Tag Archive | Clay

New Ceramic Works by Lynda Benglis at Cheim & Read

Lynda Benglis Row of Red and Yellow Sculptures
All Photos By Gail

Ground breaking sculptor/artist Lynda Benglis is always doing something interesting. Her newest work is an engaging series of abstract ceramics made in New Mexico, where she lives part time. In this exhibit at Cheim and Read, Benglis’s seemingly random shaped, clay-based sculptures retain the earthy, elemental, primal nature of clay, and highlight the material’s unique susceptibility to the artist’s touch. The variety of bold textures on each sculpture is extremely visually pleasing, and each one is unique and different.

Lynda Benglis Grey and Yellow Tire Sculpture

Lynda Benglis 3 Tire Sculptures

Lynda Benglis U-Shaped Sculpture

Benglis does not use a potter’s wheel, but hand-builds her works with tubes (you can see this technique especially in several pieces pictured in this review, which resemble lengths of tire) and slabs of clay, pinching, stacking, squeezing, pulling and smoothing them into complex sculptural compositions.

Lynda Benglis Red Sitting Sculpture

I also couldn’t help but think of the 2012 John Chamberlain exhibit, Choices, at the Guggenheim, in which the artist worked with hunks of compressed metal from junked cars. If you are looking to buy junk car indianapolis and make it for profit, visit upullandpay.com to learn more.

Lynda Benglis Red and Yellow K Sculpture
This one is my favorite.

Lynda Benglis Red Unfolded Sculpture

Sometimes wave-like and lyrical, sometimes squat and spherical, Benglis’s ceramics explore various manifestations, excavations and manipulations of form.

Lynda Benglis Red Grey Yellow Sculpture

Lynda Benglis collapses the boundaries between interior and exterior space, using both hollowed out and compacted elements which collide and fuse together reinforcing the sexual undercurrents of her muscular, polymorphic shapes. I really loved this exhibit and recommend you add a stop at Cheim and Read to your next Art Crawl.

Lynda Benglis Red With Yellow Sculpture

New Ceramic Works by Lynda Benglis will be on Exhibit Through February 15th, 2014 at Cheim & Read, located at 547 West 25th Street, NYC, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Lynda Benglis Pink Sculptures

Claire Oliver Presents Beth Cavener Stichter's Come Undone

The Adoration
Adoration By Beth Cavener Stichter

On the same evening that we visited Bethany Marchman’s collection of anthropomorphic animal oil paintings, we saw a remarkable exhibit from a sculptor exploring similar themes.

Come Undone, the new body of work by Beth Cavener Stichter, features large-scale works made from clay. Cavener Stichter cajoles the viewer into looking at the darker side of the human condition by cloaking it in animal skin. Her subjects elicit empathy, expressing complex emotions and relationships while permitting us to finally examine humanity closely enough to fully consider it — and to connect on a rare personal level.

The Adoration Detail

A life-sized sculpture of a lamb makes for an unexpected chandelier, lit from within and suspended from the ceiling.

L'Amante
L’Amante

A sensuous hare dangles a tattooed leg suggestively over the edge of its sculpture stand, all the while sustaining the piercing eye contact Cavener Stichter’s works are known to possess. Each work heightens our visual interest while dramatizing states of grace, fear, desperation and beauty.

L'Amante Detail
L’Amante (Detail)

The White Hind (The Bride)
The White Hind (The Bride) reminded us very much of This Piece.

In Bocca al Lupo

In Bocca al Lupo (We call it Wolf with Pink Vomit)

Each piece is testimony to Cavener Stichter’s truly innovative studio practice. While the properties of her chosen medium enable her an eloquence of form and surface unavailable through other media, she pushes the process further through a construction both delicate and time consuming. She begins with a solid block of terra cotta, taking care to create her signature “painterly” sweeping strokes in the clay. She then cuts the work into small, manageable sections re-work and re-articulate the musculature, skin, and fur. The next step is to painstakingly hollow out each section until it is very thin and thus fires to an extreme strength. After the kiln, she re-assembles the pieces and paints the finished work.

While the Come Undone exhibit takes up the main floor gallery, downstairs you’ll find a diverse collection of pieces by other Claire Oliver represented artists, which is just another reason a visit to this gallery is always enjoyable.

Beth Cavener Stichter’s Come Undone will be on Exhibit until October 20th, 2012 at The Claire Oliver Gallery, Located at 513 West 26th Street (Street Level) New York City.