Tag Archive | Pharmaceuticals

Shark Attack Insulin Bottle!

Shark Attack Wheat Paste
Photo By Gail

During a particularly successful Street Art Safari over on 10th Avenue in the Chelsea Gallery District, I spotted this wheat paste of an Insulin Vial with a Shark on it near 22nd Street. This piece is part of a series by a diabetic artist/photographer known as Appleton who aims to increase Diabetes Awareness through his art. See more photos and read his Mission Statement at Appleton Artwork Dot Com!

Beverly Fishman: Dose at CUE Art Foundation

Untitled Anxiety
Untitled (Anxiety), 2017 By Beverly Fishman (All Photos By Gail)

CUE Art Foundation is currently hosting Dose, an exhibition of paintings by Beverly Fishman, curated by Soundsuit artist Nick Cave. The show is comprised of a series of luminescent, geometric forms that resemble the shapes of common pharmaceuticals. Straddling the line between sculpture and post-painterly abstraction, Fishman’s optically intense work functions as an avenue for social critique, probing the pharmaceutical industry’s aesthetic decisions and branding strategies.

Untitled Opioid Addiction
Untitled (Opioid Addiction)

Post Continues, with More Art, After The Jump!

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Edie Nadelhaft, Generation X

Better Living Through Chemistry
Photos By Gail

Do you like art and, also, drugs? I sure do. Generation X by NY-based artist Edie Nadelhaft is comprised of 9 individual, over-sized glass capsule sculptures — each filled with colorful plastic balls and emblazoned with familiar Social Media acronyms and emoticons — which are part of the artist’s Better Living Thru Chemistry series. You can see more of Nadelhaft’s work from that series at This Link!

Photographed at Lyons Wier Gallery, 542 West 24th Street, New York, NY 10011.

Best Friends For Life
Detail from Above Grouping

Mallick Williams & Co Presents Food For Thought By Lindsey de Ovies


Cruel Birthday By Lindsey de Ovies

Artist Lindsey de Ovies worked over the course of eleven years sculpting the works that make up Food For Thought, which opened last night at Mallick Williams & Co Gallery. Both absurdly humorous and subtly disturbing, de Ovies sculptures of anthropomorphic raw chickens, nail-studded Birthday cakes and oversized pharmaceuticals delicately displayed on cake trays represent the artist’s turmoil with regard to various dysfunctional family relationships. The fact that many of the most stressful family gatherings take place around the holiday banquet table is no accident. And being that we’re already less than a week away from the official holiday season kick off here in the states, it’s surely the perfect time to check out this exhibit!


Bon Bons

Food For Thought by Lindsey de Ovies will be on Exhibit Through January 18th 2012, at Mallick Williams & Co. Gallery, Located at 150 11th Avenue (between 21st and 22nd Streets), New York, New York 10011.


This Photo by Geoffrey Dicker (Click on Image to Enlarge for Detail)

Pink Thing of the Day: Darvon

Say goodbye to Darvon, the once-popular painkiller. The FDA is pulling it from the market “because it can cause fatal heart rhythms.” RIP Darvon. You were never quite strong enough to overcome my tolerance, but at least you tried.

L and M Arts Gallery Presents Damien Hirst’s Medicine Cabinets


The Doctor Is In

It is certainly a rare treat for me, and other art lovers like my chief partner in crime, Geoffrey, when a modern artist of the caliber of Damien Hirst opens a new exhibit here in the city. G and I were understandably excited to attend the opening night reception for an exhibit of Hirst’s Medicine Cabinets at the L & M Arts Gallery on the upper East side this past week. I’ve been lucky enough to catch a couple of Hirst’s exhibits previously and they are always extremely emotionally powerful and visually captivating. Hirst is a controversial artist whom many dismiss as being shallow or excessively hedonistic to a degree of pointlessness. Obviously, not everyone “gets it.” Personally, I think his art is beautiful and I enjoy losing myself in the cult of enigma that surrounds his message and motivation. The Medicine Cabinets show at L & M is probably going to leave just as many people puzzled, while those who care not to seek a solution will find them to have a message and meaning that’s open to interpretation and still fully satisfying.


Photos By Geoffrey Dicker

I first saw the Medicine Cabinets series as part of the 2008 exhibit, School: The Archaeology of Lost Desires, Comprehending Infinity, and the Search for Knowledge, where they were contrasted with institutional wall clocks that ran backwards or otherwise told incorrect time, and row upon row of sheep carcasses in formaldehyde tanks. At the L & M show the cabinets stand starkly against the gallery’s white walls, which can’t help but conjure the perception of a clinical setting. As Geoffrey pointed out, everything Hirst puts forth as an artist adds to the conversation, and there is always much to discuss.

Assembled together for the first time are the seminal Sex Pistols cabinets from 1989. Each cabinet takes its name from one of the twelve title tracks of the legendary 1977 debut punk album Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols. Art Critic Arthur Danto writes in the show’s catalog essay that Hirst’s, “Medicine Cabinets constitute a constellation of still lifes that express and reflect the human body as a field of vulnerabilities and of hopeful medical interventions that have replaced the body as a narrative agent that artists must learn to depict in heroic stances.” The exhibition also includes the first two cabinets Hirst ever made: Sinner (1988), in which the artist incorporated drugs from his grandmother’s medicine cabinet and Enemy (1988-89), both of which presage the Sex Pistols cabinets. Also on view is a monumental four-part cabinet The Sex Pistols (1996-97), shown publicly here for the first time.

A separate gallery room on the upper floor  displays a range of Sex Pistols memorabilia including prints, posters, t-shirts and framed, collected 7-inch singles in their original covers (note: I own the “Silly Thing” b/w “Who Killed Bambi?” single that’s exhibited – nice!) all from the seventies and eighties.

Medicine Cabinets by Damien Hirst is on exhibit at the L&M Arts Gallery, Located at 45 East 78th Street, NY New York through December 11, 2010. Gallery hours are 10:00 am – 5:30 pm Tuesday – Saturday or by appointment by calling (212)861-0020.