Tag Archive | Window

Eye On Design: Wrought Iron Dragon Door Sculpture

dragon door photo by gail
All Photos By Gail

In NYC, you will come across amazing discoveries every few feet if you just keep your eyes open. I was walking to the train from a fun visit to the newly-reopened Metropolitan Museum of Art when this unique, wrought iron sculptural door caught my eye. And how could it not: It looks like a medieval Dragon is struggling to burst forth from behind a cage onto the sidewalk! Very Scary!

dragon head photo by gail

While I did not want to trespass onto private property, I did sneak a bit closer so that  I could get a good detail shot of the Dragon’s head. It is super cool! I have no clue who the artist is but what an awesome thing to have designed to make this building stand out. I wonder if Game of Thrones fans live there?

spider web window guard photo by gail

They’ve also kept the design cohesive by adding these spider-web-like guards to the first floor windows. This place is officially ready for Halloween all year long. Well done!

These Architectural Features are Part of a Five-Story, Three-Unit Building (According to Street Easy, Although I Suspect it’s a Private Home) Located at 52 East 81st Street between Madison and Park, on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

dragon door sculpture photo by gail worley

Anatomically Correct Male Mannequins in Park Ave South Store Front

Male Manequinns Store Front
All Photos By Gail

A group of nine naked male mannequins has appeared in an empty Gramercy Park storefront. I noticed them for the first time a couple of weeks ago, when I was on my way to a dentist appointment in the area and happened to exit the 6 Train on East 22nd Street — directly adjacent to the storefront.

Anatomically Correct Male Mannequins

I didn’t have my camera with me at that time, but I had it when I was in the neighborhood today!

Anatomically Correct Male Mannequins 2

The statues, by New York City-based artist Richard Dupont, are somewhat larger than life-size and portray the male form in anatomically accurate proportions. Originally on display in Midtown’s Lever House, their current home is within a block of a preschool and a secondary school. I am almost surprised that they were still there, to be honest; considering how prudish people can be when they are exposed to a peen.

Anatomically Correct Male Mannequins 3

The art installation, visible through the newly installed plate-glass windows on the ground-floor of the former Church Missions House, will be on display throughout the summer. Built in 1892, the seven-story Gothic structure was bought by Aby Rosen’s RFR Realty last year for $50 million with plans to convert to a single-tenant office building with ground-floor retail space.

Tiffany Stained Glass Window: Autumn Landscape

Tiffany Stained Glass Window
Autumn Landscape, 1923-24, Leaded Favrile Glass (Photo By Gail)

A tour de force of its medium, this window, executed late in Tiffany’s career, portrays the late afternoon sun filtered through a rich autumnal foliage. It was probably designed by Agnes Northrop (1857 – 1953), who was known especially for her landscapes and flowers.

No paint was used to add detail; rather, the modeling, texture and form were created solely with glass, using the full range developed at Tiffany Studios. The variegated surface was made by wrinkling glass it its molten state. Different color effects were achieved by embedding tiny, confetti-like flakes of glass in the surface. Plating – the superimposition of several layers of glass on the back of the window – added depth.

Although commissioned in 1923 by Loren D. Towle for the stair landing of his enormous neo-Gothic mansion in Boston, the window was never installed. In 1925, Robert W. de Forest, Tiffany’s close friend, donated the window to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where he was president and founder of the American Wing.

autumn landscape louis c tiffany photo by gail worley
New iPhone Photo Added 9/20/20

Modern Art Monday Presents: Marcel Duchamp’s Fresh Widow

Marcel Duchamp Fresh Widow
Photo By Gail

I first became acquainted with Marcel Duchamp’s very famous sculpture, Fresh Widow (1920), when I was studying art in college. Constructed by a carpenter in accordance with Duchamp’s instructions, Fresh Widow is a small version of the double doors commonly called a French window. Duchamp was fascinated by themes of sight and perception; here, the expectation of a view through windowpanes is thwarted by opaque black leather, which Duchamp insisted “be shined everyday like shoes.”

Fresh Widow is also reference to the recent abundance of widows of World War I fighters.

An inscription at the sculpture’s base reads COPYRIGHT ROSE SELAVY 1920, making it the first work to be signed by Duchamp’s female alter ego Rose Sélavy (later spelled Rrose). Duchamp derived the name from the French saying: “éros, c’est la vie,” which can be interpreted as “the sex drive is life.”

Fresh Widow is part of the permanent collection at NYC’s Museum of Modern Art.

Fresh Widow

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