Tag Archives: 1968

Modern Art Monday Presents: Alma W. Thomas, Wind Sunshine and Flowers

wind sunshine and flowers photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Alma W. Thomas derived her vibrant color palette and lyrical brush work from the shapes and movement of foliage, flowers, and other natural forms. The stripes of bright pigment in Wind, Sunshine and Flowers (1968) create an engrossing effect that recalls feelings of awe inspired by nature

For Thomas, the visual realm of natural phenomena offered a way to transcend the racial biases she experienced as a black painter and educator in the early to mid -20th century. In 1972 she wrote, “man’s highest aspirations come from nature. A world without color would seem dead. Color is life. Light is the mother of color. Light reveals to us the spirit and the living soul of the world through colors.”

Photographed in The Brooklyn Museum.

 

Modern Art Monday Presents: Sam Gilliam, Carousel State

carousel state photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

Liberated from its stretcher, Carousel State (1968) explores the material and chromatic possibilities of canvas, a traditional painting support. Gilliam developed his unique approach in the 1960s while working with the Washington Color School, whose compositions emphasized the flatness of the picture plane. This is an early example of the artist’s signature ‘Drape Paintings,” made through a novel process of dripping, smearing, staining, and splashing paint onto raw canvas.

Colors often spread and merged as Gilliam pressed and folded the fabric. He has described this as a kind of equilibrium: “This liquidity of the colors is reinforced by the fluidity of the canvas.” The final step in the creation of Carousel State is its installation, suspended and extending into space.

carousel state detail photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Sam Maloof, Cradle Cabinet

sam maloof cradle cabinet photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

“When you’re working, there’s a communion between the object-maker and the material, [and] it transcends into something much greater,” said  furniture designer and woodworker Sam Maloof.  “When you make something and someone likes it, enjoys it and all, you’re paid tenfold.”

sam maloof cradle cabinet photo by gail worley
Cradle Cabinet, Detail

Maloof was one of the United States’ preeminent woodworkers during the second half of the twentieth century. In 1966, Paul J. Smith, Director of the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), invited Maloof to show his Cradle Cabinet in a thematic exhibition, The Bed. A masterpiece of woodworking skill and sensitivity, the cabinet is also innovative in its design, combining all of the functional needs of a newborn’s nursery into a single piece of furniture.

sam maloof cradle cabinet photo by gail worley
Installation View

Photographed in The Museum of Arts and Design in NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Space Race Paper Dress By Harry Gordon

harry gordon pink poster dress photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

It may be difficult to discern in the dim museum lighting, but the front of this bright Pink Dress features the scene of a rocket launch, and was created in 1968 by American graphic artist Harry Gordon at the height of the international space race.

Continue reading Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Space Race Paper Dress By Harry Gordon

Eye On Design: Red Plastic Bandeau Top and Skirt By Pierre Cardin

pierre cardin red bandeau top and skirt photo by gail worley
Fashion In The Space Age (All Photos By Gail)

Over the course of a seven-decade career in design, Pierre Cardin has released collections that have rocketed so far into the future they were once emblematic of the Space Age.  For an example of Cardin’s influence in popular culture, look no further than  the 1960s cartoon The Jetsons, where Jane Jetson’s styles look as though they could have been lifted from the designer’s showroom.

pierre cardin red bandeau top and skirt photo by gail worley
Installation View Alongside the Porthole Dress (1968), Made from Wool Crepe and Silver Leather

But perhaps it is the Jetson’s teenage daughter Judy who would have been more inclined to fancy this vibrant and fun two-piece red suit consisting of a Bandeau Top and Miniskirt made of vinyl and plastic. The top’s circular breast rings remind me very fondly of costumes worn by Jane Fonda in the 1968 film Barbarella.

pierre cardin red bandeau top and skirt photo by gail worley
pierre cardin red bandeau top and skirt photo by gail worley
Mannequin Also Wears the Wool Envelope Hat  (1979)

This Out-Of-This World Design was Photographed in the Brooklyn Museum as Part of the 2019 – 2020 Exhibit, Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion.