Tag Archives: Sunset

Must See Exhibit: Andy Warhol Prints at the National Arts Club

Do you like Andy Warhol? I sure do. He is by far my favorite artist (living or dead) and it always seems like, even when I think I have seen all of his works, there is something new to discover.

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Instagram Photo of The Week: Sunset in The Berkshires

Hello dear readers, and welcome to the beginning of a new week, or the end of an old  week, depending on your perspective. I’m enjoying the final two days of a beautiful long weekend in the Berkshires. This is a photo of Saturday night’s sunset in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Simply breathtaking.

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Instagram Photo of The Week: Cloud in a Glass

Over the Labor Day weekend, I snapped this photo while sitting on the deck of my friend’s Hamptons Beach House, just as the sun was setting. This was more about capturing a Friday-evening-moment of relaxing with a glass of wine than making art, but what was unexpected is how a cloud’s reflection is seen in the remaining wine in my glass. Cloud in a glass.

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David Hammons Day’s End at Pier 52

days end david hammons photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

One of the great things about public art is how the viewer can have such a wholly unique experience of the piece depending on the time of day it is viewed. In the case of  Day’s End, the new, permanent sculpture by David Hammons (b. 1943), I saw it up-close for the first time at, well, day’s end. Watching the sun set through the sculpture and dip behind the New Jersey skyline was a beautiful thing to behold, especially as many of us are only just now able to walk outside free of masks for the first time in over a year.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: John Frederick Kensett, Sunset on the Sea

Sunset on The Sea
Photo By Gail

Disarming in its simplicity and stripped of all staging and framing devices,  John Frederick Kensett’s Sunset on The Sea (1872) draws the viewer into a direct  experience of nature in a depiction of a radiant sun suspended above the open ocean. Kensett resisted adding his characteristic small sailboats or landmasses to the composition; divorcing the scene from a specific location, he moved toward abstraction.

Seamlessly blending sea and sky, warmth and coolness, stillness and drama, the work seems to reverberate with Kensett’s earlier encounter with the atmospheric landscapes of the British artist JMW Turner, which the artist saw on his initial trip to London in 1840. Part of a group known as his Last Summer’s Work, it is probably Kensett’s most radical portrayal among his explorations of Connecticut’s coastal landscape and was found in his studio at the time of his death. The painting was mentioned at his memorial service, when it was described as “Pure light and water.”

Sunset on The Sea was Photographed in The Met Breuer (former home of The Whitney Museum), in Manhattan, where it is part of the Museum’s Inaugural Exhibit, Unfinished: Thoughts Left Visible. The piece is part of the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, also in New York City.

Pink Thing of The Day: Mary Heilmann, Sunset at the Whitney Museum

Sunset
All Photos By Gail

A distinguishing feature of the new Whitney Museum in the meatpacking district is this work by Mary Heilmann, attached to the northern facade of the building, which is called Sunset.  A burst of bright pink, Sunset is a site specific installation that inaugurates the museum’s largest outdoor gallery and transforms it into a place of reverie, memory and leisure.

Mary Heilmann became known in the 197os for vibrant paintings that married taut, abstract forms with quivering line and vivid color. For more than thirty years, she has intermittently explored a stair-step motif bushed within rectangular fields or expressed through irregularly-shaped canvases, which happen to rhyme with the dramatic setbacks and grid lines of the Whitney’s new building. This serendipitous connection inspired Heilmann to enlarge a detail of one such painting and print it onto two large panels that playfully turn the building itself into her canvas and tweak its sharp geometries.

Sunset

Heilmann’s intervention extends to a group of sculptural chairs scattered on the terrace like a shower of confetti. Adapted from furniture that she has displayed in homes and exhibitions, the chairs serve as elements in her larger composition and encourage visitors to interact with one another and the cityscape beyond.

 Mary Heilmann Chairs

Fatal Attraction: Photographs By Piotr Uklański at the Met

Lips
All Photos By Gail

During our most recent Art Safari to the vast and spectacular Met, we were thrilled by Fatal Attraction, an exhibit of photography from the New York–based artist Piotr Uklański (born Poland, 1968). This exhibition, the first to survey Uklański’s photography, locates his work with the camera at the center of his artistic practice. Reveling in moribund or marginal artistic languages from a position at once ironic and sincere, the artist simultaneously subverts and pays homage to defunct modes of expression.

Flame

Uklański’s underappreciated yet historically significant series The Joy of Photography (1997–2007) explores clichés of popular photography using the kitschy subjects and hackneyed effects of Eastman Kodak’s how-to manual for the serious amateur.

Geese
Swans, Intentionally Blurry

Whereas artists of the 1980s, such as Richard Prince, appropriated such images by rephotographing them to reveal their constructed nature, Uklański remade them, in a manner akin to slightly irreverent cover versions of songs that bring out hidden or repressed aspects of his source material.

Psychedelic Skull and Crossbones

In this way, the artist both acknowledges appropriation’s endgame — that there are no new pictures under the sun — while creating a space for the creation of new works.

Waterfall

As an example, here is a blurb from the exhibit that accompanies this photograph of a Waterfall.

“As a photographic subject, the waterfall is so ubiquitous that it is invisible – a natural form that has been subsumed into an image via millions of snapshot mementos, postcards, and artistic renderings. Instead of looking for the impossible – a “new” picture of a waterfall – Uklanski presents the viewer with a dutifully exact representation of the camera’s capabilities as prescribed by Eastman Kodak – until the 1980s, as powerful a shaper of how Americans saw the world as Disney or any presidency. In conflating the roles of the amateur, professional and fine artist, Uklanski was also commenting, ironically – from a European perspective – on how Americans can turn even leisure activities into forms of work and self-improvement.”

Sunset

Tulips
Tulips, Intentionally Blurry

Fatal Attraction: Photographs by Piotr Uklański, will be on Exhibit Through August 16th, 2015 in Gallery 851, 2nd Floor of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Located at 1000 Fifth Ave at 81st Street, New York, NY.

Fatal Attraction Signage