Tag Archive | Clouds

Erik Jones, Twenty Sixteen at Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Erik Jones Split Heart
Death From Above: The End Is Nigh (All Photos By Gail)

After a leisurely, scenic walk on the High Line, Geoffrey and I showed up fashionably late at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery for the opening reception of Erik Jones‘ new exhibit of collage paintings, Twenty Sixteen, which is the name of the year that we are in right now! By the time we got there, the place was really packed. Scroll down to see a photo of the hot crowd action!

Where The Gods Go
Where The Gods Go

Erik Jones challenges viewers to see beauty in his chaotic, mixed-media works that merge nude subjects with nonrepresentational, abstract elements. Describing the human figures in his compositions as “aesthetic anchors,” they are the calming foreground upon which bursts of color, stenciled shapes and custom-made stickers create surreal landscapes. Using multiple mediums, such as watercolor, acrylic, colored pencils, wax pastels and oil paint, Jones’ portraits are technically complex and express a heightened sense of realism.

The Forbidden Words
The Forbidden Words

The relationship between Jones’ subjects and the abstract motifs that engulf them can be interpreted as conceptual fashion design. His portraits are dressed in a stunning hurricane of color and geometric patterns, suiting the needs of the individual while also maintaining their own autonomous beauty.

The Nation
The Nation

Along with Jones’ hypnotic portraits, Twenty Sixteen features a selection of works where the human form is removed, creating purely abstract environments. Sporadically placed symbols, silhouettes and a unique coded alphabet created by the artist fosters a subjective narrative he refers to as dialogue aesthetics.

Welcome
Welcome

I really liked the ones with all the fun stickers, more than the nudes, because I am five.

Erik Jones

While this body of work may appear like a dreamlike universe, Jones does not view his paintings as depicting fantasy; they exist in front of the viewer, placed on canvases and paper with skill and thoughtful reverie, as if looking at a real living being.

Erik Jones Detail
Smiling Pineapple Detail

Twenty Sixteen reminded me of a cross between This Exhibit and This Other Exhibit, and you may understand why I would make that comparison, if you can be bothered to click on those two links; which is something I  never count on.

Erik Jones’ Twenty Sixteen will be on Exhibit Through April 30th  2016 at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at  529 West 20th Street, 9th Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Gallery Crowd
Look at the Crowd!

The Big Rock
The Big Rock

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Yes, It Exists: Minions Fart Gun Candy Tin

Minions Fart Gun
Photo By Gail

This adorable tin shaped like a Minion holding one of their dreaded Fart Guns is actually filled with tiny Cocoa Flavored, Cloud-Shaped Candies.

Fart Candy

This is what the candy looks like: little chocolate farts. Tasty!

Photographed at It’s Sugar, Located at 1318 Surf Avenue in Coney Island, Brooklyn.

Super Mario Clouds By Cory Arcangel

Super Mario Clouds
Photo By Gail

For this installation, entitled Super Mario Clouds (2002), Cory Arcangel hacked into and modified a cartridge of a Super Mario Bros, the blockbuster Nintendo videogame released in the United States in 1985. By tweaking the game’s code, the artist erased all of the audio and visual elements except for the iconic, fluffy white clouds that scroll endlessly across the bright blue sky.

Arcangel, who is trained as a musician, considers computers and video game consoles as his instruments; he will often learn a new programming language in order to develop an artwork. Viewers cannot handle the console on display here, but they can model their own version: Arcangel provides detailed instructions as well as the code for re-creating this project on his website.

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in NYC.

Tara Donovan’s Styrofoam Cup Cloud Installation

Tara Donovan Cloud
Photos By Gail

If you happen to be doing the tourist thing in the city of Boston, you absolutely cannot miss the opportunity to visit the Museum of Fine Arts, which, like The Met here in NYC, is massive, and has a little bit of everything that an art lover wants to see, all under one roof. It is really quite a remarkable place.

Favorite areas of the museum, for me, are the Contemporary Art galleries, which make amazing use of the space with several installations placed against the high vaulted ceilings. One such piece is Tara Donovan’s Untitled, (2003); a representation of a cumulus cloud formation, which she created solely from Styrofoam cups stuck together with hot glue.

Untitled Clouds

This piece is not only very beautiful, but it also encourages imaginative extrapolation as to how the Brooklyn-based artist chooses her materials. You can read more about that at This Link.

Olaf Bruening Clouds In Central Park

Olaf Breuning Clouds
All Photos By Gail

Just in time for Spring, Olaf Breuning’s installation, Clouds arrived in Central Park on March 4th. The six Bright Blue Clouds tower nearly 35 feet above the plaza at the intersection of 5th Avenue and 60th Street just on the border of the Park. Held aloft among the trees by rudimentary steel supports, the Clouds are made of polished and painted aluminum and were cut to match a hand drawing by the artist.

Olaf Breuning Clouds View Towards Park
View of Clouds Looking Towards The Park

Calling to mind the set design of a school play or child-like drawings of the sky, the idea for this work is inspired by one of the artist’s staged photographs. For that earlier work, Breuning used cranes and cherry pickers to raise large blue drawings of clouds high in the air, creating a momentary scene to be captured by the camera.

Olaf Breuning Clouds View Towards 5th Ave
Clouds View Looking Towards 5th Ave

The exhibit is supported by Public Art Fund. Find out more about the Clouds installation at This Link!

Olaf Breuning Clouds Signage

Dean West and Nathan Sawaya Present In Pieces

In Pieces Exhibit Signage
All Photos By Gail

It’s been a true pleasure to discover the art and follow the career of Lego Brick artist Nathan Sawaya over the past few years. I’ve enjoyed Nathan’s Brick by Brick and Red exhibits at the Agora Gallery in Chelsea, and now he has collaborated with photographer Dean West for In Pieces — something completely different indeed!

Geoffrey and I attended a private opening reception for In Pieces on Thursday, February 28th and were blown away by this series of minimalist tableau photographs by Dean West, which digitally incorporate Sawaya’s playful but realistic Lego sculptures. Please enjoy my photographs from the exhibit accompanied by narrative from the show’s official press release.

Train Depot Photo
Train

Lego Train Tracks
Lego Track Sculpture

Nathan Close up from Train Depot Photo
Nathan Sawaya!

The project is a series of tableau compositions based on ideas about nature, culture, society and, more specifically, identity. Identity as a cultural creation has been heavily commercialized and manipulated, and we prominently portray this through a highly stylized representation of contemporary life. The integration of Sawaya’s unique sculpture is key to the series’ narrative and aesthetic.

Bus Stop Photo
Bus

Lego Mannequin
Lego Mannequin from Store Window

Lego Dog
Lego Dog

The images have been constructed using modern photography techniques, combined with specially sculpted LEGO® objects placed within the scenes. The combination not only builds on and accentuates the images’ aesthetic, but also compels the viewer to deconstruct each tableau, thereby exposing elements of the construction of cultural identity itself.

Pool Photo
Pool

Lego Flip Flops and Towel
Lego Flip Flops and Towel (Nathan Sawaya at rear of photo on his Smart Phone)

Isolated individuals stand in recognizable but chillingly empty minimalist scenes with geometrical design, derived from common features of the American landscape. Their averted eyes gaze into nothingness, and a strange feeling of aloofness and displacement reverberates. Unique talent has been incorporated into the tableaux, with elongated limbs, referencing society’s idealized bodies.

Movie Marquee Red Dress Photo
Dress

A dress made of LEGO bricks looks more like pixels breaking off into the blowing wind. Juxtaposed against a desolate, American realist environment, the images are appealing, yet eerily ambiguous- a very engaging and unforgettable effect.

Girl In Red Dress Close Up
Dress Close Up

Red Lego Dress Rear Shot
Lego Red Dress

Referencing the aesthetic of the American Postcard in both the style and content- the series has been color graded with pastels such as warm yellows and pale blues. The imagery, from a distance, appears entirely photographic. However, as the viewer begins to digest the images, the series reveals its brick by brick fabricated construction. The [layered] process also represents the direct processes involved with digital photography today. Clear references to pixilation and technology are apparent through stylized manipulation and digital enhancements.

Hotel Photo
Hotel

Cloud Constellation
Cloud Constellation from Hotel

Cloud Underside
Cloud Detail

In Pieces by Nathan Sawaya and Dean West will be on Exhibit at Avant Gallery (at the Openhouse Gallery), Located at 201 Mulberry Street (Between Kenmare and Spring) through March 17th, 2013. The exhibition will be open daily from 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM.
Avant Gallery Shot