Tag Archive | Op Art

Julian Stanczak, The Life of The Surface, Paintings 1970 – 1975 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash

Filtration- Opposing to Red
Filtration – Opposing to Red (All Photos By Gail)

We were very sad to learn of the passing of groundbreaking painter and Op Art pioneer, Julian Stanczak on March 25th of this year. He had good, long life! As a last hurrah, Mitchell-Innes & Nash is currently hosting The Life of the Surface, Paintings, 1970 – 1975, an exhibition of Stanczak’s paintings exclusively from the years 1970 to 1975. This long-planned exhibition is Mitchell-Innes & Nash’s second solo exhibition with the artist, and the first since his recent passing.

Red + Red
Red + Red

Red + Red Detail
Red + Red, Detail

Stanczak’s reverence for color comes from a desire to translate the drama and power of nature into a universal impression. His canvases are created through a complex process of tape masks upon which colors are systematically added and unveiled in layers. Despite the intricate and painstaking process, Stanczak does not use any preparatory drawings for his paintings, relying solely on his own vision of a finished work.

Installation View
Installation View

Column Painting
Detail
Detail from Above Painting

The artist’s work transcends traditional nods to analytical painting methods often associated with this period by drawing upon personal experiences, particularly the diverse places he has lived. Utilizing tromp l’oeil characteristics, Stanczak’s paintings engender the vibration of a distinct visual experience from within the surface of the canvas.

 Yellow and Orange Triangles

Red to Black

In works like Filtration- Opposing to Red (1974-77) the color radiates from the center, vibrating across the surface of the canvas. The light oscillates and encompasses the viewer, creating an engaging and thoughtful experience with color. While the intensity is similar, the cool tones of Soft Light (1972-73) resonate at a gradual pace and generate a calmer energy. The artist described his titles as “provocative of the experience that parallels [his] initial response,” rather than direct descriptions.

Diatonic
Diatonic

Diatonic Detail
Diatonic, Detail

Julian Stanczak’s body of work is awe-inspiring and unique. Whether you’re already a fan, or if you’ve never seen his work in person, now is the time to check him out.

Lime Green

Left Status Blue Right Five Verticals

Julian Stanczak’s  The Life of The Surface, Paintings 1970 – 1975 will be on Exhibit Through June 24th, 2017 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Located at 534 West 26th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Pink and Aqua

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Eye On Design: Cabinet Inspired By The Art of Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley Cabinet
Photo By Gail

I had the most amazing time at the Architectural Digest Design Show a few weeks back, and photographed so many great pieces that will eventually end up in this blog. Here’s one of them: a liquor cabinet designed by Zelouf + Bell that was inspired by the fabulous Op Art of painter Bridget Riley — and you know how much we love her here at The Gig.

Bridget Riley Cabinet

Here’s the reveal…wait for it…

Bridget Riley Cabinet

OMG, so cool! Zelouf + Bells specializes in bespoke art furniture. Visit them online at Zelouf and Bell Dot Com.

Bridget Riley at David Zwirner Gallery

Bridget Riley Black and White Square
All Photos By Gail

Do you enjoy the fabulous Op Art images of legendary British painter Bridget Riley? I sure do. Bridget Riley is so cool, the retro-pop project Death By Chocolate even wrote a song about her. Fabulous. Bridget is 84 now, but still rocking a paintbrush, and I got to meet her recently at the opening reception for her current exhibit over at David Zwirner. You need to check it out.

Bridget Riley Installation View

This new show is the gallery’s first exhibition with Bridget Riley in New York, her first show in the city since 2007, and the only New York presentation since Bridget Riley: Reconnaissance at the Dia Center for the Arts in 2000 to feature new and older works. The exhibition marks fifty years since Riley’s participation in The Responsive Eye at The Museum of Modern Art, the highly influential group show which led to instant, international recognition for the young British painter. Last year, David Zwirner hosted her inaugural show at the London gallery, which was a major survey of her stripe paintings from 1961 to 2014.

Bridget Riley

One of the most significant living artists, Riley’s work has radically explored the active role of perception in art, using the interrelationship between line and color to convey movement and light within the pictorial field. From the early 1960s, the artist has employed elementary shapes — such as circles, stripes, and curves — to create visual experiences that actively engage the viewer, testing the limits of each element at various stages throughout her career.

Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley Vertical Stripes

Stripes

This exhibition includes paintings and works on paper spanning almost thirty-five years of Riley’s practice. It takes its chronological point of departure in vertical stripe works from the early 1980s featuring her “Egyptian palette” inspired by the artist’s trip to Egypt in late 1979, which unlike previous combinations of color was organized according to plastic (and not rational) principles. These asymmetrical compositions anticipated the ensuing diagonal grid paintings that Riley began in 1986. Featuring rhomboid shapes that break up the picture plane, these in turn became the foundation for her curved paintings in the late 1990s.

Bridget Riley Installation View 2

Vertical, curvilinear shapes prevailed in the past decade and also characterize her wall painting Rajasthan (2012), a composition of intersecting forms in green, gray, orange, and red whose presentation here marks its first display outside of Europe.

Bridget Riley Orange and Green

Bridget Riley Orange Purple and Green

Bridget Riley Yellow Blue and Green

Bridget Riley Black and White Long

The exhibition culminates with Riley’s most recent stripe works as well as a new series of black-and-white paintings that explore concavity and convexity of the line, all shown here for the first time. The return to painting in black and white, which she had abandoned in the mid-1960s in order to explore the properties of color, was directly inspired by Riley’s 1962 painting Tremor, and here appears in the current context of five decades of work.

Signature

Bridget Riley will be on Exhibit Through December 19th, 2015 at David Zwirner Gallery, Located at 525 and 533 West 19th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Bridget Riley Signage

Bridget Riley Framed

Modern Art Monday Presents: Victor Vasarely, Ondho

Victor Vasarely, Ondho
Photo By Gail

Victor Vasarely (April 9th, 1906 – March 15th, 1997), was a Hungarian–French artist, who is widely accepted as a leader of the Op Art movement. During the 1960s and ’70s, his optical images became part of the popular culture, having a deep impact on architecture, computer science, fashion, and the way we now look at things in general. Even though he achieved great fame, he insisted on making his art accessible to everyone. His motto was “Art for all”.

The breakthrough brought by his kinetic visual experiments transformed the flat surface into a world of unending possibilities, book marking an era in the history of art and foreshadowing a new global reality shaped by programming and the Internet. Ondho (oil on canvas, 1956 – 60) was painted during a span of time when he worked on serveral different series including Folklore Planétaire, Permutations and Serial Art.

You can learn more about the fascinating life and groundbreaking career of Victor Vasarely by visiting his official website, Vasarely Dot Com, and be sure to watch the very trippy intro!

Victor Vasarely’s Ondho is part of the Permanent Collection at the Museum of Modern Art in Midtown Manhattan.

Must See Art: Julian Stanczak’s From Life at Mitchell-Innes & Nash

Julian Stanczak Four Panels
All Photos By Gail

I don’t think I could count the number of times I overheard someone mention how much the paintings of Julian Stanczak reminded them of Op Art pioneer Bridget Riley while we cruised around the opening reception for From Life, Stanczak’s new exhibit over at Mitchell-Innes & Nash. Trust me: it was a lot – and I was thinking the same thing.

Julian Stanczak Red Bars

But a little research on my part revealed that the term Op Art actually first appeared in print in Time Magazine in October 1964 in response to Stanczak’s Optical Paintings exhibit at the Martha Jackson gallery. Crazy!

Julian Stanczak Orange and Yellow

Now at age 86, Julian Stanczak – a former student of Joseph Albers, whose early life was marked by enormous personal struggle – serves as a true artistic and personal inspiration with his first solo exhibition at M-I & N, which includes a dozen large-scale paintings spanning the artist’s career from the 1960s to the present and includes works not seen publically in decades.

Julian Stanczak Blue and Red Squares

Stanczak’s canvases are created through a complex process of tape masks in which colors are systematically added and unveiled in layers. While incredibly methodical, Stanczak works alone on his canvases without the aid of preliminary sketches, relying solely on his own vision of a finished work.

Julian Stanczak Black Grid

A Detail from the Above Painting is Below.

Julian Stanczak Detail

This is even more impressive when you know that Stanczak lost the complete use his of right arm after confinement in a Siberian hard labor camp during World War II.

Additional 1980
Additional (1980)

Arist in front of Additional
Julian Stanczak, Photographed in front of Additional, at the Show’s Opening Reception on October 30th.

The artist makes the surface plane of the painting vibrate through his use of lines and contrasting colors, but what I want to really emphasize is how these paintings look completely different to the naked eye than they do when seen through the lens of a camera. The observable transformation is really quite remarkable.

Julian Stanczak Black Test Pattern

In fact, it would not be an exaggeration to say that these paintings are mind-blowing.

Julian Stanczak

Very highly recommended!

Julian Stanczak’s From Life will be on Exhibit Through December 6th, 2014 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Located at 534 West 26th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Quatorial 1978
Quatorial 1978

From Life Signage

Modern Art Monday Presents: Bridget Riley Blaze I

Bridget Riley Blaze 1
Bridget Riley, Blaze 1, 1962 (Photo By Gail)

While at Goldsmith’s College in London, Bridget Riley (born 1931) became interested in the optical vibrations initiated by Georges Seurat’s Pointillist technique of the 1880s. By 1961, Riley was painting solely in Black and White, and her paintings of the early 1960s are pioneering examples of what came to be known as Op Art.

With Blaze 1 (1962), Riley applied black zigzag stripes of emulsion to a white ground to create a pattern that assaults the eye: the bands of paint create a corkscrew–like optical effect wherein the two-dimensional painting appears to both recede into the wall and to project itself into space in front of the picture plane.

Bridget Riley’s Blaze 1 is part of the permanent collection in the Modern Art wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Mixed Mediums at Dorian Grey Gallery

X Marks The Spot By BTA
X Marks The Spot By BTA (All Photos By Gail)

The latest group show at Dorian Grey Gallery in the East village, entitled Mixed Mediums, is a true mixed bag of styles. The collected works of more than a dozen artists still manages to achieve a cohesive feel, however, owing to the crossover appeal of various styles of contemporary/pop art.

Cope 2 Skate Decks
Cope 2 Skate Decks

The NYC Street Art movement that the gallery seems to most closely align itself with is represented with works by artists like Cope 2 and BTA.

Perhaps most surprising piece in the collection is a single work by Israeli Kinetic Scultor/Op Artist, Yaacov Agam, seen in a series of sequential shots below:
Yaacov Agam Star of David 3
Photographed from the Right

Yaacov Agam Star of David 1
Photographed from Near Center

Yaacov Agam Star of David 2
Photographed from the Left

The Star of David is an excellent example of Agam’s work, which takes on the appearance of many different pictures and abstract designs, depending on the angle from which it is viewed. I have one of his pieces in my home and I just love it. This one is on sale for $4,500, which is a decent price.

Robert Kantor Double Neck Guitar
Robert Kantor’s Swarovski Crystal Embellished Double Neck Gretsch Guitar

Sculptor Robert Kantor presents three of his Swarovski Crystal-embellished guitars and half a dozen additional works that combine guitar parts with colorful crystal bling. Very Nice!

Robert Kantor A Rose By Any Other
Robert Kantor’s A Rose By Any Other

P1010083

P1010084

P1010085

The Retro/Gothic collage/sculptures of Robbi Wesson (above three photos) would fit right in at an exhibit at Last Rites Gallery. Wesson uses hardware, architectural embellishments, bone, feathers and polished stones, among other found items, to create one-of-a-kind works of art that suggest an enigmatic back story. Highly collectible!

Spence X The Myth Series
Spence X’s The Myth Series

I admit I was a bit perplexed by Spence X’s Myth Series, which is a collection of the artist’s tin foil sculptures of various mythical creatures. These are fun and whimsical and even a bit hilarious, but they looked rather juvenile in the context of the show and, to be brutally honest, most reminded me of the tin foil animal sculptures that servers would create as containers for leftover food at a favorite family restaurant I frequented when I was living in California. So, there’s that.

Spence X The Myth Series

Overall, Mixed Mediums is a fun and eclectic show that’s worth checking out if you are a fan of any of these artists or just happen to be in the neighborhood.

Diorama By Lisa Pan
Art By Lisa Pan

Mixed Mediums will be on exhibit at Dorian Grey Gallery, Located at 437 East 9th Street (Between Ave A and 1st Ave) until September 27th, 2013.

Aakash Nihalani's Portal at Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Aakash Nihalani Signage
All Photos By Gail

I’ve written about street-turned-fine artist Aakash Nihalani previously on The Gig, when one of his geometric neon sculptures was a featured Pink Thing of The Day.

Aakash Nihalani Black Sculpture

Aakash currently has an exhibit at Jonathan LeVine Gallery called Portal, which showcases over two dozen of his bright fluorescent, geometric paintings and sculptures. This exhibit is a must see!

Aakash Nihalani Multiple Fluorescent Wall Pieces

What I love about this show is that the work has a wide range of appeal, to art lovers and also people who don’t have much experience with art, because the shapes, which vary subtly from piece to piece, are so enchanting and the colors so bold.

Aakash Nihalani Pink Square

Aakash is also a really nice and down to earth guy. We met him at the opening reception this past Saturday and he was happy to pose for photos and sign cards – very cool. I will be looking forward to seeing his work in future shows, and on the streets.

100_2006

Portal By Aakash Nihalani will be on Exhibit through February 9th, 2013 at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street, 9th Floor, NYC. Aakash Nihalani Black Spheres