Tag Archive | Museum of Modern Art

Yes, It Exists: Place Setting Place Mats By Stephen Shore

Place Mats by Steven Shore
All Photos By Gail

The International Center of Photography in New York sold these Bob’s Your Uncle disposable placemats, featuring photographer Stephen Shore’s images of food and plates, in 2007, when the institution hosted a survey of Shore’s work that had toured throughout Europe and the US.

Photographed as Part of the Stephen Shore Career Retrospective, on Exhibit Through May 28th, 2018 at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Place Mats by Steven Shore

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Eye On Design: Jumpsuit Prototype By Richard Malone

Jumpsuit By Richard Malone
Photos By Gail

This Jumpsuit Prototype (2017) is born from a confluence of designer Richard Malone’s personal experiences of the garment type, and his deep understanding of its mutations and iterations across history, particularly in the last century. Malone grew up in rural Ireland and identifies strongly with his working-class roots, which encompassed, among other things, functional clothing for construction sites. He looked into the 1920s to engage the bold color and egalitarian attitudes of the Russian Constructivists, who wanted to collapse art into life and eradicate class divides; the jumpsuit appeared in their theatrical experiments.

Jumpsuit By Richard Malone

Malone was also inspired by jumpsuits shaped from a single piece of cloth, a frugal and considered method close to his own practice. He steamed, split, and sculpted a recycled stretch of acrylic he developed, creation dramatic optical effects. The top of the jumpsuit offers many openings, allowing for multi-wear options that are both practical and expressive. The result is a one-size-fits-all, unisex ensemble that manages to capture the glamour and the grit on the jumpsuit’s multifarious history.

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Items: Is Fashion Modern, on View Through January 28th, 2018 at The Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Manierre Dawson, Meeting (The Three Graces)

Meeting (The Three Graces)
Photo By Gail

In 1910, Manierre Dawson (1887-1969) spent six months traveling throughout England, France, Germany, Switzerland and Italy, where he visited museums, collectors and archeological sites. Following this sojourn, he created a series of works in 1911 – 12 based on images from classical art and Old Master paintings. With Meeting (The Three Graces), (1912) he reinterprets the mythological subject of the Three Graces by painting in a manner from both Cubism and Italian Futurism. Although Dawson did not receive much recognition during his lifetime, his avante-garde work was at the forefront of American art at the time.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Toothbrushes

Pink Toothbrushes with Display
Photo By Gail

These Pink Toothbrushes with Pink Bristles are sold in the MoMA Design Store (at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC) for $5.00. The toothbrush was designed by award-winning Danish designer, Andreas Engesvik, who is probably best-known for his furniture designs. You can find them in the point-of-purchase area by the registers, displayed alongside colorful earplugs, capsule-shaped pill cases and snow globe key fobs! Art!

Pink Toothbrushes Alone

David Bowie and Prince Wooden Dolls

Bowie and Price Wooden Dolls
Photos By Gail

Here’s another awesome Holiday Gift Idea for the art lover on your list who also happens to be a fan of David Bowie or Prince. Pay homage to Ziggy Stardust, David Bowie’s iconic persona from the early 1970s, or the late great Prince, with this modern take on Japanese Kokeshi dolls, which are customarily given as symbols of friendship. Each doll measures, 5.7 inches tall, is hand painted in vibrant colors, and is made of schima superba wood. Imagine the adventure these two could have together.

These cool little Dolls, which sell for $42 each, are available directly from the MoMA Design Store at the Museum of Modern Art, or online at This link!

Bowie and Price Wooden Dolls

Modern Art Monday Presents: Painterly Architectonic By Lyubov Popova

Painterly Architectonic
Photo By Gail

In 1919, Lyubov Popova (1889- 1924) described painting as “Construction,”  the building blocks of which were color and line. In this work, Painterly Architectonic (1917), brightly colored, irregularly shaped planes are layered are layered against a neutral background. The curved bottom edge of a grey shape emerging from beneath a red triangle and a white trapezoid suggests three-dimensionality, while the vibrant colors and jutting edges  that seem to extend beyond the frame evoke energetic movement. Painterly Architectonic is one of a series of works that Popova created between 1915 and 1919 is response to Kazimir Malevich’s Suprematist paintings.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Yes, It Exists: Mickey Mouse Head Camera

Mickey Mouse Camera
Photos By Gail

In 1971, Child Guidance Products manufactured the Mick-a-Matic Camera: a large plastic body shaped like Micky Mouse’s head with a viewfinder in its forehead, a lens in its nose and a flash between its ears. The camera was designed for children, but photographer Stephen Shore used it throughout 1971 to take dozens of images, some of which appeared in the exhibition, All the Meat You Can Eat. These pictures marked Shore’s first artistic use of color photography.

Mickey Mouse Head Camera was Photographed as Part of the Stephen Shore Career Retrospective, on Exhibit  Through May 28th, 2018 at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Mickey Mouse Camera