Tag Archive | Travel

Pink Thing of The Day: The Men of Vacaya

Vacaya Gang By Gail Worley
Photo By Gail

This past January, I made my first trip to the New York Times Travel Show at the Javits Center, because I am always game for new experiences to bring you on this rad blog. The show was amazing, and it inspired me to consider traveling to all sorts of exotic lands that I had previously never even considered visiting. But for reasons that should not need explaining, I had the most fun visiting the L.G.B.T.Q. Travel Pavilion. It was there that I met the men of Vacaya, which is the only large-scale travel company on earth serving the entire LGBTQIAPK community (IAPK = Intersex, Asexual, Polygamous / Polyamorous, Kink). Vacaya was giving away a Gay Cruise, and since I have the single best story ever about a Gay Cruise (which was told to me a decade ago by my friends Ross and Scott), I had to share the story with them. They all agreed that is was excellent.

Also known as The Vacayans, these handsome guys were so friendly and adorable that I was compelled to snap this fantastic photo of them, smiling and looking awesome in their Pink T Shirts, to capture the moment. I joked that I was going to make them my Pink Thing of the Day, but then I thought ‘why the fuck not, just do it!’  If you were gay, wouldn’t you want  them to help you plan your next vacation? I sure would!

I realize that people may not be booking a lot of travel just at the moment, but, for all of my LGBTQ etc readers, when you are ready to venture out into the world again and want to plan your next adventure, please visit MyVacaya.com, and tell them the Worley Gig sent you.

Sigmar Polke, Eine Winterreise at David Zwirner

Palme auf Autostoff (Palm Tree on Fabric)
Palme auf Autostoff (Palm Tree on Fabric) By Sigmar Polke (All Photos By Gail)

David Zwirner is currently hosting Eine Winterreise (A Winter’s Journey) the gallery’s first exhibition dedicated to the work of German artist Sigmar Polke since having announced its representation of the artist’s estate. Curated by Vicente Todolí, the exhibition presents a selection of works by the artist that address an expanded notion of travel.

Lungta
Lungta

Sigmar Polke (1941-2010) is widely recognized for his multidisciplinary output of paintings, photographs, drawings, prints, objects, installations, and films. Characterized by a relentlessly experimental and inquisitive attitude, the artist’s work employs unusual materials and techniques, and playfully defies social, political, and aesthetic conventions. Throughout his prolific career, Polke’s unorthodox approach to materials, subject matter, and artistic processes was always concerned with the testing of limits and boundaries, and this exhibition will demonstrate the breadth and lasting influence of his radical and innovative practice.

Ohne Titel (Untitled)
Ohne Titel (Untitled)

The works in the exhibition will range from playful takes on mass-produced tourist scenery from the 1960s to compositionally layered paintings from the 1980s that offer complex reinterpretations of travel-related themes, Romantic notions of the sublime, and hallucinatory imagery — thereby addressing both outward, physical travel and inner/mental, intellectual journeys. In particular, the exhibition centers on the artist’s around-the-world journey from 1980 to 1981 that took him to Indonesia (Bali, Java, Sumatra), Papua New Guinea, Australia, Tasmania, Malaysia, and Thailand, among other locales.

Hallucinogen
Hallucinogen

As noted by Polke, this trip inspired a close consideration of the material forms and cultural practices of color itself: “how, for example, Hinduism explains and uses color or how Australians use color.”1 The exploration of color as an aesthetic end in itself led Polke to the unconventional use of often dangerous or unstable chemical substances within his work. Describing this process, Polke stated simply: “I was looking for brilliance of color, and it happened to be toxic.”

Magnetische Landschaft
Magnetische Landschaft (Magnetic Lanscape)

The exhibition will include a number of large-scale paintings, including Magnetische Landschaft (Magnetic Landscape), an abstract mountainscape executed in acrylic and iron mica on store-bought, checked fabric from 1982. The materials, content, and support in this work each simultaneously present distinct facets of Polke’s multivalent investigation into German cultural and artistic history: medieval alchemical and (pseudo-)scientific experiments, Romanticism’s fraught invocation of the natural world, and postwar Germany’s bourgeois embrace of consumerism.

Lappländische Reise I (Lapland Journey I)
Lappländische Reise I (Lapland Journey I)

The link between material experimentation and physical exploration is further explored in Polke’s Lappländische Reise (Lapland Journey) series from 1984. As the series progresses, recognizable figures (a reindeer, a row of trees) are eliminated, as semi-transparent washes of lacquer dissolve into shifting, hallucinogenic forms.

Lappländische Reise III (Lapland Journey III)
Lappländische Reise III (Lapland Journey III)

Installation View

Polke’s attention to the properties and effects of transparency can be seen also in the selection of works from his series Laterna Magica. Painted in lacquer on both sides of transparent polyester fabric, they combine figuration and abstraction in complex, layered compositions. These works moreover evoke the medium of the magic lantern, an early slide projection device that predated the invention of the cinema.

Translucent Painting

Also on view will be a selection of experimental film works that document Polke’s own travels.

Sigmar Polke’s Eine Winterreise will be on Exhibit Through June 25th, 2016 at David Zwirner Gallery, Located at 537 West 20th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

I Love Not Camping Cosmetics Bag!

I Love Not Camping Cosmetic Bag

There are many things I love when it comes to vacation time, but mostly, I Love Not Camping! If you, like me, prefer a fancy hotel to sleeping in a tent, combating bugs and not having a bathroom, then  maybe you want to own this cosmetics bag that expresses your feelings? Own it for just $16.95 at This Link!

I Love Not Camping Cosmetic Bag

Baby Jesus Takes Road Trip, Returns Home Safely

Baby Jesus Road Trip Leising
John Leising; his wife, Joan; and their daughter, Julia, return the well-traveled statue of the infant Jesus to its place in the Nativity scene in front of their North Buffalo home.

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From The Buffalo News
Family’s decoration back after 8 months

By DAN HERBECK
News Staff Reporter
12/19/2006

John and Joan Leising were quite upset last year when somebody stole the plastic infant Jesus statue from the lighted manger set outside their North Buffalo home. This year, they have the Jesus statue back – and a pretty weird story to tell at Christmas parties.

“When we tell people about it, they just look at us and say, “Wow, that really happened?’ ” Joan Leising said. “Then, we show them the photo album.”

The Leisings, residents of Depew Avenue, take pride in their annual Christmas decorations. They have displayed a brightly lighted outdoor manger set – with statues of Jesus, Mary, Joseph, the Three Wise Men and other biblical figures – for the past five years. They were hurt Dec. 23, 2005, when they looked outside and realized the baby Jesus statue, a relatively inexpensive plastic model about 18 inches tall, was missing from the manger.

In the statue’s place, someone had left a note, saying they needed the statue for something and would return it in three days. The incident was disturbing to the Leisings and their daughter, Julia, 10, who are proud of their Catholic faith and thought the theft might be some kind of angry show of protest.

“It kind of shook my faith in our neighborhood. How could somebody do something like that to us?” said John Leising, a veteran Buffalo firefighter. “But because of the note, I thought there was a chance we might get it back in a few days.”

Joan Leising, a hospital nurse, felt the same way. But weeks passed, and then months, and the statue was not returned. Joan Leising started wondering if she might be able to find another similar baby Jesus statue at a garage sale.

Then, one morning in late August, John Leising opened his door and found the statue lying on his doorstep. With it were another note and a photo album.

“Please read this letter in its entirety before passing judgment on the actions and events that have taken place,” the letter began. “We are simply a group of young adults who wished to show the baby Jesus a better life than he would have seen cooped up in an attic crawl space. He has traveled over counties and states, met people and animals alike. We have done our best to show the baby Jesus the many glorious aspects of our world.”

The photo album was full of snapshots taken of their Jesus statue at various locations all over New York State. Someone had posed the statue in front of Thruway signs in Binghamton, Rochester, Albany and Poughkeepsie. The statue was photographed at the Rip Van Winkle Bridge south of Albany and at a psychiatric center in Rochester.

Baby Jesus RVW Bridge
Baby Jesus Visits the Rip Van Winkle Bridge

The Leisings’ statue was posed on a bicycle, on a horse and in a car, wearing a seat belt. It was photographed in a chair next to a campfire somewhere, with a can of beer in a cup holder attached to the chair. It was photographed in someone’s kitchen, next to all the makings for chocolate brownies. There was the Jesus statue again – on the campuses of Rochester Institute of Technology and Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

“We have done the best possible job we could to keep the baby Jesus safe and in loving arms,” the note continued. “During the course of the last eight months, the baby Jesus has become more to us than simply a plastic religious figurine. He has come with us to parties, on camping trips, on college visits and on multiple summer adventures . . . Having to say goodbye made today a sad day for all of us.

“The baby Jesus has made us happy at numerous times in the past eight months, so we hope the chronicles of his life with us can pass some of that happiness on to you.”  The note added that the prank was never meant to be “blasphemous or disrespectful.” It was signed “Creators of the baby Jesus chronicles.” The Leisings are still puzzled over why the chroniclers indicated the statue would be returned in three days but kept it for eight months. “I just wish that, at some point during those eight months, they had sent us a note saying, “We still have your statue. It’s OK. We’re still going to return it before Christmas,’ ” Joan Leising said.

“The real Jesus Christ would have forgiven them for that,” John Leising said. “And we do, too.”