Tag Archive | Cigarettes

Judith Supine Presents Golden Child; Reveals True Identity, Kind Of

Judith Supine Door Image
Judith Supine Art from the Door of Mecka Gallery. (All Photos By Gail)

The bright pink and neon green-painted wheat paste collages and sculptures of street artist Judith Supine are well known to street art aficionados, but Supine’s work has also infiltrated the galleries. Using his mother’s name as his artist persona, Judith had kept his face hidden and true identity a secret until last week, when a Video shot by Animal NY went viral on Arrested Motion and other various art blogs, in which Judith, who is an extremely handsome man, gave a candid and liberally swear word-peppered interview about his life and art.

All this was in anticipation of last Saturday’s opening of Supine’s latest exhibit, Golden Child, at Mecka Gallery, located way the hell out in an industrial area of Brooklyn, where Manhattanites fear to tread.

At this event, it was promised, the mysterious Judith Supine would openly show his face in public for the first time. Despite monsoon-esque weather conditions and travel directions that necessitated the use of a map, Geoffrey and I put on our Big Girl Panties and headed out.

Judith Supine Twins Sculpture

Judith creates his art starting with images culled from discarded magazines, which he then pieces together to create what I call “familiar mutants”: creatures that are part human and part inanimate objects. Undeniably the focal point of the evening, the imposing Twins sculpture in the photo above hangs from a ceiling beam in the center of the Mecka Gallery space with the remainder of the Golden Child exhibit hidden in a tiny back room (the doorway to which can also be seen in the above photo) that we originally mistook for a store room or “back stage” area before summoning the nads to finally check it out. Here’s what we found inside.

Judith Supine Back Room

Judith Supine Patron

Judith Supine Cigarettes

Judith Supine Back Room

Judith seems to favor integrating images of cigarettes and alcohol into his works. Discuss.

Judith Supine Print
Does this look like Miley Cyrus to you?

This Limited Edition Print of the same Image seen on the gallery door was On Sale for $150 at the opening.

See Geoffrey’s photo with Judith from the opening party at This Link. G said he thought somebody told him Judith’s real name might be “Brent” or something, but who knows.

Likewise, no one seems to be able to confirm whether Golden Child was a one-night-only affair or if the art is on display at Mecka for a few weeks, and you won’t find out by looking at their Website. It’s worth checking out though, if you’re up for an adventure!

Mecka Gallery is located at 65 Meadow Street between Bogart St. and Morgan Ave. in Brooklyn, NY 11206.

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Hank Willis Thomas What Goes Without Saying at Jack Shainman Gallery

Hank Willis Thomas I Like Dick
All Photos By Gail

Jack Shainman Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of What Goes Without Saying, Hank Willis Thomas’ third solo exhibition with the gallery. The show includes photographs, sculpture, painting and new media, all which delve into the construction of mythologies embedded in popular culture.

Hank Willis Thomas Assorted SignsKnown for his innovative use of advertising, the differences here is the globally ubiquitous language, he builds complex narratives about history, identity and race. This show brings together several facets of Thomas’ practice to explore objects and language, torn from their history, brought to our present, and repurposed to reveal the process of their agency.

Hank Willis Thomas Believe It

The works in What Goes Without Saying draw from a section of Roland Barthes’ book, Mythologies, to explore the ideas of explicit and implicit representations found in objects, gestures and phrases. By separating language from the advertising in which it appears, he effectively deconstructs the relationship between the reader and viewer.

Hank Willis Thomas Smoking Slogans In Thomas’ new carborundum works, part of the Fair Warning series, he takes text from cigarette advertising in magazines from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, retaining the font while abandoning the accompanying visuals. The decontextualized slogans like Stronger Yet Milder, Measurably Long  and Immeasurably Cool come to stand for more than just a cigarette, highlighting the adjectives used to connote power and elegance, often times with a sexual tone.

Hank Willis Thomas I Am The Greatest Button

What Goes Without Saying focuses on subtext, shifting meaning and the complexity of historical actions embedded in visual culture. These ideas are important in the context of the current election and the theater of the campaigns.

Hank Willis Thomas’s What Goes Without Saying will be on Exhibit Through November 17, 2012 at Jack Shainman Gallery, Located at 513 West 20th Street, NYC. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Hank Willis Thomas Goes Without Saying Exhibit Sign

Hank Willis Thomas 3 Signs

Must See Art: Genius By Nir Hod at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Genius is a word whose depth of meaning generally takes too long to talk about. It’s a heavy word, and the current exhibit of paintings and sculptures by Nir Hod at NYC’s Paul Kasmin Gallery, entitled Genius, is equally heavy. The Genius exhibit includes over 50 paintings and several sculptures created over a span of two years. It is the first solo exhibit at Kasmin for the Israeli-born artist, who now lives and works in New York.

The Genius portraits represent a cohesive collection of Nattily-dressed youths – aged from cherubic infants to precocious teenagers – classically posed and wearing mostly scornful expressions while also holding lit cigarettes. While the exhibit appears to be fairly straightforward, the meaning behind these paintings is far from obvious. I wondered, are these children merely playing a game of dress up taken to the extreme, or have they actually grown up too fast and become disenfranchised and jaded before completing puberty? Where did they come from, and what kind of lives do they lead? They are both delicately beautiful and profoundly sad, and that’s always an interesting combination.

According to the exhibit’s press release, these works “[continue] the artist’s longtime fascination with beauty and loneliness, glamour and death. Hod’s aristocratic young Geniuses inhabit a world of paradox, where their cherubic cheeks contrast with their scornful expressions and lit cigarettes. Like sculptures in a wax museum that aim to dramatically freeze time, these paintings explore art’s power to capture life while simultaneously elevating it to depict an unattainable ideal.” What I was reminded of most was a fusion of renaissance portraiture with the pop sensibilities of Ron English, who so often paints children in roles – such as that of a soldier or police officer – normally assumed by adults. I love art that makes me think.

Nir Hod’s artwork makes a further impact thanks to the manner in which it was hung in the gallery; staggered in clusters to fill the spaces as opposed to the more traditional single line of images across the wall (See photos from the exhibit that illustrate my point at According 2 G). This type of presentation gives the exhibit a more intimate, atmospheric vibe and helps to draw the viewer in to encourage a dialogue about what it means to be a Genius. You can read a fantastic article on Nir Hod regarding his inspiration and objectives behind this exhibit at Art In America Dot Com.

Nir Hod’s Genius is on exhibit through June 18, 2011 at the Paul Kasmin Gallery, located at 293 10th Avenue, at the corner of 27th Street in Manhattan. Gallery Hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10 AM – 6 PM.