Tag Archive | Art

Favorite Art From The Affordable Art Fair, Fall 2019!

Money Bag Jane By Sean Keith
Money Bag Jane By Sean Keith at Artspace Warehouse, Los Angeles, $800 (All Photos By Gail)

For many New Yorkers, the fist sign of Fall might be the changing of the leaves, or a noticeable dip in temperatures; but for me, it’s the arrival of the Affordable Art Fair, which is the first big art event of the season. Whether you’re shopping for art, looking for inspiration, or just enjoy the social aspect of the fair, the AAFNYC offers something to satisfy every artistic palette. My tastes tend to run to pop and very contemporary art, so I’m going to show you a lot pieces that fit into those categories. Let’s get to it, shall we?

Any Fan
Art Chameleon in Her Natural Habitat

I love how this lady’s dress matches the colors of the art around her!

Grapefruit Beer

The Affordable Art Fair takes place across five days — Wednesday evening through Sunday afternoon — but you’ll always find me there during opening night’s Private View evening, when most of the press attend, and when there’s an open bar! This season’s bar was co-sponsored by Schoffenhofer Grapefruit Beer, which is my favorite drink in the entire universe. It. Is. So. Delicious.

Viktor Freso Niemand

This portly little guy is called Niemand, and he is the creation of Slovakian artist Viktor Freso. Niemand is a reoccurring character in Freso’s oeuvre, and I recommend you Google him and check out his previous incarnations for a fun time! Price: $8,500.

PF1 By Martin C Herbst

PF1 (Painter’s Fate #1) by Martin C. Herbst is an oil painting on mirrored aluminum. Price: $4,400.

Zapatos Personalizados By Vero Nobile

Zapatos Personalizados by Veronica ‘Vero’ Nobile are custom-painted ceramic shoe sculptures. This one features a fun likeness of Wonder Woman! Found at ArtBA Gallery of NYC and Buenos Aires. Price: $400.

David Bowie Heroes By David Hollier

The late David Bowie continues to be a favorite subject for artistic interpretation. This acrylic on canvas portrait of Bowie by David Hollier features the lyrical text from his song “Heroes.”  Very moving! Found at Mayson Gallery of NYC. Price: $8,000.

The Beatles By Walter Kanabe

This decontextualization of a 1963 press photo of The Beatles, by Walter Knabe, features a sparkling finish of diamond dust. At Evan Lurie Gallery of Carmel, Indiana. Price: $8,700.

Jeff Gillette Disneyland Signs

Do you like Disneyland? I sure do. Artist Jeff Gillette created these post-apocalyptic scenarios featuring foreboding takes on the iconic Disneyland Sign, which I find wildly compelling. Found at Bert Green Fine Art of Chicago. Price: $1,500 each.

The Importance of Being Ernest By Ernesto Romano

I seriously never met a Skull I didn’t like. The Importance of Being Ernest (Crowned) by Ernesto Romano is a digital print on perspex that would go with any decor! At online gallery Degreeart.com. Price: $3,130.

Guggenheim (Pink) By Michael Wallner

Another colorful work from Degree Art is Guggenheim (Pink) by Michael Wallner, which is a print on brushed aluminum, in an edition of 25 pieces. Gorgeous! Price: $1,190.

Dean Zeus Installation View

Assorted Sweet Art / Candy Heart message art by Dean Zeus, over at TAG Fine Arts of London UK, is priced at just $300 per square! Affordable, indeed!

Dean Zeus Sweet Art

Debra Franses-Bean POP Artbag

Debra Franses Bean’s POP Artbag sculptures are cast resin embedded with various colorful toys and other items, creating a one-of-a-kind piece to treasure forever. This ‘bag’ features limited-edition, fashion-themed Coca Cola bottles and cans. Found at TAG Fine Arts, it is a unique piece priced at $10,000.

Debra Franses-Bean POP Artbag
POP Artbag, Detail

Debra Frances Bean Glitterati 3 (Pink Flock)

Bean also created Glitterati 3 (Pink Flock), a collection of fashion handbags comprised of vacuum-formed polyurethane with hand-colored, optical high-definition glitter. Breathtaking. Price: $4,800.

Its a Birkin By Nelson De La Nuez

And while were on the subject of handbags, check out It’s a Birkin! by Nelson De La Nuez, which is obviously very heavily influenced by the art of Roy Lichtenstein. At Bruce Lurie Gallery selling for $6,500.

Interstate Now By Scott Froschauer

Here’s a timely piece, Interstate Now by Scott Froschauer. In an edition of 6 pieces at Artspace Warehouse. Price: $382.

Lip Service By Jeremy Biggers

Lip Service by Jeremy Biggers is an oil painting on a custom-cut, shaped wood panel that stands away from the wall like a sculpture. What a great conversation starter this would be! Found at Decorazon Gallery of London. Price: $6,500.

A Dollar Is What I Need By Nemo Jantzen

Do you love Money? Then you might feel drawn to A Dollar Is What I Need; a fiberglass and epoxy resin sculpture by Nemo Jantzen. Found at Artered Gallery selling for $5,200.

Flashs Car By Teachr

Street Art influences are evident in Flash’s Car by Teachr, which is spray-paint and acrylic on a metal street sign. Found at LA-based Bruce Lurie Gallery for $3,000.

Beatles Sculpture By Todd Gray

Also on display in the booth for Bruce Lurie Gallery were many pop art, ‘stacked block’ sculptures by Todd Gray, who is a hot item right now. The Beatles‘ totem pole-like tower seen above has images and lyrics from the Fab Four’s songbook that any fan will recognize. It’s a very cool and fun piece, for sure.

Shep Sculpture By Todd Gray
Shep

Gray makes smaller, table top pieces as well. The sculptures above and below are priced at $5,000, each. This artist is ‘going places,’ as they say, so his work is a good investment!

Wunda Sculpture By Todd Gray
Wunda By Todd Gray

Refraction By Nat Bowen

I love this one. Refraction by Nat Bowen gets its glossy sheen from Bowen’s use of pigmented resin on acrylic sheet, with gold mirror acrylic edges. At Kahn Gallery for $9,900.

Xavi Carbonell Le Petite Folle

This excited little gal is lots of fun: Le Petite Folle (The Girl) by Xavi Carbonell. Priced at $5,000 from Art Angler, NY.

Gregos Faces

Gregos is a French street artist best known for the plaster casts of his face that he installs on the streets of cities across the globe! He has now moved into the gallery (Xin Art Galerie, in France, to be exact) where his Faces sell for $650, each!

Gregos Faces

That’s how you do it!

Palm Mirage #1

Everyone loves a little touch of neon: Palm Mirage #1 by Tom Adair, tucked away at Axiom Contemporary, and priced at $9,250.

Cup IV By Pablo Dona

Pool Party in a Giant Coffee Cup? Sure, why not! Cup IV by Pablo Dona might be a challenge to photograph, but it’s the kind of artwork that you can examine and enjoy for hours. The golfers on the tiny macarons are a nice touch as well!

Cup IV

I understand why they had to put a piece like this inside a vitrine, but I don’t have to like it.

Cup IV

I love this, but I would not want to have to dust it. Found at Evan Lurie Gallery. Price: $5,500.

Thistle III

Its probably because I take so many photos of wild flowers that I was very attracted to Thistle III by Elena Cohen. Priced at $3,000, at Artmix in Brooklyn.

He Looked Good On Paper Sculpture By Nina Bentley

Nina Bentley uses vintage manual typewriters as the basis for her sculptures, of which she also sells photographic prints in limited series’. This one, found at Elisa Contemporary Art, is entitled He Looked Good On Paper. Price unavailable.

He Looked Good On Paper Sculpture By Nina Bentley

Take a closer look at the keys.

America Lets Play Over The Rainbow

America, Lets Play Over The Rainbow by Valerie Carmet takes the concept of the American Flag and replaces the red and white stripes with shelves holding a rainbow assortment of the tiny heads of famous cartoon characters, as seen atop Pez Candy Dispensers! Novel! This one-of-a-kind piece is $6,950 at Azart Gallery.

America Lets Play Over The Rainbow

And . . .That’s All, Folks! The Affordable Art Fair may be over until next year, but you can still visit the websites of these galleries and purchase many of these pieces online, so start shopping! See you in the Spring!

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Gun Magnet By Randall Harrington

Randall Harrington Gun Magnet Wool Tapestry
Photo By Gail

Randall Harrington’s Gun Magnet is but one example of the sculptor and painter’s statement work. Known for his high-concept fabrications of recomposed weaponry, Toastasaurus herds and eerily human robots, the Los Angeles-based artist found his niche in metal and mixed media after years of assisting big-name installation and performance artists working in film-set design. The Gun Magnet wool tapestry (2019, above) was inspired by the bronze sculpture (2014), seen below.

Gun Magnet Sculpture

Photographed as Part of Beyond The Streets in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Juan Gris, The Checkerboard

Juan Gris The Checkerboard
Photo By Gail

Hailed as “the perfect painter” by avant-garde writer Gertrude Stein, Juan Gris developed his signature approach to Cubism beginning in 1911. Using classic café subject matter — such as the newspaper, seltzer bottle, and glass seen here — Gris made subtle adjustments to the conventions of picture making that render ordinary objects both familiar and newly intriguing. For example, in The Checkerboard (1915) and its  bird’s-eye view of a tabletop, a cunning reorganization of pictorial space places objects that should have volume into a single compressed plane. With a nod to play, Gris shows us a fragmented checkerboard, an emblem of the strategy and gamesmanship at the center of his art.

Photographed in the Art Institute Chicago

Modern Art Monday Presents: Rene Magritte, On The Threshold of Liberty

Rene Magritte On The Threshold of Liberty
Photo By Gail

One of Surrealism’s most important patrons, Edward James, was a willing collaborator whose sense of play initiated commissions for his homes from such artists as Salvador Dali and Leonora Carrington. James was impressed with the work of Rene Magritte, which was displayed in the 1936 International Surrealist Exhibition in London, so he invited the artist to paint three decorative canvases for the ballroom of his London home. Magritte painted On The Threshold of Liberty during his stay there in 1937, as the centerpiece of the three works. Originally set behind two-way mirrors, the works would become visible when James changed the lighting, provoking what he called “a profound sensation.”

Photographed in the Art Institute, Chicago.

Explore The History of Graffiti and Street Art At Beyond The Streets NYC!

Art By CES
Art By CES, AKA Robert Provenzano (All Photos By Gail)

Do you like Street Art? I Sure do. Whether you’re already an avid fan of street art, or are just curious about, and open to, getting schooled on the evolution of this rather phenomenal genre of pop culture, you have through the final weekend in September to immerse yourself in an ambitious, but temporary, street art museum called Beyond the Streets.

Spray Paint Cans in Elevator
Spray Paint Cans Wallpaper Inside The Elevator

Sculpture By TENGAone
Paintings and Sculpture By TENGAone

Beyond The Streets is a celebration of society’s most pervasive mark makers and rule breakers with unprecedented purpose and scale; inside these walls you will find a collection of stories and works by artists past and present who have helped to propel graffiti and street art to extraordinary heights. Works from more than 150 of the world’s leading graffiti and street artists from past and present are represented, alongside cutting-edge contemporary artists and pop culture icons. The exhibit spans two full floors on the footprint of an entire city block, in a newly-constructed high rise office building on the waterfront in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (the views alone are worth the price of admission).

Storefront Mural Photos By Jim Prigoff
Storefront Mural Photos By Jim Prigoff

Installation View
Installation View

View 3
Here’s One Of Those Views I Mentioned

Beyond The Streets explores the collective urgency of using the street as a canvas for expression, and while the subject matter varies and the mediums are many, it is in the public sphere where these messages find a home.

Graffiti Mural
Mural By Tats Cru / The Mural Kings

The story starts more than 50 years ago, in the mid to late 1960s, when the contemporary concept of graffiti took shape in the streets of New York and Philadelphia. Disenfranchised youth, inspired equally from boredom and ego, started scrawling their names and monikers everywhere, spawning copycats and competition.

Subway Car Graffiti Photos By Henry Chalfant
Subway Car Graffiti Photos By Henry Chalfant

These early acts of letter-based marks, created in both marker and spray paint, became monumental when repeated on a global scale.

Death of Graffiti 3 By Lady Pink
Death of Graffiti 3 By Lady Pink

People have long taken to the streets to share a name, phrase, image or cause with the world around them to force a public discourse. Streets act as the symbolically important public stage that is both local and universal, the bedrock for both public protest and anonymous action.

Mural By Lee Quinones
Soul Train Mural By Lee Quinones

The streets also act as a tool for civic engagement and activism, and Beyond The Streets includes figures who have used their art to unite the oppressed around a common cause. As it is so often said, “A picture is worth a thousand words,” and simple gestures in public spaces can quickly galvanize a movement, raising awareness of an issue and resulting in change.

Basquiat and Herring
Keith Haring With His Artwork Plus Decorated Leather Jacket, and Drawings by Jean-Michel Basquiat

For some, the streets were a starting point to evolve their message and style. Pushing their craft in figurative, illustrative, realist or abstract directions, they turned their energy and experience toward more traditional settings. For others, graffiti was never an origin, but an inspiration. Elements of graffiti and street art can be found across music, fashion and contemporary art, all helping this culture to proliferate further.

Beastie Boys Logo By Cey Adams
Beastie Boys Logo By Cey Adams

Beastie Boys Installation

The Beasties Boys have multiple galleries dedicated to their music, memorabilia and hip hop legacy. If you’re a fan, you won’t want to miss it!

Beastie Boys 1984 By Josh Cheuse
Pboto of The Beastie Boys Circa 1984 By Josh Cheuse

Beyond The Streets affirms a truth that cannot be overstated: Graffiti and Street Art would not have become what they have without New York City! Let’s take a look at a selection of the thousands of pieces of art — including sculptures, paintings, posters, flyers, installations, photography, and other ephemera that you’ll see in this fantastic exhibit!

Photos By Maripol
Photos By Maripol

Art By Crash
Art By John “CRASH” Matos

Art By Rammellzee
Art By Rammellzee

Lynzy and Art Fans

Friendly docent Lynzy gently reminds a pair of enthusiastic young ones that there is no touching of the art!

Installation View
Installation View

Art By Daze
Daily Commute (Left) and The Four Seasons (Right) by Chris “DAZE” Ellis

Maya Hayuk Fuck Mural
Fuck Mural By Maya Hayuk

Kenny Scharf Sculpture and Mural
Kenny Scharf’s Totemtiki Kinetic Sculpture and Mural

View 1
Let’s Take a Break to Check Out That View Again!

Hip Hop Flyers By Buddy Esquire
Hip Hop Flyers By Buddy Esquire

Magic Touch By Bert Krak and Alexis Ross

Check out this crazy thing: the Magic Touch Porch Tattoo Parlor installation by Bert Krak and Alexis Ross. So cool!

Tattoos

Magic Touch

Untitled Polaroid By Dash Snow
Untitled Polaroid By Dash Snow

Model Train Freight Car Graffiti
Model Train Examples of Freight Train Car Graffiti

Assorted Posters
Posters Collage Installation By Craig R. Stecyk III

Installation By DABSMYLA
Flower-Themed Art Installation By The Husband and Wife Team Known As DABSMYLA

Art By Andre Saraiva

Art Above and Below By André Saraiva.

Art By Andre Saraiva

Lynzys Manicure By Andre
Also By André: Lynzy’s Manicure!

Art By Cleon Peterson
Art By Cleon Peterson

Art By Craig Costello
Art By Craig Costello

Fan The Flames By Shepard Fairey
Fan The Flames By Shepard Fairey

The politically-themed art of Shepard Fairey gets a huge amount of space in the exhibit (see below). All his stuff is great.

Art By Shepard Fairey

Trash Records Pop Up Record Store
Trash Records Pop Up Record Store, Exterior

Trash Records Pop Up Record Store
Trash Records Pop Up Record Store, Interior

Installation View
Art By Mister Cartoon

Installation View
Installation View

Beyond the Streets is all kinds of crazy fun, and there is so much more on display than what I’ve had room for here. We spent close to three hours exploring the exhibit, just taking our time and looking at everything, but you could easily make a full afternoon of it if you really wanted to read all the stories and take a ton of selfies (there are many excellent selfie opportunities that I didn’t cover here, but trust me that the exhibit is infinitely Instagram-able). I’d suggest allowing a minimum of two and one-half hours inside the exhibit. Plan your visit now!

Beyond the Streets Runs Through September 29th, 2019 and is Located at 25 Kent Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn NY (Take the L Train to the Bedford Stop and Walk about 10 Minutes). Tickets are $25 for Adults and Kids Over 12, $11 for Kids Aged 6 to 11, and Free for Kids Aged 5 and Under. Visit This Link For More Information Such as Hours, Discounts, and to Purchase Tickets! 

Art By Faile

Art Above and Below By Faile (Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller)

Art By Faile

Modern Art Monday Presents: Augustina Woodgate, National Times

Augustina Woodgate National Times
All Photos By Gail

National Times (2016 / 2019) by Augustina Woodgate (b. 1981) is a closed-circuit network of clocks synchronized directly by the power grid. Since the Industrial Revolution, schools, factories, hospitals, and offices have used this kind of network architecture — referred to as a “master/slave” configuration — to keep consistent time.

National Times

A single digital master clock sends power signals to a series of analog slave clocks, commanding synchronized measure across an entire institution. The master keeps steady time based on a pulse    transmitted directly from the local power grid, whose frequency is aligned with the atomic clock at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, which establishes official United States time.

National Times

Here, the hands of the slave clocks have been outfitted with sand paper. As National Times progresses, the minute hands of the slave clock scrape away the numerals on their faces until they are completely erased. Conditioned by the current state of labor and power, the slave clocks progressively erode their functional value, collectively reclaiming autonomy in the process of disintegration.

National Times
National Times, Installation View

Photographed as Part of the 2019 Biennial Exhibit at The Whitney Museum in NYC

Queen Andrea’s Believe Mural On The Houston Bowery Wall

Queen Andrea Believe Mural
All Photos By Gail

Even though it’s been up since June 4th, it was just last week that I finally had the chance to check out the latest amazingly colorful mural on display at the famous Houston Bowery Wall, which is entitled Believe,  and is the work of Andrea von Bujdoss, aka Queen Andrea. Queen Andrea is a New York City-based artist who specializes in fine art, murals, typography, and graphic design.  Believe serves as a celebration of the city’s cultural diversity and “vibrancy of urban life.”

Queen Andrea Believe Mural

For Believe, in which Queen Andrea used paints in super bright colors, the eponymous typography messaging is a focal point, along with the words Love More on the lower right corner at street level. The artist uses these encouraging messages about staying positive and believing in what inspires you the most and makes you love more!

Queen Andrea Believe Mural

Queen Andrea’s focus on typography as an artist is an evolution of her history as a female graffiti artist. She grew up near the Houston Bowery Wall in Soho, where she began painting graffiti and studying graphic design as a young teen. The mural is  part of an ongoing partnership between Goldman Global Arts and Citi.

The Houston Bowery Mural Wall is located at the intersections of East Houston Street and Bowery on the Northwest Corner.

Queen Andrea Believe Mural

Modern Art Monday Presents: Tom Wesselmann, Still Life Number 36

Still Life Number 36
Photo By Gail

The enormous sandwich and pack of cigarettes in Still Life Number 36 (1964) reflect Tom Wesselmann’s nonhierarchical approach to subject matter and technique. He believed that anything could be art, including the ordinary consumer items that fill our pockets and kitchen cabinets. In 1962, Wesselmann began a series of large-scale still lifes that incorporated fragments of discarded commercial billboards, which he initially scavenged from trash cans but later procured in new, pristine condition directly from advertising agencies. The larger-than-life proportions of the objects in Still Life Number 36 at first seem to celebrate the surfeit of commercial goods in America’s postwar consumer culture. Yet the layers of collage and painted areas bring together incongruent depictions of reality, creating tensions in the composition that Wesselmann described as “reverberation.

Photographed in the Whitney Museum in NYC

Simone Leigh’s Brick House On The High Line

Brick House By Simone Leigh
All Photos By Gail

The first time I laid eyes on Simone Leigh’s monumental Brick House sculpture I was on the bus heading uptown on 10th Avenue.

Simone Leigh Brick House from Distance

I looked up and there she was, gazing out over the oncoming traffic from her perch on the 30th Street overpass, which I am told is now known as The Plinth. A month or so passed before I was able to pay her a proper visit and find out what she is all about.

Brick House Taken From Street Level

Brick House By Simone Leigh

Brick House is a 16-foot-tall bronze bust of a Black woman with a torso that combines the forms of a skirt and a clay house. The sculpture’s head is crowned with an afro framed by cornrow braids, each ending in a cowrie shell. Brick House is the inaugural commission for the High Line Plinth, a new landmark destination for major public artworks in New York City.

Brick House By Simone Leigh
View of Brick House Looking East to 30th Street

This is the first monumental sculpture in Leigh’s Anatomy of Architecture series, an ongoing body of work in which the artist combines architectural forms, from regions as varied as West Africa and the Southern United States, with the human body. The sculpture’s title (which is familiar to most as the title to popular 1977-era song by The Commodores) comes from the term for a strong Black woman who stands with the strength, endurance, and integrity of a house made of bricks.

View of 10th Ave Looking South
View From The Plinth Looking South Down 10th Ave

Brick House references numerous architectural styles: Batammaliba architecture from Benin and Togo, the teleuk dwellings of the Mousgoum people of Cameroon and Chad, and the restaurant Mammy’s Cupboard in Natchez, Mississippi. The sculpture contrasts sharply against the landscape it inhabits, where glass-and-steel towers shoot up from among older industrial-era brick buildings, and where architectural and human scales are in constant negotiation. Resolutely facing down 10th Avenue, Leigh’s powerful Black female figure challenges us to consider the architecture around us, and how it reflects customs, values, priorities, and society as a whole.

Brick House By Simone Leigh

Leigh works across sculpture, video, installation, and social practice, stitching together references from different historical periods and distant geographical locations. As a sculptor, Leigh works predominantly in ceramics—a medium that she mastered early in her career—continually pushing the boundaries of her chosen material by working in new methods and larger scales. In her intersectional practice, Leigh focuses on how the body, society, and architecture inform and reveal one another. She examines the construction of Black female subjectivity, both through specific historical figures such as Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham, and more generally through overlapping historical lineages across Europe, Africa, the US, and the Caribbean.

The High Line Plinth presents a series of art installations that rotate every eighteen months. Designed as the focal point of the Spur, the newest section of the park that opened in spring 2019, the Plinth is the first space on the High Line dedicated solely to new commissions of contemporary art.

Simone Leigh’s Brick House will be on View on The High Line Plinth (at the Spur), 30th St. and 10th Ave., NYC, Through September 2020.

Simoe Leigh Brick House from Distance

Modern Art Monday Presents: Edward Hopper, Seven A.M.

Edward Hopper Seven A.M.
Photo By Gail

Edward Hopper’s Seven A.M. (1948) depicts an anonymous storefront cast in the oblique, eerie shadows and cool light of early morning. The store’s shelves stand empty, and the few odd products displayed in the window provide no evidence of the store’s function. A clock on the wall confirms the time given in the title, and indeed the painting seems to depict a specific moment and place. Yet a series of Hopper’s preparatory sketches reveal that he experimented with significant compositional variations, depicting a figure in the second story window. He even considered setting the painting at another time of day. His wife, Josephine Hopper, a respected artist herself, described the store as a “blind pig” — a front for some illicit operation, perhaps alluding to the painting’s forbidding overtones.

Hopper 7 AM Study
Study for 7 A.M.

Photographed in the Whitney Museum in Manhattan.

Edward Hopper Seven A.M.