Tag Archives: Frank Stella

Beverly Fishman: Dose at CUE Art Foundation

Untitled Anxiety
Untitled (Anxiety), 2017 By Beverly Fishman (All Photos By Gail)

CUE Art Foundation is currently hosting Dose, an exhibition of paintings by Beverly Fishman, curated by Soundsuit artist Nick Cave. The show is comprised of a series of luminescent, geometric forms that resemble the shapes of common pharmaceuticals. Straddling the line between sculpture and post-painterly abstraction, Fishman’s optically intense work functions as an avenue for social critique, probing the pharmaceutical industry’s aesthetic decisions and branding strategies.

Untitled Opioid Addiction
Untitled (Opioid Addiction)

Post Continues, with More Art, After The Jump!

Continue reading Beverly Fishman: Dose at CUE Art Foundation

Modern Art Monday Presents: The Shadow By Stephen Greene

The Shadow
Photo By Gail

Stephen Greene (September 19, 1917 – November 18, 1999) was an American artist known for his abstract paintings and, in the 1940s, his social realist figure paintings.  Greene studied with Philip Guston with whom he remained friends until Guston’s death in 1980. During his career, Greene taught at Princeton University, where he was teacher to many well-known figures in the art world including Frank Stella and art critic / historian Michael Fried. In honor of this being Halloween, I wanted to find an appropriately-themed work of art, and I think that Greene’s painting, The Shadow (1950), suits perfectly.

Below is an excerpt from an in-depth interview with Greene conducted by Dorothy Seckler on June 8, 1968, found Here, in which he describes his state of mind at the time of painting The Shadow, and reveals his feelings about the painting:

“In Europe I just sort of went crazy. I didn’t sleep much. I wander around till 5 o’clock in the morning. I had worked very hard to become a painter and to show. I suddenly found myself in a foreign place. And I bought canvas there and it was the wrong canvas and the paint went through. Everything seemed to go wrong. I had sort of loss of nerve. And so when I got a little better, the doctor asked me if I would prefer to go home rather than staying there. Well then I came home. I had taken leave from my job. So I had no job. The Gallery gave me around $150 a month for 2 or 3 months: no, it was a little more than that. But in a very scary way. The Whitney bought The Burial just about that time. And the Gallery was so peculiar about giving me the money sometimes I’d have to call 4 or 5 times for the check. And I needed it. I didn’t live sensibly enough so I could live on $150 a month. So I finally said give me $100 a month. I tried to teach privately. And then I got a one-day job back at Parsons. And I think that psychologically I had undergone a very bad experience. And so suddenly from someone who had been known I became unknown. It was like everything I had sort of worked for for a long time was rather difficult. I was very depressed. And so I had to start off like an invalid almost. I’d put something in front and almost trace it, fill it in. I wasn’t sure whether I’d ever be able to paint. So I painted this picture. It’s called The Shadow.

It’s a setup. But it’s a very simple form easel with an actual skeleton on it, and a bone on the floor and then the shadow of the skeleton on the thing. And in retrospect I certainly am not very happy about it. You know, it’s very morbid and I think subject matter can be murderous because no painting is worth anything unless it’s formally exciting in some kind of very different way. So I think this is just some sort of – you see when anything gets so straightly autobiographical and not much else, no matter what anybody else might see, I just don’t like the picture. That is never with me, too. And I find it’s just a curio out of my existence.”

Photographed in the Whitey Museum of American Art in NYC.

Photos from Frank Stella: a Retrospective at The Whitney Museum

Installation View
All Photos By Gail

Have you been over to the Whitney Museum yet, to see the massive Frank Stella Retrospective? Geoffrey and I went a couple of weeks ago and it was absolutely packed, so maybe you want go sooner rather than later. Because it is super cool and there is so much art to look at that you may want to go twice.

Multicolor Painting

Maybe you don’t know who Frank Stella is, and that’s OK. It is impossible to know every great artist. I’m not going to spend a lot of time giving you background information or discussing why Frank Stella (b. 1936) is one of the most important living American artists, because in this case I think the pictures should do all the talking.

Triangle Painting

And if you are moved by the art, then you should be compelled to seek out more information on the man who created it. The Whitney Museum retrospective is the most comprehensive presentation of Stella’s career to date, showcasing his prolific output from the mid-1950s to the present through approximately 100 works, including paintings, reliefs, maquettes, sculptures and drawings.

Multi Panel Painting

The exhibition features Stella’s best-known works alongside rarely seen examples drawn from collections around the world. It fills the Whitney’s entire fifth floor, an 18,000-square-foot gallery that is the Museum’s largest space for temporary exhibitions.

Large Painting

The works are not in chronological order. They are just placed where Frank Stella felt they would fit best.

Leaning Sculpture

There are a lot of works that look similar to the piece pictured above, and they are sort of painting/sculpture hybrids. I love all of them.

Knitting Needle Sculpture

Here’s another one. It is so fantastic and gorgeous. Kids probably love these.

Leafy Sculpture

Maquettes

The four small pieces above are called Maquettes, which are studies for some of his larger pieces. I love that he used soda cans and other household items to create them. Click on the photo to enlarge for greater detail.

Large Wall Sculpture

3 Large Sculptures

Between 1985 and 1993, Stella produced a number of works that were inspired by Herman Mellville’s Moby Dick. As a sort of homage to that, on the day we visited, the museum sponsored a “marathon reading” of the novel, Moby Dick, which is being conducted by the man standing on the far left in the above photo. The three large works on the wall behind him are from the Moby Dick series.

Red and Yellow Square

This one is a good background for the selfies.

Sculpture Detail

I want you to appreciate how difficult it was to get pictures without people in them, which is my thing.

Sculpture Detail

Here’s a cool detail of the piece in the photo right above it.

Large Wall Sculpture

Red and Tan Sculpture

Cage Sculpture

This one is maybe my favorite.

Cage Sculpture Detail

Don’t you want to see all of this stuff in person? Sure you do.

Star Sculpture

On the fifth floor’s outdoor patio there are two gigantic star sculptures, Black Star (above) and Wooden Star (below). These photos were taken from the exterior staircase on the 6th floor.

Wooden Star Sculpture

Grey Painting

Frank Stella: A Retrospective will be on Exhibit Through February 7th, 2016. Visit Whitney Dot Org for more information including museum hours and address, and special events associated with exhibit!

Exhibit Signage

Frank Stella, Shape As Form at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Flin Flon 1970, Sinjerli III 1967
L: Flin Flon 1970, R: Sinjerli III, 1967 (All Photos By Gail)

You have just one more week to catch Frank Stella: Shape as Form, a solo exhibition of career-spanning works by the artist, on view at Paul Kasmin Gallery‘s Tenth Avenue space.The exhibition articulates Stella’s groundbreaking fusion between painting and sculpture.

The title of the exhibition is taken from Michael Fried’s essay published in ARTFORUM in November of 1966, which recognized the historic step Stella took with his Irregular Polygon paintings and “the very closeness of their relation to advanced sculpture.”

Beginning with the Protractor series of the 1960s through the Bali series of the early 2000s, Stella’s course between two and three dimensions has had a profound impact on generations of artists.

Sinjerli III 1967

The exhibition begins chronologically with Sinjerli III, 1967, a Protractor painting employing the compositional element Fans, which was one of three devices developed at this time (along with Interlaces and Rainbows). Though strictly two-dimensional in structure, Sinjerli can be visually interpreted as being either recessive or protruding, optically challenging the limitations of the flat surface.

Flin Flon 1970

The same is true in Flin Flon, 1970, from the series of the same name, in which Stella uses a layered series of “interlaces” to create architectural reference points and illusionistic depth.  These works are evident of Stella’s systematic approach to creating variations of paintings according to pre-determined criteria, which grew in complexity with every passing series.

Eskimo Curlew
Eskimo Curlew

Stella’s evolution into the third dimension — from the visual realm to the physical — would progress rapidly through the 1970s and 1980s in the form of the series Exotic Birds, represented in the exhibition by Eskimo Curlew, 1977, and the Circuits, seen here in Mosport 4.75X, 1982.

Mosport
Mosport

La Scienza della Fiacca
La Scienza della Fiacca

From 19841987, Stella’s hybridization of painting and sculpture would reach a dramatic crescendo in the Cones and Pillars series. Included in this exhibition is La Scienza della Fiacca 3.5X, 1984, a masterwork that was illustrated in the monograph from the artist’s 1987 mid-career retrospective at The Museum of Modern Art, NY and last exhibited at the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart in 1989.

Stella Wall Sculpture

In the Cones and Pillars, the fundamental physical constructs of what traditionally constituted a painting had been expanded, effectively broadening the definition of the medium.

Frank Stella, Shape As Form will be on Exhibit Through October 10th, 2015 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Located on the Southwest Corner of 27th Street and Tenth Avenue in the Chelse Gallery District.

Canvas

Frank Stella Signage

Metal Wall Sculpture

Frank Stella, Scramble: Ascending Spectrum/Ascending Yellow Values

Frank Stella
Photo By Gail

Yeah, I know it’s freezing ass cold in New York right now and nobody wants to go outside, but if you can force yourself to make it all the way to Tenth Avenue and 27th Street, you can see this gorgeous work of art by Frank Stella, entitled Scramble: Ascending Spectrum/Ascending Yellow Values, (1978) which is part of Paul Kasmin Gallery’s current group exhibit at this location, entitled, The New York School, 1969: Henry Geldzahler at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Kasmin exhibit features many of the original works from the 1971 Met exhibit, New York Painting and Sculpture: 1940 – 1970 including Josef Albers, Alexander Calder, John Chamberlain, Joseph Cornell, Mark di Suvero, Dan Flavin, Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Hans Hoffmann, Donald Judd, Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, Morris Louis, Robert Motherwell, Isamu Noguchi, Kenneth Noland, Claes Oldenberg, Jules Olitski, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Frank Stella and Andy Warhol.

The exhibit will be on display through March 14th, 2015. Surely, it will have warmed up a bit before then.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Frank Stella, Hiraqla Variation III

Hiraqla Variation III
Photo By Gail

Stella’s title, Hiraqla Variation III (1969) refers to Hiraqla, an archeological site in present-day Iraq that contains a half-built circular structure probably constructed around 800 CE. Thus, the circular canvas, brilliant coloring and geometric patterning reference complex domes and intricate tile work of Islamic architecture.

Photographed at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California, while on loan from the Norton Simon Museum.

Must See Art: Frank Stella Sculpture at the Marianne Boesky Gallery

Puffed Star II, 2014
Puffed Star II, 2014, Polished Aluminum (All Photo By Gail)

Can you believe that Frank Stella is 78 years old and he is still making amazing sculptures like Puffed Star II? I can’t even believe it — and yet, it is true. Right now, Marianne Boesky Gallery presents Frank Stella Sculpture, the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery since joining in the spring of 2014, and you really have to check it out. Because, Look at this:

K.150, 2014
K.150, 2014

Just Look at it!

K.150, 2014

K.150, 2014

If this were the only piece in the show, it would still be worth going to. K.150, as it is called, was rendered using rapid prototyping or 3D printing. So remarkable.

More Photos After the Jump!

Continue reading Must See Art: Frank Stella Sculpture at the Marianne Boesky Gallery