Tag Archives: minimalism

Instagram Photo of the Week: Ellsworth Kelly’s Sculpture for a Large Wall

We had a day off work this past Monday for President’s Day, so I took myself to the Museum of Modern Art to check out Guillermo del Toro’s Crafting Pinnocchio exhibit (which is just fantastic) and catch Meret Oppenheim’s My Exhibit before closes on March 4th (also excellent). The museum is also celebrating the centennial of the late Ellsworth Kelly’s career with an installation in the atrium gallery which includes his monumental Sculpture for a Large Wall.
Continue reading Instagram Photo of the Week: Ellsworth Kelly’s Sculpture for a Large Wall

Modern Art Monday Presents: Carmen Herrera, Iberic

carmen herrera iberic photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

With an expressive composition of interwoven shapes in black, red and orange, Carmen Herrera’s  Iberic (1949) oscillates between the geometric and the organic. Herrera painted this work during a formative period in Paris between 1948 and 1954, when she experimented with different modes of abstraction informed by the European avant-gardes, from Suprematism to the BauhausContinue reading Modern Art Monday Presents: Carmen Herrera, Iberic

How To Build A Capsule Wardrobe That Represents Your Style

capsule wardrobe
Photo by Ksenia Chernaya on Pexels.com

As we continue into 2022 with the hope that we will be able to venture out freely, walk into our offices and attend social events, the one thing we need to focus on is our wardrobe. For many of us, the pandemic put an end to our social life and we stopped spending money on our clothes. But now it’s time to simplify our lives and get things in order — this means working on an updated wardrobe. If you are a minimalist and don’t like an overflowing closet, you may want to consider building a capsule wardrobe. Continue reading How To Build A Capsule Wardrobe That Represents Your Style

Modern Art Monday Presents: Sol LeWitt, Five Towers

sol lewitt five towers photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

One of the pioneers of Conceptual art, Sol LeWitt gave primacy to the originating idea of a work of art rather than to its execution. LeWitt had been developing these ideas in three-dimensional objects he called “structures.” Based on the unit of an open, rather than solid, cube, the works peel away what he perceived as the decorative skin on traditional sculpture, revealing their underlying skeleton, or structure.

sol lewitt five towers photo by gail worley

Though he created structures in a range of scales and shapes — the permutations growing more intricate over the decades — LeWitt maintained the use of white cubes with a ratio of 1:8.5; that is, the open space between the edges of a cube is 8.5 times the width of each edge. Five Towers (1986), a later, more complex structure, rises more than seven feet high, culminating in four towers on each corner of a square, with a fifth tower in the center.

sol lewitt five towers photo by gail worley

Photographed in The Whitney Museum in NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Felt By Robert Morris

pink felt by robert morris 2 photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail Worley

Felt works by Robert Morris, including this piece entitled Pink Felt (1970) embody his notion of Anti-Form. Instead of executing a predetermined design, Morris allowed the final outcome of a sculpture to be determined as much by his simple actions (cutting and draping the material) as by gravity and chance.

pink felt by robert morris detail photo by gail worley
Pink Felt, Detail

A departure from earlier, unitary geometric forms of the Minimalist sculptures that the created in the 19603, Morris’s felt works, including Pink Felt, foreground the physical qualities of his materials and the artist’s physical process.

pink felt installation view photo by gail worley
Installation View

“Disengagement with preconceived enduring forms and orders for things is a positive assertion,” the artist writes in his 1968 essay, Anti Form. “It is part of the work’s refusal to continue estheticizing form by dealing with it as a prescribed end.”

Photographed in the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.

pink felt by robert morris photo by gail worley