Tag Archives: george segal

Girl On a Chair By George Segal

Girl on a Chair
All Photos By Gail

George Segal (1924 – 2000) was an innovator in sculpture known for his installations of white plaster figures with ghostly appearances. He depicted the dignity in everyday life, showing people poised at a bus stop, paused before a Traffic Intersection, or conversing on a park bench. Segal’s work also took on political themes such as the Holocaust and gay pride. At the time the Girl On a Chair (1970) sculpture was created, the artist discussed its art historical references:

“The chair is like a ladder with steps, the box is like a house, the girl is like a Greek caryatid holding up the roof…I’ve always liked the hardness and softness combined, this wedding of organic and geometric.”

Photographed in the Brooklyn Museum.

Girl on a Chair

George Segal: Walk, Don’t Walk at the Whitney Museum

Walk Don't Walk
All Photos By Gail

The past weekend, Geoffrey and I paid our first visit to the new and — dare I say — much improved Whitney Museum on Gansevoort Street in the Meat Packing District, and we had the time of our lives! I took hundreds of rad photos, some of which I will be sharing with you in the coming weeks. I am especially smitten with this installation/sculpture thing by George Segal (1924 – 2000), which is called Walk, Don’t Walk (1976). I  saw Segal’s work in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston last summer and I think his stuff is pretty cool.

Walk Don't Walk