Tag Archive | Color Field

Modern Art Monday Presents: Paul Feeley, Formal Haut

Paul Feeley Formal Haut By Gail Worley
Photo By Gail

Paul Feeley (19101966) has often been associated with Color Field painters, but his most recognized works, largely made between 1962 and 1965, stand apart from those of his peers for their economy of color and spare compositions.  Formal Haut (1965), produced the year before Feeley’s death, features his signature forms, namely a single jack (inspired by the game of jacks) and repeated baluster shapes. Their convex and concave contours interlock in a symmetrical arrangement, centered within the square frame. The simple geometric design is highlighted by an equally uncomplicated palette, limited to just two contrasting colors on unprimed canvas.

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, The Fullness of Color: 1960s Painting, On Through August 2nd, 2020 at the Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan.

Mary Heilmann Geometrics: Waves, Roads, etc. at 303Gallery

Rose Wave
Rose Wave (All Photos By Gail)

303 Gallery is currently hosting an exhibition of new works by Mary Heilmann, whose work you might remember from This Post.

Rotate
Rotate

On view are an arrangement of paintings on canvas and handmade paper, glazed ceramics, and a group of her distinctive furniture sculptures.

Cups on a Table
Cups on a Table

Wryly poking around the history of abstract painting, Heilmann’s imaginative approach to the geometries of spaces, things and thoughts has made her one of the foremost painters of her generation. Adopting waves and roads as inspiration for many of the works in this show, her deft perceptive logics suggest simultaneously intimate and expansive experiences.

Highway My Way
Highway My Way

In Heilmann’s paintings, waves and roads each generate their own sources of life. They move and travel and interlock. Positive and negative space inhabit alternating roles, as colors riff on memory in vibrant undulations as well as protracted expanses. Heilmann’s geometrics abut forms and steer the eye backward between them and seemingly through them.

Maricopa Highway
Maricopa Highway

San Andreas

In San Andreas (2012), a glowing red core pokes through chunks of earthy green glazed ceramic, its tactile surface bubbling with tension. In The Geometry of a Wave, a tiny painting on paper suggests an entire universe in two colors. Pigment pools in the paper’s irregular crevices, as a wave’s fragile surface is rendered with a penetrating directness.

First Date
First Date

In his memoir Barbarian Days, William Finnegan writes of the hallucinatory power of surfing, “It was as if we were suspended above the reef, floating on a cushion of nothing . . . Approaching waves were like optical illusions.” Heilmann’s own waves begin to depict a similar imagery with their synchronic positives and negatives. What seems like a simple gestural game drifts into the essential, into an intuitive understanding of a form’s resonance and a furtive ability to shape it.

Sunny Chaise 10 and 4
Heilmann’s Sunny Chaise #10 and #4 shown at the Exhibit Opening Reception

To that end, Heilmann’s installation of her signature chairs encourages viewers to sit, linger and engage in dialogue with the paintings, with each other, and with themselves. To sit and watch the waves, to hit the road.

Left and Right
Left and Right

The edges of the paintings point at each other; one can imagine the air between them as tactile. If a painting has its own language, why not try to speak with it?

Mary Heilmann’s Geometrics: Waves, Roads, etc. will be on Exhibit Through December 19th, 2015 at 303 Gallery, Located at 507 W 24th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Geometric Left
Geometric Left

Mary Heilmann Signage

FLAG Art Foundation Presents Surface Tension

Sterling Ruby SP301
Sterling Ruby, SP301 (All Photos By Gail)

If you dig Abstract and Colorfield paintings, then you are going to love Flag Art Foundation’s current group show, Surface Tension. This dynamic group show focuses on a selection of contemporary artists whose approach to abstraction incorporates a range of materials, processes, and techniques — such as sanding, stitching, dying, and layering — to draw attention to the dynamic potential of a painting’s surface. Artists include:

El Anatsui, Mark Bradford, Kadar Brock, Cecily Brown, Sarah Crowner, Sam Gilliam, Sterling Ruby, Sean Scully, Ryan Sullivan, Lesley Vance, Rebecca Ward, and Garth Weiser.

Inspired by Los Angeles gang culture and the use graffiti as a means of ‘tagging’ territories, Sterling Ruby’s mark-making presents a timely alternative to classic painterly techniques. Ruby’s atmospheric spray painting SP301, 2014 (top photo), organizes the canvas in bands of pink, acid green, and black, varying in shading and intensity as a product of using readily available aerosol paints.

Sarah Crowner, Untitled Leaves, 2015

The materiality of canvas plays a central role in Sarah Crowner’s Untitled (Leaves), 2015, a diptych of sewn, painted panels that plays with repetition of color and form.

Kadar Brock, Deredemirtdxii(mmb)

Kadar Brock’s deredemirtdxii, 2015, was constructed, or more accurately worn down, through a labor-intensive (and often repeated) process of underpainting, priming, and power-sanding, producing a work whose tattered and marbled composition serves as evidence to its making.

View from Flag Patio

In addition to the lovely artworks, Flag also has a spectacular scenic patio from which you can see the sunset over New Jersey, and watch ships come in to port. Nice.

Surface Tension will be on Exhibit Through December 12th, 2015, at FLAG Art Foundation, Located at West 545 25th Street, 9th Floor, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World, at MOMA

Mary Weatherford Coney Island II
Mary Weatherford, Coney Island II (All Photos By Gail)

Well, the Matisse exhibit may now be only a memory, and Sturtevant’s Double Trouble only runs for 10 more days, but there’s still a fantastic contemporary painting exhibit at MOMA that you can see into April! Joy!

Dianna Molzen Untitled
Dianna Molzen, Untitled

The Forever Now presents the work of 17 artists whose paintings reflect a singular approach that characterizes our cultural moment at the beginning of this new millennium: they refuse to allow us to define or even meter our time by them.

Matt Connors Telescope
Matt Connors, Telescope

This phenomenon in culture was first identified by the science fiction writer William Gibson, who used the term “a-temporality” to describe a cultural product of our moment that paradoxically doesn’t represent, through style, through content, or through medium, the time from which it comes. A-temporality, or timelessness, manifests itself in painting as an historical free-for-all, where contemporaneity as an indicator of new form is nowhere to be found, and all eras coexist.

Charline von Heyl Carlotta
Charline von Heyl, Carlotta

A profligate mixing of past styles and genres can be identified as a kind of hallmark for our moment in painting, with artists achieving it by reanimating historical styles or recreating a contemporary version of them, sampling motifs from across the timeline of 20th-century art in a single painting or across an oeuvre, or radically paring their language down to the most archetypal forms.

Michael Williams Does it Hurt to be Crazy
Michael Williams, Does it Hurt to be Crazy

The artists in this exhibition represent a wide variety of styles and impulses, but all use the painted surface as a platform, map, or metaphoric screen on which genres intermingle, morph, and collide. Their work represents traditional painting, in the sense that each artist engages with painting’s traditions, testing and ultimately reshaping historical strategies like appropriation and bricolage and reframing more metaphysical, high-stakes questions surrounding notions of originality, subjectivity, and spiritual transcendence.

Mary Weatherford North Chester Avenue
Mary Weatherford, North Chester Avenue

The Forever Now exhibition includes works by Richard Aldrich, Joe Bradley, Kerstin Brätsch, Matt Connors, Michaela Eichwald, Nicole Eisenman, Mark Grotjahn, Charline von Heyl, Rashid Johnson, Julie Mehretu, Dianna Molzan, Oscar Murillo, Laura Owens, Amy Sillman, Josh Smith, Mary Weatherford, and Michael Williams.

Matt Connors Variable Foot
Matt Connors, Variable Foot

The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World will be on Exhibit Through April 5th, 2015 at The Museum of Modern Art, Located at 11 West 53rd Street (Between Fifth and Sixth Avenues) in NYC.

The Forever Now Signagae

Modern Art Monday Presents: Slow Swirl at the Edge of the Sea By Mark Rothko

Slow Swirl at the Edge of the Sea
Photo By Gail

From Moma Dot Org:

Slow Swirl at the Edge of the Sea pictures two creatures dancing between sea and sky, surrounded by arabesques, spirals, and stripes. The forms “have no direct association with any particular visible experience, but in them one recognizes the principle and passion of organisms,” Rothko said. For him art was “an adventure into an unknown world”; like the Surrealists before him, Rothko looked inward, to his own unconscious mind, for inspiration and material for his work.

Mark Rothko applied the paint in transparent layers — a practice he retained when he abandoned representational images and began to develop his large–scale color field paintings a few years later.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Ellsworth Kelly, Spectrum V

Ellsworth Kelly Spectrum V
Photo By Gail

I want you to appreciate that I had to wait patiently for about 15 minutes for a child and her oblivious mom to stop effing around in front of this 13 panel color field installation that makes up legendary minimalist Ellsworth Kelly’s Spectrum V (1969) before I could (finally) get this photo. You’re welcome.

Ellsworth Kelly (1923 – 2015) was an American painter, sculptor, and printmaker associated with hard-edge painting, Color Field painting and the minimalist school. His works demonstrate unassuming techniques emphasizing simplicity of form, similar to the work of John McLaughlin and Kenneth Noland. Kelly often employs bright colors. He lived and worked in Spencertown, New York.

Spectrum V, a gift of the artist, is part of the permanent collection in the Modern Art wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Hauser & Wirth Presents Selections from the Reinhard Onnasch Collection

Claes Oldenberg
Claes Oldenberg Model for a Mahogany Plug, Scale B. 1969 (All Photos By Gail)

Hauser & Wirth’s cavernous space at 511 West 18th Street is currently hosting a selection of works from the collection of Reinhard Onnasch. A celebration of Onnasch’s longstanding passion for art and collecting, Re-View: Onnasch Collection is curated by Paul Schimmel, celebrated post-war scholar and Partner of Hauser Wirth & Schimmel.

Christo Wrapped Road Sign 1963
Christo Wrapped Road Sign 1963

The exhibition focuses on the period between 1950 and 1970, decades when New York’s cultural influence was unrivaled and some of the most important artistic movements of the 20th century were born. On view will be iconic examples of Pop Art, Fluxus, Color Field, Assemblage, Minimalism and Abstract Expressionism.

Claes Oldenberg Soft Medicine Cabinet
Claes Oldenberg Soft Medicine Cabinet, 1966

The collection will be on exhibit through April 12th, 2014.

Matthew Marks Gallery Presents Ellsworth Kelly at Ninety

Ellsworth Kelly at Ninety Red
All Photos By Gail

Legendary painter Ellsworth Kelly will celebrate ninety years on the planet on May 31st, 2013. In honor of his seven decades spent shaping and contributing to the world of modern art, Matthew Marks Gallery is hosting exhibits of Kelley’s work in three of its Chelsea gallery spaces. These paintings and sculptures are classic representations of Kelley’s signature Color Field works and his grounding in the minimalist school of painting.

Ellsworth Kelly at Ninety Blue and Yellow

Ellsworth Kelly at Ninety Black and White

Ellsworth Kelly With Friends 2013
Elsworth Kelly (Center) Chats with Friends outside the Matthew Marks Gallery on West 22nd Street at the Show’s Opening Reception

Happy Birthday Mr. Kelly and thank you for your beautiful art!

Ellsworth Kelly at Ninety Reflective C

Ellsworth Kelly at Ninety will be on view through June 29, 2013 at Matthew Marks’ three gallery spaces, Located at 502 and 522 West 22nd Street, and 523 West 24th Street, New York. Gallery Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Ellsworth Kelly at Ninety Red and Black Bars

Nyehaus Presents Peter Alexander New Resin Works

Pink Signage for Peter Alexander Show
This Sign Says: Peter Alexander New Resin Works (All Photos By Gail, Click on any Image to Enlarge)

Nyehaus Gallery, located in a gorgeous restored brownstone on West 20th Street, has launched an exciting exhibition of new resin works by pioneering California-based Light and Space artist, Peter Alexander. This exhibit was a delightful companion piece to the Keith Sonnier exhibit I saw at Mary Boone last month, being all about minimalism, color and the interaction of light and art.

Red Square By Peter Alexander

Red and Green Perspective By Peter Alexander

Alexander described these works – in which fields of what initially appears to be one color vary in their gradation and degree of saturation – as being, “Like what water does on coastlines when you fly above it, that movement from saturated color to transparency where it fades and becomes part of the sand. I’m interested in addressing that moment with this work, when the whole piece becomes part of a greater thing, part of the air. It addresses the room it’s in. It wants to become a part of the room by disappearing into it.”

Pale Pink Square By Richard Alexander

Based on impressions I got from perusing Nyehaus’s Online Catalog of Alexander’s resin works (way worth checking out at that link, by the way), I was expecting a greater number of pieces in this exhibit. Sadly, there is only a fraction of the works on display throughout Nyehaus’s three floors of gallery space. Still, it is worth a trip for fans of color and minimalism.

What I love about Alexander’s work is how it challenges the viewer’s ways of seeing. In contrast to traditional paint on canvas, resin affords these works endless ability to play with the light of the rooms in which they are displayed. It’s challenging to capture the subtleties with a point and shoot camera, but very much in evidence when experiencing the artworks in person. I’ve tried to show the contrast in the shots below:

Blue Square Perspective By Peter Alexander

Blue Square Viewed from Hallway Outside Gallery

Blue Square By Peter Alexander

Blue Square Viewed from Close Up

Blue Square Detail By Peter Alexander

Blue Square Edge Detail

Beverages

Another fun and inviting aspect of any opening reception at Nyehaus is the fact that they always serve a selection of delicious Latin dishes, prepared fresh in the Nyehaus open kitchen. These days, many galleries have even cut back on serving wine at openings, so to have a full meal prepared for you is simply unheard of on the Chelsea gallery scene.

Pita and DipsServing food also boosts the social aspect of these gatherings, breaks down walls and brings people together. It’s such a great idea and so generous of Nyehaus.

Chicken Skewers

Latin Food

New Resin Works by Peter Alexander will be on Display at Nyehaus, located at 358 West 20th Street (just East of 9th Avenue) until April 20th, 2013. Gallery Hours are Tuesday to Saturday from 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Six Rod Array

Pink and Green Rod