Tag Archive | Art

Modern Art Monday Presents: Still Life With Cake By Raphaelle Peale

Still Life with Cake
Photo By Gail

Still Life With Cake (1818), a typical still life by Raphaelle Peale (17741825), the son of Charles Willson Peale, may have been the picture exhibited in 1819 at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts as Still Life—Wine, Cakes, Grapes, &c. A similar picture dating from the same year is in the Detroit Institute of Arts. Peale’s tightly-grouped still lifes are often permeated with a delicate melancholy akin to that which characterized the life of the artist; he was an alcoholic who suffered the effects of arsenic and mercury poisoning caused by his work as a taxidermist in his father’s museum. His spare, essential style may have been influenced by the Spanish still lifes he studied in Mexico and by the works of Juan Sanchez Cotan, exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy in 1818.

Photographed in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Cast Glass Chairs By Marc Newson

Marc Newson Glass Chairs
All Photos By Gail

From the outset of his singular career, designer Marc Newson has pursued parallel activities in limited and mass production of functional design objects. Revisiting his roots as a jeweler and silversmith in an exhibition at Gagosian Gallery in Chelsea, Newson explores increasingly rare decorative techniques at an unconventionally large, even unprecedented, scale.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs

Newson’s Cast Glass Chairs (2017), made in the Czech Republic, are continuous symmetrical forms comprised of two hollow quarter-spheres. The boldly colored upper halves rest on clear bases, which absorb some of the reflected hues in their clouded interiors, an effect that subtly changes depending on the viewer’s vantage point.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs
When You Just Get Tired of Waiting for that Final Person to Move Out Of Your Way

Photographed in the Gagosian Gallery, Located at 522 West 21st Street, Chelsea Gallery District, NYC· The Chairs are on View in the Gallery as Part of a Larger Exhibition of Newson’s Limited-Edition Furniture and Artworks, Through February 20th, 2019.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs

The Red Envelope Show Celebrates The Year Of The Pig!

Ice Cream Cones By Ike Sanchez
Red Envelope Art By Ike Sanchez (All Photos By Gail)

The Red Envelope Show is an amazingly fun annual art exhibit that pays homage to the red celebration envelopes distributed by the Chinese community during the Lunar New Year. The show was curated, as it is each year, by Bert Chau of Brooklyn’s Grumpy Bert gallery. Although getting to the show involved a nearly 90-minute subway adventure to arrive at Flushing Town Hall in Queens, it was totally worth it! This was the show’s fourth year, with the exhibit running from January 5th through January 27th!

Flushing Town Hall
Flushing Town Hall

Red Envelope art submissions by local visual artists were displayed and for sale in Flushing Town Hall’s spacious gallery, with pieces by community and school groups also displayed throughout the building for all visitors to enjoy.  Additionally, 25% of the proceeds from sales of the Red Envelope artworks goes towards support of Flushing Town Hall’s visual arts programming!

Gallery Shot
Partial Installation View

While the artwork theme was not restricted to images of Pigs, I do love pigs, and it is, after all, the Year of The Pig in Chinese Astrology, so I decided to focus on the envelopes depicting pigs. As you will see, the participating artists got very creative! Please enjoy a selection of my photos from the show!

Set By Adrian K
Piglet Kicks The Big Bad Wolf’s Ass, Set By Adrian K

The story of The Three Little Pigs, or just a grouping of Three Pigs was a popular theme among many of the artists, as you may notice.

3 Pigs By Kush Wright (Kid Mind)
Three Little Pigs By Kush Wright (Kid Mind)

Three Pigs School Submission
Three Pigs Student Submission

3 Pigs By Matt Stanton
Three Pigs By Matt Stanton

3 Pigs By Lou Pimentel
Three Pigs By Lou Pimentel

3 Pigs By Aaron Meshon
Three Pigs By Aaron Meshon

Kick or Treat
Pigs In Disguise By Kick or Treat

Boss Hogs By CMYKharma
Three “Boss Hogs” By CMYKharma

Here are a few more Student Submissions, which are all excellent.

Pig School Submission
Ice Skating Pig By Student Abigail Lee

Piglet School Submission
Piglet By Unknown Student  

Olivia The Pig School Submission
Olivia The Pig Piglet By Unknown Student  

Partial Installation Detail

There were well over 500 Red Envelope artwork submissions from artists, and almost that many from student and community members! It was great fun to browse through all of the art, which was obviously created with much love.

Trio By Diana Vuong
Trio By Diana Vuong

It was also fun to see work by many Asian artists.

Duo By Kevin Chan
Duo By Kevin Chan

Duo By Shawn Cheng
Duo By Shawn Cheng

Classy Pigs By Cong Rong Zhou
“Classy Pigs” By Cong Rong Zhou

Pig Flowers By Dingding Hu
Pig Flowers By Dingding Hu

Pigs By Aimee Pong
Pig Duo By Aimee Pong

New Years Pig By Frank Chang
Year of The Pig By Frank Chang
Hat Pig By Derrick H Pork By Carina Yuen
Pig in Hat By Derrick H; Pork Products By Carina Yuen

Jane Wu and Andrew Bell
This Littler Piggy ByJane Wu; Sausage Pig By Andrew Bell

Showering Pig By Cameron Cundiff
Showering Pig By Cameron Cundiff

Trio By Vinnie Neuberg
Trio By Vinnie Neuberg

Flying Pigs By JosL J0sL
Flying Pigs By JosL J0sL

Quartet By Deepti Sunder
A Day in The Life of a Pig By Deepti Sunder

Pigs By Kathy Ferguson
Year of the Pig Series By Kathy Ferguson

Pig By Not Cool Co
Pig By Not Cool Co.

Set By Rodmex5
3-Envelope Set By Rodmex5

Thanks for the great art Red Enevlope Show! Happy Year of the Pig, Everyone!

Thats All Folks
Thats All Folks By Snowfox3

Modern Art Monday Presents: Mao (1972), Andy Warhol

Mao
Photo By Gail

Andy Warhol based his Mao paintings, drawings, lithographs, photocopy prints, and wallpaper on the same image: a painting by Zhang Zhenshi that served as the frontispiece for Quotations from Chairman Mao Tse-Tung (known in the “West as The Little Red Book”) and was then thought to be the most widely reproduced artwork in the world. Warhol chose the image of Mao — then chairman of the Chinese Communist Party — after reading news coverage of President Richard Nixon’s trip to the People’s Republic of China in February of 1972, an unprecedented act of cold war diplomacy that marked the first act by a sitting American president to the nation, which at the tie was considered an enemy of the state.

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again, at the Whitney Museum of American Art Through March 31st, 2019.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Rockwell Kent, Moonlight, Winter

Moonlight Winter
Photo By Gail

Rockwell Kent (18821971) was a self-proclaimed wanderer who felt most at home in the wilderness. His artistic and philosophical devotion to nature lead him to explore far-reaching places that served as inspiration for his rugged landscape paintings, as well as several published travelogues.

Moonlight, Winter (1940) depicts the farm in New York’s Adirondack mountains, where Kent eventually settled in 1927. The scene conjures the artist’s vision of a certain — if somewhat distant — harmony between there vastness of the night sky and the quaint shelter of human life.

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Present: Hilma af Klint, The Dove No. 1 (One of a Series)

Helma af Klimt The Dove No 1
Photo By Gail

Hilma af Klint (1862 – 1944) was a Swedish artist and mystic whose paintings were among the first abstract art. af Klint often incorporated insights gleaned from color theory in her paintings, while endowing colors with unique symbolic significances. In The Dove (1915), a group that depicts the creation of matter from light, she used a combination that reoccurs in much of her work: blue and yellow. In the artist’s symbolic vocabulary, blue represents the female, and yellow stands for the male. Though the gendering of these colors was was specific to af Klint, that belief that these two colors represent an essential dichotomy likely derived from Johannn Wolfgang von Geothe’s Theory of Colors (1810), a book found in af Klint’s library.

In Goethe’s theory, colors are made by the mixture of flight and shadow, with blue emerging from the darkness and yellow from the dulling of light; green was their harmonious union. Geothe further claimed that colors were associated with human qualities, aligning blue with baseness and gloom, and yellow with goodness. Though af Klint frequently began groups with this color pairing, the works regularly give way to a spectrum of color

Photographed in the Guggenheim Museum as Part of the Exhibit, Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future, On View Through April 23rd, 2019.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Bridges By James Doolin

Bridges By James Doolin
Photo By Gail

Euro-American traditions of landscape art tend to work differently from those of Native peoples, often picturing the land from afar as a space to behold. James Doolin (19322002) carefully studied the landscape to create Bridges (1989), spending a week at the off-ramp from the 110 Freeway to Interstate 5 in Los Angeles. Using principles that originated in European painting, Doolin designed an expansive vista in which a vast space is seen from a single vantage point. The small figure in the foreground  — intended as a stand-in for the artist or viewer — also appears in many traditional landscape paintings. By applying these motifs to 20th Century Los Angeles, Doolin refers to the power of historical images in shaping our modern experience of place.

Photographed in the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles.