Tag Archives: ceramic

Pink Thing of the Day: Pink Rose Made From Ceramic Plates

pink plate rose photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

David Bielander is an award-winning jewelry designer who translates simple, everyday objects into exceptional pieces of art. Here, he has transformed a set of baby pink ceramic plates and bowls into the petals of a stunning Pink Rose Sculpture, which I spotted  at the 2021 Salon Art + Design!

three plate roses photo by gail worley

Here’s what the full sculpture looks like alongside two similar rose plate sculptures. So gorgeous!

pink plate rose 2 photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Booth for Ornamentum Gallery, which is Located in Hudson, NY.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Patti Warashina, Gold Finger

patti warashina goldfinger photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Patti Warashina’s Kilns series subversively undermined the macho “cult of the kiln”: a phrase used to coin the sexist culture that surrounded kiln-building during the mid-twentieth century. As a ceramics student at the University of Washington, Warashina observed that kiln-building lessons were directed towards men, while surface decoration was the jurisdiction of women.

gold finger photo by gail worley

In response,  she created a pointed feminist critique, taking symbolic control over the image. Gold Finger (1973) can be read as a female stereotype imposed on a male one, with its shiny gilt decorative surface and two protruding fingers, their nails painted bright red. Fairy-tale depictions of beanstalks and peas further emphasize the playful yet gendered imagery, exposing problematic conventions.

gold finger photo by gail worley

Photographed in the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan.

Ceramic Mosaics on East 3rd Street

united we stand mosaic photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Each day in NYC there is something to newly discover, no matter how long it’s been there.  I am rarely on the block of East 3rd Street between Avenues A and B, but I had occasion to walk that block during this past Sunday’s lovely snow storm. Because I always have an eye peeled for things that might be fun for the blog, I made the charming discovery that most of the buildings on the north side of the block (because that is the side I was on) have these cute and colorful ceramic tile mosaics on their facades, mostly around the doorways and near the steps.

letter g mosaic photo by gail worley
It’s a G Thing

I’m not positive, but my guess is that these are the work of Jim Powers, aka the Mosaic Man, since he is responsible for most of the ceramic mosaics in the East Village. The mosaics are made from bits of tiles, marbles, broken china, mirror shards, bottles and other assorted found objects. They are beautiful and amazing works of art.

See More Mosaic Art After The Jump!

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Ceramic Cabbage Teapot

ceramic cabbage teapot photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

How did an ancient Asian tradition become something quintessentially British? The fashion for Tea drinking in Great Britain started at court in the later seventeenth century and spread among the aristocracy. Tea remained a heavily taxed luxury until a century later, 1n 1784, when tea duties were slashed from 119 to 12.5 percent, making it affordable to the general public.

In the eighteenth century, the rise of the East India Company — founded to trade with India, Southeast Asia, and China — led to a British monopoly on tea distribution. This global grip established the nation’s mercantile empire, critically dependent on colonial occupation and the movement of slaves. In 1771, American colonists famously protested Britain’s commercial control, dumping imported tea into Boston Harbor during the Boston Tea Party.

ceramic cabbage teapot photo by gail worley

Ambitious British pottery manufacturers and retailers leveraged tea’s popularity to their advantage, cultivating an enormous national ceramics industry. Vastly expanded production yielded new wares, materials and consumers. Profit margins on ceramics were slim, so quality mattered, as did efficiency. Resources and skills were often shared, as innovative makers sprung up and sometimes quickly failed. These developments signaled a shift — creative and economic — toward mass manufacture in a remarkably nimble market, generating a booming export industry for Britain as a result

Photographed in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Frida The Fortune Teller By Susan Elliott

Frida The Fortune Teller
Photos By Gail

This fantastic, ceramic mosaic portrait of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, entitled Frida The Fortune Teller, was created by Hastings, UK-based artist Susan Elliott.  Intricately composed from found ceramics mounted on board, the work combines still life and classic portraiture with the timeless art of mosaic-making to create a stunning modern  sculpture. Elliott’s  practice includes other works made from found and recycled ceramic kitchen crockery, tourist mementos, novelty mugs, and badges, which are then are woven into more traditional mosaic tesserae (one of the small pieces used in mosaic work), creating multi faceted, jewel-like and iconic images. Priced at just $3900, Frida The Fortune Teller is one of my favorite pieces seen at this fall’s installment of the Affordable Art Fair NY, where this photo was taken this past weekend.

Ceramic Flower Crown

I even felt a bit nostalgic looking at Frida’s gorgeous flower crown of delicate pink, white and yellow ceramic roses and recognizing them as being quite similar to a small ceramic floral bouquet found in the home where I grew up.  If you missed Susan’s beautiful and unique art at the AAFNY,  you can see more of her cool mosaic portraits, including those of pop culture icons like David Bowie and Amy Winehouse, and get contact information for galleries in the UK that represent her, at This Link!