Tag Archive | MOMA

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Toothbrushes

Pink Toothbrushes with Display
Photo By Gail

These Pink Toothbrushes with Pink Bristles are sold in the MoMA Design Store (at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC) for $5.00. The toothbrush was designed by award-winning Danish designer, Andreas Engesvik, who is probably best-known for his furniture designs. You can find them in the point-of-purchase area by the registers, displayed alongside colorful earplugs, capsule-shaped pill cases and snow globe key fobs! Art!

Pink Toothbrushes Alone

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Painterly Architectonic By Lyubov Popova

Painterly Architectonic
Photo By Gail

In 1919, Lyubov Popova (1889- 1924) described painting as “Construction,”  the building blocks of which were color and line. In this work, Painterly Architectonic (1917), brightly colored, irregularly shaped planes are layered are layered against a neutral background. The curved bottom edge of a grey shape emerging from beneath a red triangle and a white trapezoid suggests three-dimensionality, while the vibrant colors and jutting edges  that seem to extend beyond the frame evoke energetic movement. Painterly Architectonic is one of a series of works that Popova created between 1915 and 1919 is response to Kazimir Malevich’s Suprematist paintings.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Yes, It Exists: Mickey Mouse Head Camera

Mickey Mouse Camera
Photos By Gail

In 1971, Child Guidance Products manufactured the Mick-a-Matic Camera: a large plastic body shaped like Micky Mouse’s head with a viewfinder in its forehead, a lens in its nose and a flash between its ears. The camera was designed for children, but photographer Stephen Shore used it through out 1971 to take dozens of images, some of which appeared in the exhibition, All the Meat You Can Eat. These pictures marked Shore’s first artistic use of color photography

Mickey Mouse Head Camera was Photographed as Part of the Stephen Shore Career Retrospective, on Exhibit  Through May 28th, 2018 at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Mickey Mouse Camera

Eye On Design: Unisex Jumpsuit By Rudi Gernreich

Unisex Jumpsuit
All Photos By Gail

In 1970, Life magazine invited Rudi Gernreich (1922 – 1985) to envision what people would wear a decade in the future. He extended his prediction to the year 2000, illustrating men and women in matching ensembles with heads either shaved or wigged. Unlike other contemporaneous unisex styles, Gernreich’s designs did not use menswear as a baseline for women’s garments. “Women will wear pants and men will wear skits interchangeably,” he predicted. “The aesthetics of fashion are going to involve the body itself. We will train the body to grown beautifully rather than cover it to produce beauty.”

Unisex Jumpsuit Magazine Ad

Gernreich brought his concept to life for the U.S. Pavillion’s Art and Technology Program at Expo ’70, a memorable World’s Fair in Osaka, Japan. He eliminated stylistic markers of gender on his models. “Our notion of masculine and feminine are being challenged as never before.” he asserted. “The basic masculine – feminine appeal is in people, not in clothes.” These sentiments are echoed today, as fashion continues to shift its understanding of gender as fluid.

Unisex Jumpsuits with Boots Installation View
Unisex Jumpsuits with White Boots, Installation View

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Items: Is Fashion Modern, on View Through January 28th, 2018 at The Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Max Ernst, Woman, Old Man and Flower

Max Ernst Woman Old Man Flower
Photo By Gail

Max Ernst painted the first state of Woman, Old Man and Flower in 1923, the year after he moved from Cologne to Paris to join the nascent Surrealist group. He subsequently modified elements of this picture. Most astonishingly, he added the mysterious, partially transparent, partially modeled, fan-topped figure in the foreground — presumably the flower referenced in the painting’s title. Even before leaving Germany, Ernst had been thinking about translating the collage and overpainting strategies of his small Dada works on paper into oil on canvas. The results achieved included radical leaps in scale, intensified colors, and what he described to fellow Dadaist Tristan Tzara as “a much insaner effect.”

Photographed as part of the Exhibit, Max Ernst: Beyond Painting, Up Through January 1st, 2018 at the Museum of Modern Art.

Eye On Design: Issey Miyake and Dai Fujiwara, A-POC Queen

APOC Queen
All Photos By Gail

Issey Miyake and Dai Fujiwara’s A-POC Queen (1997) is a textile generated from a single thread by a computer-programmed industrial knitting machine. The resulting openwork knit tube bears a repeating pattern of woven  seams that create a patchwork of shapes whose outlines suggest dresses, shirts, socks, gloves and hats. The customer can cut along the seams without destroying the tubular structure of each individual item, and virtually no material is wasted in the process of creating — without needle or thread — a complete monochromatic outfit from this single swath of cloth.

APOC Queen Detail

For Miyake, the A-POC technique is an extension of the technological advances begun during the Industrial Revolution, which ultimately made ready-to-wear clothing possible. While automation has made fashion more accessible in some respects, it has also fostered overconsumption and waste. A-POC, an acronym for “A Piece of Cloth,” is also a play on the word epoch, a call to all to look to the next century with a sense of responsibility. “Will fashion be able to afford to keep the same old methodology?” asks Miyake. “I have endeavored to experiment to make fundamental changes to the system of making clothes.”

APOC Queen

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, Items: Is Fashion Modern, on View Through January 28th, 2018 at The Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Yayoi Kusama Christmas Tree Ornament

Kusama Ornament
All Photos By Gail

How adorable is this tiny, painted wooden tree Ornament in the likeness of our favorite living artist, Yayoi Kusama? Answer: so darn cute!

Kusama Ornament

Here she is posing next to a book about Kusama, which I bet is really cool.

Kusama Ornament

You know what else you could do is thread her on a chord and wear her around your neck like a pendant. How fashionable! I may do that.

Yayoi (pronounced “Ya-Yo-E”) Kusama Ornament can be found in the MoMA Design Store and also perhaps Online.

Kusama Ornament