Walker painted this mural of his signature Love Vandal character in a parking lot at the southwest corner of 17th Street and 6th Avenue back in the fall of 2014, and it still looks great!

Nick Walker Love Vandal

Nick Walker Love Vandal

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William Eggleston’s The Democratic Forest at David Zwirner

Red Diner
All Photos By Gail

David Zwirner Gallery is currently hosting its first exhibition with William Eggleston since having announced the gallery’s exclusive worldwide representation of the artist. On view at the space on West 20th Street in New York are works from Eggleston’s monumental project The Democratic Forest.

Two Cars

Over the course of nearly six decades, Eggleston has established a singular pictorial style that deftly combines vernacular subject matter with an innate and sophisticated understanding of color, form, and composition. His photographs transform the ordinary into distinctive, poetic images that eschew fixed meaning.

Room Interior with Viewer

His 1976 solo exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, curated by John Szarkowski, marked the first presentation of color photography at the museum. Although initially criticized for its unfamiliar approach, the show and its accompanying catalogue, William Eggleston’s Guide, heralded an important moment in the medium’s acceptance within the art historical canon, and it solidified the artist’s position as one of its foremost practitioners to this date. Eggleston’s work continues to exert an influence on contemporary visual culture at large.

Pool

The Democratic Forest is among Eggleston’s most ambitious projects and a prime example of his uniquely recognizable aesthetic. Likened to an epic journey or an enduring narrative, it comprises a careful selection of works from over ten thousand negatives he took in the mid-1980s across the southern and eastern parts of America and in several European countries.

Road

These low profile casters of rural back roads, industrial and residential environs, architectural details, restaurant interiors, and parking lots, among other locales, eluded the conventions of both reportage and the black-and-white art photography practiced by many of the artist’s peers at the time, and instead shaped their own definition of what a photographic image could be—intuitive and charged with imaginative possibilities.

Cars with Viewer

Palm Tree

Collectively, the project echoes Eggleston’s predilection for the “democratic” vision of the camera, able to render equally what is in front of the lens.

Blue Picnic Table

The show will include over forty works from The Democratic Forest, the majority of which have not been exhibited previously. Although taken thirty years ago, the photographs appear to cast their subjects in a timeless light.

Diner Table

As the art historian Alexander Nemerov writes in a new catalogue published by David Zwirner Books/Steidl on the occasion of the show:

Eggleston’s work—the great flow of it— feels…impelled by the world. It feels, to put it another way, pulled along by the world, by things outside the artist, rather than compelled by something inside him….[O]ne feels him being borne along by a current… [T]he current [he] rides along is simply the proliferation of scenes — the great panoramic film strip of it, never ending in its flow of gas stations and horse buggies and parking lots and roadside trees and filigreed urns stamped in tin. But more than that…there is the feeling that the infiniteness of the world, the sheer extent of it, is its own kind of eternity.

Car Wash

William Eggleston was born in 1939 in Memphis, Tennessee, where he continues to live today.

William Eggleston Signage

William Eggleston’s The Democratic Forest will be on Exhibit Through December 17th, 2016 at David Zwirner Gallery, Located at 537 West 20th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Pink Snack Bar

Statue of Liberty Replica in Brooklyn Museum Parking Lot

Statue of Liberty Replica
All Photos by Gail

All of the Artworks in collection of the Brooklyn Museum aren’t necessarily inside the museum. For example, if you head outside and around the back of the building, you won’t be able to miss this replica of the Statue of Liberty, which has found a home in the Parking Lot that separates the Museum from the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. I saw it for the first time on my most recent visit in mid-August, 2015. Surprise!

A plaque affixed to this statue reads as follows, “Perhaps no American symbol is more widely recognized or powerfully expressive than “Liberty Enlightening the World”– the Statue of Liberty. Since 1885, when the 151-foot original created by the French sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi (1834 – 1904) was erected on Bedloe’s Island, the colossal figure was inspired numerous smaller-scale replicas intended to echo the ideals of freedom, tolerance, and opportunity that it embodied for many of the immigrants arriving at Ellis Island.

This 30 foot replica was commissioned around 1900 by the Russian-born auctioneer William H. Flatteau to sit atop his eighth story Liberty Warehouse (at 43 W. 64th St.), then one of the highest points on Manhattan’s Upper West Site. Flatteau thus combined the entrepreneurial spirit with pride in the adopted country in which he had prospered. Although squatter in proportion and less gracefully detailed than the massive original, Flatteau’s  replica retained something of the forceful gravity of expression achieved by Bartholdi.

Newly restored, this little Lady Liberty takes its place within the distinguished collection of outdoor sculpture and architecture fragments that the Brooklyn Museum began collecting about 1960, in an effort to preserve unique New York City treasures that were increasingly at risk.”

Statue of Liberty Replica
“She’s Actual Size, But She Looks Much Bigger to Me!”

Gilbert & George BillBoard at The High Line

Gilbert & George Highline Billboard
Photo By Gail

The newest commissioned artwork for the High Line Billboard just went up on September 3rd. This installation is a boldly-colored, stained glass-inspired Gilbert & George painting called Waking. The controversial art duo appear in the painting (from 1984) three times in the very center of the image and are surrounded on both sides by various male figures and faces. This photo was taken at approximately 7 PM, so you can see the sun is already starting to set, but this was the best I could do as I am not in this neighborhood very often. Gilbert & George: Waking will be up through October 1st, 2013 in a parking lot adjacent to the The High Line, at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue in Manhattan.