Tag Archive | Art

Happy Pride Month, NYC!

Have Some Pride By Royce Bannon
Photos By Gail

NYC has really gone all out for Pride Month and it is so great to see everybody getting into the spirit of love and unity.  With so much inspiring signage and art work popping up everywhere you look, it’s challenging to document even a small fraction of it, but I was walking home from brunch this past Saturday and passed by this storefront mural by Royce Bannon (AKA @Roycer_700), which currently resides on Avenue A near East 3rd Street. It appears to have gone up in the past few weeks specifically in honor of Pride Month and will like stay up as long as it can.

Have Some Pride By Royce Bannon

The Rainbow “Monsters” are Bannon’s signature characters, which he incorporates into much of his public artwork.

Royce Bannon Pride Mural

Happy Pride, Everyone!

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Helen Frankenthaler, Orange Mood

Helen Frankenthaler Orange Mood
Photos By Gail

In Orange Mood (1966), Helen Frankenthaler (19282011) thinned acrylic paint to the consistency of watercolor in order to create larger, curving expanses of color through which the weave of the canvas remains visible. Like Jackson Pollack, she placed her canvas directly on the floor and poured paint from above, largely without the aid of a brush. Frankenthaler used color as her painterly language, but she never entirely abandoned representation. Although the references can be subtle, her paintings consistently evoke nature. The undulating forms in Orange Mood relate to a simplified landscape, with zones of color recalling different emotional states. Hue and shape convey place and feeling. “I think of my pictures as explosive landscapes, worlds and distances, held on a flat surface,” Frankenthaler once stated.

Helen Frankenthaler Orange Mood
Installation View

Photographed as Part of The Exhibit Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s, On View Through August 2019 at the Whitney Museum in NYC.

Curtis Kulig Love Mural in Soho

Love Mural
Photos By Gail

Artist Curtis Kulig’s popular Love Me campaign can be found on everything from Tote Bags and Baseball Caps to Jewelry and Nike sneakers. But sometimes you just see it out on the street, where it originated.

This minimalist mural, which just says Love twice in black and again in pink paint, was spotted while I was headed uptown on Sixth Avenue, somewhere between Dominick and Spring Street in SoHo, NYC.

Love Mural

Modern Art Monday Presents: Ad Reinhardt, Number 22

Ad Reinhardt Number 22
Photos By Gail

Ad Reinhardt (19131967)  studied both Eastern and Western art history at the undergraduate and graduate levels. He deepened his understanding of Buddhism and other Eastern philosophies by attending the lectures of Zen teacher Daisetz Suzuki at Columbia University. Number 22 (1949) shows Reinhardt fusing Eastern and Western traditions by using calligraphic brushwork inspired by Chinese and Japanese calligraphy in a gridded composition influenced by those of de Stijl cofounder Piet Mondrian.

Ad Reinhardt Number 22 Detail
Number 22, Detail

In classical East Asian painting, the fragility of paper wet with ink limits the artist’s ability to rework the composition. The sturdier canvas support and slower-drying oil paints used throughout much of the history of Western painting allows artists to highlight various revision and layering techniques. Although he worked in oil on canvas, Reinhardt chose to restrain himself and not rework his painting’s surface, in keeping with Asian calligraphic traditions. The result is a far more controlled manner of gestural painting than those of the Abstract Expressionists.

Photographed in the Guggenheim Museum in NYC.

Video: David Shrigley’s Fluff War!

Fluff War Installation View
Video and All Photos By Gail

I admit that I had not visited the current, midtown location of Anton Kern Gallery since they moved from West 20th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District, which was a few years ago at this point. Because Midtown. But then I heard that one of my very favorite living artists, David Shrigley, had an upcoming exhibit at gallery, so I had to attend. Because David Shrigley is The Shit.

Fluff War, as it is called, is Shrigley’s seventh solo exhibition at Anton Kern, and it is comprised of the titular large-scale kinetic sculpture, plus two neon sculptures, and 100 new drawings. If you follow me on the Instagram (@gailpink61) — which you should —  then you have seen an assortment of Shrigley’s hilarious drawings which I have been posting over the past couple of weeks under the hashtag #dailyshrigley. Since they are already on The ‘Gram, as the kids says, I will not be posting any of the drawings here. This post is just about the Fluff War itself.

David Shrigley Fluff War

The structure of Fluff War is a ten foot by ten foot square enclosure akin to a miniature soccer stadium or a giant air hockey table. Trapped inside are clusters of black wooly fluff being blown about a smooth white floor by gusts of wind coming in through surrounding vents. Below is a video I filmed of the Fluff at War!


Mesmerizing and fun! War is a cheeky misnomer for what the fluff is engaged in. Incapable of exerting its own will, the fluff is at the whim of hidden fans, randomly sequenced by a computer program, blowing at varying intervals and strengths. It remains unclear which fluff is winning or losing, what the objective is, or if there is one at all. Regardless, one can easily become an enraptured observer of this nonsensical activity.

Fluff War Installation View

Fluff War Observed From the Gallery’s Second Floor!

David Shrigley Fluff War

David Shrigley’s Fluff War Runs Through June 15th, 2019 at Anton Kern Gallery, Located at 16 East 55th Street, in NYC.

Fluff War Neon Sign

Modern Art Monday Presents: Portrait of Paul Cadmus By Luigi Lucioni

Portrait of Paul Cadmus
Photo By Gail

Luigi Lucioni and Paul Cadmus probably met as students, and they doubtless shared acquaintances within New York’s circles of gay artists and writers. Lucioni’s likeness of Cadmus (1928) celebrated the shared passion of two young moderns for the ideal forms of Italian Renaissance art, particularly the paintings of Piero della Francesca. Within a modern close-up format, the artist captured a gaze that is at once tentative and mesmerizing.

Photographed in the Brooklyn Museum.

Frieze 2019: A Photo Recap of The Fair’s Best Art!

Yayoi Kusama Narcissus Garden
Yayoi Kusama’s Narcissus Garden Sculpture/Installation Paired With Chris Ofili’s Painting To Take and To Give (All Photo By Gail)

On a very rainy Sunday in NYC, the ideal indoor activity turned out  be a ferry ride over to Randall’s Island for the Frieze Art Fair! Because what’s a little mud on your shoes compared to the joy of browsing for hours through thousands of prohibitively expensive artworks?

Yayoi Kusama Narcissus Garden
It Isn’t an Art Fair Without Yayoi Kusama!

Looking back through the digital archives, it appears that my previously most recent Frieze recap dates all the way back to 2015 — wow — for reasons that take too long to talk about. One thing that is abundantly clear though is that my skills as a photographer have improved greatly in the last four years! Let’s take look around this year’s Frieze Art Fair and check out a selection of my favorite art!

Carlotta

Carlotta (2017) is monumental 3D-effect stiles steel sculpture by Juame Pensa, found at Richard Grey Gallery. That’s an Alex Katz abstract painting at the left.

Colored Mirrored Circles

It didn’t take me long get distract by shiny things, because I neglected to note the artist of this installation of Colored Spherical Shaped Mirrors, which is just fantastic.

Metal Weed

It might look like a weed has sprouted up though a crack in the wall at the booth for the Marlborough Gallery, but that weed is actually a metal sculpture. Clever!

Quartz Eroded Newspaper Machine

Quartz Eroded Newspaper Machine (2019) by Daniel Arsham.

Quartz Eroded Newspaper Machine

Here’s the view of another side: Coffee Cup included! Spotted at Perrotin Gallery.

You Drive Me Crazy.

Two colorful, feathered bears wrestle playfully in this sculpture by Paola Pivi entitled You Drive Me Crazy, also at Perrotin Gallery.

Numbers

You know how it is when you have to wait so long for all of the people to clear out of the shot that your forget to make note of what you were photographing? This is one of those times.

Untitled After John Singleton Copley
Untitled (After John Singleton Copley) By Ewa Juszkiewicz

Mermaid Sculptures By Olivia Erlanger

Mermaid Sculptures by Olivia Erlanger at And Now Gallery sell for $8,000 each!

Back and Forth May Marilyn Lerner
Back and Forth (2016) By Marilyn Lerner at Kate Werble Gallery

Alyson Shotz at Derek Eller Gallery

Alyson Shotz created this iridescent suspended soft sculpture made from interlinked, dichroic-dyed aluminum discs, found at Derek Eller Gallery. Check out two detail views of this work, below.

Alyson Shotz at Derek Eller Gallery

Surface of Discs. Exterior.

Alyson Shotz at Derek Eller Gallery

Surface of Discs, Interior.

Gabriele Beveridge True Bone

Here’s a unique blown-glass work by Gabriele Beveridge called True Bone. It’s so lovely I am compelled to offer a side view from which you can see how the glass ‘weeps’ over the chromed Steele frame, or bone.

Gabriele Beveridge True Bone

Men Who Cannot Cry

Men Who Cannot Cry (2018) Neon Sculpture by Alfredo Jaar.

Mark Thomas Gibson The Snowman

Mark Thomas Gibson, The Snowman (2018) at Fredericks and Freiser.

Seung-Taek Lee
Stainless Steel and Urethane Vinyl Sculptures and Drawings by Seung-Taek Lee at Gallery Hyundai.

Alex Da Corte Orb Weaver Weft
Alex Da Corte, Orb Weaver Weft (2019) at Karma Gallery.

Indigo Illusions
Indigo Illusions (1991) By Betye Saar at Roberts Projects.

Empowered Women
Empowered Women (2019) By Andrea Bowers at Andrew Kreps Gallery

This neon sign switched up its timely message by having the “ed” in “Empowered” flicker off and on. Nice.

Metaphysical Leg Pull By Duggie Fields
Metaphysical Leg Pull (1976) By Duggie Fields, at The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd.

You Should Be Dancing (2018)
You Should Be Dancing (2018) By Jim Lambie

This reflective wall sculpture made from the lenses of sunglasses was also spotted at the both for at The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd.

Mirror Balloons By Jeppe Hein
Mirror Balloons By Jeppe Hein (2019) at 303 Gallery of New York.

Sculptures By Marta Chilindron

Colorful Acrylic Sculptures By Marta Chilindron (Above and Below).

Sculpture By Marta Chilindron

My Life As A Tree
My Life As A Tree By Edouard Duval-Carrie (2019) at Lyle OReitzel Gallery.

Shiatsu
Shiatsu (2019) By Max Hooper Schneider

Now here’s a modern sculpture that has everything! Max Hooper Schneider’s Shiatsu takes a custom acyclic vitrine  — that an observer might easily mistake for an ordinary household aquarium — and creates a surreal habitat filled with hand tools scattered among the lush terrarium plant life and accented with a vintage neon sign! Let’s take a closer look.

Shiatsu Detail

Spectacular! Hooper Schneider’s work is represented by Maureen Paley Gallery of London.

Gate By Tony Cragg

Avid readers of The ‘Gig might recognize this freeform abstract sculpture as the work of sculptor Tony Cragg from This Post, though the one above, entitled Gate (2017) is of a much, much smaller scale!

Sound Suit By Nick Cave

Look Up: It’s one of Nick Cave’s Sound Suits!

Raked Leaves (Apparition)

Raked Leaves (Apparition) (2019) by Patrick Jacobs is a tiny diorama that was embedded into the wall of the booth for Pierogi Gallery of New York.

February (2018) by Devan Shimoyama

Check out this fabulous silk flower and bead-embellished hoodie sculpture, February (2018) by Devan Shimoyama. I would wear it.

Well that about wraps up this year’s Frieze coverage. If you dig the photos in this post please share the love and share the link on your social media! Art!