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Modern Art Monday Presents: Peter Blume, The Eternal City

eternal city peter blume photo by gail
Photos by Gail

The Eternal City (193437) was inspired by a trip Peter Blume took to Rome in 1932 — ten years after the fascist takeover of Italy. The dictator Benito Mussolini, depicted here as a deranged Jack-in-the-box with a green head, bulging eyes and pouting red lips, dominates the composition.

He lords over a woman begging for money amid marble ruins and an incongruous shrine of a bejeweled Christ. In the distance, people wind through labyrinthine catacombs toward the Roman Forum, where they are greeted by threatening officers. A searing indictment of fascism, the painting presents a nightmarish vision of a once glorious city being steered toward ruin.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

eternal city peter blume photo by gail
Detail

Eye On Design: Porsche 911 Coupe, 1965

porsche 911 coupe photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Designed by Ferdinand Alexander ‘Butzi’ Porsche (1935 2012), grandson of the Volkswagen Beetle’s creator, the 911 (this model circa 1965) rivals its forebear as an icon of German automotive engineering.

porsche 911 photo by gail worley

A close examination reveals traits inherited from previous Porsche cars, including the raised round headlights and rear-mounted, air-cooled engine. Larger and specifically faster than its immediate predecessor, the Porsche 365, and the Beetle, the 911 in the most successful competition car ever mass produced.

Continue reading Eye On Design: Porsche 911 Coupe, 1965

Eye On Design: Chess Set By Man Ray

chess set by man ray photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

Man Ray enjoyed chess, relishing that the game, by design, requires both strategy and spontaneity to play. Though Man Ray remained “a third-rate player,” as he put it, his interest in the game “was directed towards designing new forms for chess pieces.” Manufactured in 1926 and based on his design for an earlier turned-wood set, the artist’s Chess Set (made from silver-plated and oxidized silver-plated brass) converts the familiar form of every chess piece into a more stylized shape that relies on associations — such as the connection between a king and an Egyptian pyramid — to reveal each piece’s identity. The sets tallest piece measures 4-inches high.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

chess set by man ray photo by gail worley

Modern Art Monday Presents: Stuart Davis, Lucky Strike

stuart davis lucky strike photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Stuart Davis typically painted local modern subjects in rhythmic compositions with bold colors. Among his sources of inspiration were “skyscraper architecture; the brilliant colors on gasoline stations; chain store fronts and taxi cabs“ and jazz music. Long before postwar artists mined the world of trademark brands, Davis incorporated imagery from logos, commercial signage, and packaging into his paintings, such as the branded bag of tobacco in Lucky Strike (1921). Championed by the visionary dealer Edith Halpert at her downtown Gallery, Davis’s work was met with both enthusiasm and confusion despite being engaged with the stuff and forms of modern life in New York in the 1920s.

Photographed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Eye On Design: Exterior Frieze From Frank Lloyd Wright’s Susan Lawrence Dana House

exterior frieze susan lawrence dana house photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

The Susan Lawrence Dana House (19021904), one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s earliest projects, afforded him the opportunity to experiment with design and construction techniques that would become emblematic of his Prairie Style architecture.

cast of wright frieze photo by gail worley
Cast of The Frieze

Though many European modernists shunned exterior ornament, American practitioners like Wright used it liberally to accentuate structure, with a proclivity toward geometric abstractions of nature. Applied on the upper portions of the exterior, the decorative frieze wraps around the house, forming a richly-patterned skin derived from the shape of sumac leaves — a motif applied throughout the house on windows, lamps, and decorative objects. This project is also known and the Dana-Thomas House.

exterior frieze susan lawrence dana house photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Flag Halyard Armchair By Hans Wegner

hans wegner halyard armchair photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

An iconic and dramatic lounge chair created by Hans Wegner in 1950, the Flag Halyard Armchair has a sculptural and engineered stainless steel frame with a seat and back made of plaited flag halyard. Comfort is added with a longhaired sheepskin throw and an adjustable leather headrest.

flag halyard armchair by hans wegner photo by gail worley

The story goes that Wegner conceived this design while on the beach towards the end of the 1940s. He supposedly modeled the grid-like seat in a sand dune, presumably with some old rope that lay close by (a halyard is a line that hoists or covers a sail).  The chair went into production in the 1950s and its unlikely combination of rope, painted and chrome-plated steel, sheepskin and linen are still unprecedented in furniture manufacture. Wegner’s motivation in using such contrasting materials was apparently not to exploit their textural interplay but more simply to demonstrate his ability to design innovative, practical and comfortable furniture – in any material.

flag halyard armchair by hans wegner photo by gail worley

As Hans Wegner conceived the idea for this chair while at the beach, the wide-set and low frame is naturally perfect for an afternoon rest, especially when matched with the cozy comfort of a sheepskin throw and down feather filled headrest. Reproductions of this chair, perfectly balanced and built with a solid stainless steel frame and 240 meters of textured flag line, create a modern industrial beauty that upholds the iconic style of the original Danish design, and can be found for as little as $1,650. An original will set you back about $14,000.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art on NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: The Subway By Jose Clemente Orozco

the subway photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

On his second stay in New York, Jose Clemente Orozco (18831959) made many works reflecting the city’s urban expansion and social dimension. The Subway (1928) presents several commuters on New York’s emblematic public transportation system, which first opened in 1904. The shadowy, stone-faced passengers impart a sense of melancholy to the scene, contrasting with the shiny train poles. A highly regarded artist in Mexico, Orozco struggled to find recognition in New York despite showing at several local galleries and completing a five-panel mural cycle at the New School in 1931.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.