Tag Archive | Chair

Eye On Design: Cozy Chair By Hannes Grebin

Cozy Chair Installation View
Cozy Chair Installation View in the Todd Merrill Studio Booth at The Salon New York (All Photos By Gail)

An annual favorite NYC design event is now behind us for the year, but you can bet I’ll be featuring many of the most spectacular pieces of art furniture from The Salon Art + Design in these pages in the coming weeks. Let’s kick off with a unique chair from Berlin-based, Bauhaus educated, multi-disciplinary designer Hannes Grebin, who has created upholstered seating inspired by questioning traditional domestic decor. Applying the principals of Cubism to design, Grebin masterfully deconstructs the traditional shapes and detailing of a ‘Dad’s Chair’ into simplified geometric shapes and interlocking planes. Presenting The Cozy Chair!

Cozy Chair By Hannes Grebin

Grebin describes the chair as a ‘living sculpture,’ which puts the traditional views about comfort and taste into question. The Cozy Chair is a wing-back style that dates back centuries, but has here been re-analyzed, broken down and reassembled into something quite new and different.

Cozy Chair By Hannes Grebin

It is both fractured and asymmetric, but perfectly meets the demands of ergonomics. Angular and yet cozy, sculptural and yet functional, Grebin has struck a unique balance that makes The Cozy Chair an alluring work of design. The faceted planes meet elegantly giving the chair changing perspectives with each glance. His design is both a deconstruction and commentary on the mechanization of modern life.

Cozy Chair By Hannes Grebin

Working with a master upholster in Berlin, the resulting seating is hand-crafted with the highest possible level of materials and workmanship. Grebin, the son of two architects notes, “Ultimately, I didn’t want to make just furniture. It was much more important for me that although all objects function, the design objects should become objects for discussion, in order to lead the theoretical design discourse to new ways and approaches.”

Available by commission from the designer; visit Todd Merrill Studio with all inquiries.

Eye On Design: David Bowie Aladdin Sane Chair

David Bowie Chair Installation View
Story and All Photos By Gail Worley

A definite “Oh, Wow!” moment at the recent BDNY show — (boutique design for the hospitality industry) at Javits Center — occurred when I walked into the booth for Century Industries. Because: David Bowie Chair.

David Bowie Chair Seat Detail
David Bowie Chair, Seat Detail

This gorgeous side chair, upholstered in vinyl imprinted with images of David Bowie from the Aladdin Sane era, is a show-stopper for sure.  The chair was designed by Century designer Lenny Levine in collaboration with Heloise Godin, another talented designer in the firm’s Connecticut office. Lenny was happy to fill me in on the chair’s origin story.

David Bowie Chair Back Detail
David Bowie Chair Back Support Detail

Heloise and I tried a few different mock-ups before deciding on the model you saw at BDNY,” Lenny told me. “Only two chairs of the Bowie print have been made so far. There’s another, slightly different version in our Connecticut showroom, with a black frame instead of chrome, where the artwork has darker tones, and there are no images of Bowie around the sides of the cushions. We have made this style of chair with different prints and metal finishes for shows such as HD (Hospitality Design) Expo in Las Vegas and HCD (Healthcare Design Conference & Expo) in New Orleans, which were both earlier this year. These design shows are all part of the launchpad for introducing the printed chair line.

Lenny enthusiastically admits to being a Bowie fan. “The image of David Bowie as Aladdin Sane was chosen because Bowie is synonymous with great art and high fashion. He is a seminal artist and his body of work is timeless; his sense of style beyond influential. David Bowie took risks, he pushed art and life to its fullest and, although he was British, he certainly invaded New York.”

Booth View
Installation View

Lenny explained that the chair was given a ‘Warhol‘ vibe, which then inspired Century to go with a Pop Art  / Deco style for its booth at BDNY. “The lightening bolt on the face was over sized and colored  a deep red and blue, giving it a bit of that Superhero feel. Although the vinyl appears to be distressed, that is a printing effect, making the faux leather appear to have texture.”

Bowie Chair Detail

Aladdin Sane Image Detail

“The additional images used are from the same contact sheets from the original album and promotional photo shoot, but they have been treated graphically to evoke motion. The steel frame of the chair was also fabricated on our Montreal factory and finished in a smoked chrome. This finish and the chair’s unique filigree backing gives it an automotive spirit!”

David Bowie Chair

This David Bowie chair is fit for a Rock Star, but priced at just $2500 (a steal), and Century will produce it on-demand for designers, hospitality, restaurants, etc. “We’re also getting requests from retailers to showcase the chair, based on our launch at BDNY,” Lenny added. Exciting! Visit Century on the web to inquire about the Bowie Chair at This Link!

Eye On Design: Steer Horn Chair By Wenzel Friedrich

Steer Horn Chair
All Photos By Gail

Trained as a cabinet maker, Wenzel Friedrich immigrated to the US in 1853, settling in San Antonio, Texas. In 1880, he realized the potential of the Texas stockyards’ plentiful supply of steer horns for use in the making of furniture. It is likely that Friedrich was inspired by furniture he had seen in Europe, where antlers and other emblems of the hunt were used as décor as early as the 15th century. Friedrich’s horned furniture fulfilled the Victorian fancy for the unusual, as well as symbolizing the Wild West. Heating the horn made the material pliable, allowing Friedrich to create exaggerated curves for his pieces. If you happen to live in San Antonio, you can see examples of his work in the historic Oge House, which is now a Bed & Breakfast.

You can read more about Friedrich Wenzel’s horn furniture designs at This Link.

Steer Horn Chair

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.

Eye On Design: YOMI Inflatable Chair By Mojow

YOMI Chair
All Photos By Gail

Don’t think that I didn’t struggle with the decision of whether or not I should make the awesome YOMI chair a Pink Thing of The Day, because I did. But, ultimatlely, the design aspect won out. Because who doesn’t want to sit on an Inflatable Pink Chair? Plus it comes another colors.

YOMI Chair Front View

I’m a total sucker for inflatable furniture, because it reminds me of the sixties/pop aesthetic that I grew up loving and coveting, but which I was never able to embrace in my own home, because I was a a child and my parents were super square.  Plus, the inflatable home goods of that era were not so sturdy and maybe not as comfortable as they could be. But all that has changed thanks to the smart design approach of Mojow Furniture, makers of the YOMI chair.

YOMI Chair Cushion Detail

Check out the cushion detail above and you can see that the YOMI is compartmentalized so that each section inflates separately and fully, and thus creates a more secure and comfortable sitting experience. And unlike inflatables of the past, the YOMI rests on a sturdy frame.

YOMI Chair Top View

The Mojow YOMI chairs come in super trendy transparent or opaque colors, with a choice of black aluminum or wooden frame. Mojow furniture can be assembled and disassembled in a few minutes, then moved or stored easily. An electric pump is included with each chair. Mojow products are made of UV-treated PVC (thicker than a pool liner) and even have a rating for fire resistance!

YOMI Chair Box

Another cool aspect of the transparent YOMI is that you can personalize it by filling it with any solid objects you like, before inflating the cushions all the way. Feathers, glitter, branded items, little toys — you can totally create your own look! Make this chair a statement piece and design a room around it, or find the color that accents your existing decor.

Features
-Simple and fast assembly and disassembly with an electric pump
-Easy to clean
-Easy transportation and storage
-UV protection
-Manufacturing warranty 1 year

YOMI Chair Rear Side View

Priced at just $465, with Free Shipping available, you can find out more about the YOMI Chair, and order one for yourself, at Mojow USA Dot Com!

YOMI Chair

Eye On Design: Cane Side Chair By Marcel Breuer

Breuer Chair Installation View
Installation View with Eames Shelving Unit (All Photo By Gail)

This side char was the product of a team research project led by Marcel Breuer (19021981), a celebrated architect and émigré known for his tubular metal furniture, and designer of the original Whitney Museum Building on Madison Avenue in NYC. Collaborating with the US Forest Products Laboratory, he applied knowledge accumulated over fifteen years of experimentation, as well as new developments in high-frequency gluing, to plywood construction.

Breuer Chair

The team’s report boasted of the chair’s ability to carry a load of five hundred pounds, and the jury of MoMA’s International Competition for Low-Cost Furniture described the design ad “ingeniously articulated.”

Breuer Cane Chair

Photographed as Part of The Exhibit The Value of Good Design, on Through June 15th, 2019 at The Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Breuer Cane Chair

Eye On Design: Landi Chair By Hans Corey

Landi Chair
All Photos By Gail

The Landi Chair (1938) was among the examples of international design in the exhibition Die Gute Form (Good Form), which the designer Max Bill curated  on behalf of the Swiss Werkbund — an organization established in 1913 to promote good design — and which travelled to venues in Switzerland, Austria, Germany and The Netherlands from 194151.

Landi Chair

Landi Chair was designed by Hans Corey and manufacured from bent and pressed aluminum.

Landi Chair Installation View
Landi Chair Installation View With Kitchen Clock (1953) and Sun Lamp By Max Bill (1951)

Landi Chair

“We’ve tried in this exhibition to dispense as much as possible with ‘appearance’ and focus instead on what is modest, true [and] even good,” Bill wrote in the exhibition catalogue.

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit, The Value of Good Design, on View at The Museum of Modern Art Through June 15th, 2019.

Eye On Design: Inflatable Chair By William H. Miller Jr.

Inflatable Chair
All Photos By Gail

Composed of Vinylite and manufactured by a chemical company (Gallowhur Chemical Corp. of Windsor, VT) this Inflatable Chair (1944) typifies the application of innovative materials and production techniques — heightened during wartime — to domestic products. Designer William H. Miller was an employee of Gallowhur Chemical.

Inflatable Chair

During World War II, Miller collaborated with a cousin of Franklin D. Roosevelt to design a pocket-sized water-desalination device that became standard equipment for Army and Navy Fliers.

Photographed as Part of the Exhibit The Value of Good Design, On View Through June 15th, 2019 at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

Inflatable Chair Installation View
Installation View

Eye On Design: Chippendale Side Chair Circa 1772

Chippendale Side Chair
All Photos By Gail

Around 1748, the young British furniture maker Thomas Chippendale moved from his home in Yorkshire to London, a cosmopolitan city full of opportunity but also stiff competition in the luxury trades. Although there was no guarantee that his business would succeed, within a decade “Chippendale” had become a household name and a hallmark of quality British Furniture.

Chippendale Side Chair Seat Detail
Red Morocco Leather Seat Upholstery, Detail

This classically inspired, fan-shaped chair back with a central medallion draped in garlands is one of the few examples of furniture that can be securely attributed to the workshop of Thomas Chippendale. This Chippendale Side Chair was made as part of a set of fourteen for the politician Daniel Lascelles (17121795) at Goldsborough Hall, Yorkshire.

Chippendale Side Chair

Executed from Mahogany in the neoclassical style, the chair illustrates how Chippendale kept-up-to date-on the latest fashions and tastes of his clients. His workshop created similar sets of neoclassical chairs, including one for Daniel’s brother Edwin at Harewood House, where Chippendale collaborated with the famous architect, Robert Adam (17281792).

Chippendale Side Chair
Chippendale Side Chair, Installation View

Chippendale’s designs spread throughout the British Empire, following the routes of the nation’s expanding maritime trade and colonization of North America and the Caribbean. As talented craftsmen and consumers adopted his design and aesthetic, blending them with their own local traditions, the name Chippendale came to refer not only to a prominent local cabinetmaker but also to an enduring style, one that has played a central role in British and American furniture design for more than 250 years.

Photographed as Part of The Exhibit: Chippendale’s Director: The Designs and Legacy of Furniture Maker at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Verner Panton’s Heart Cone Chair

Heart Cone Chair
All Photos By Gail

In Verner Panton’s Notes on Color, the Danish designer stated:

“In Kindergarten, one learns to love and use colors. Later on, at school and in life, one learns something called taste. For most people, this means limiting their use of colors.”

Heart Cone Chair

The design career of Verner Panton (19261998) reached its first peak toward the end of the 1950s. With a furniture series based on simple geometric shapes, Panton anticipated elements of Pop Art, while also emulating the elegance of Scandinavian Modernism in the execution of the bases.

Heart Cone Chair

The most famous designs from this series are the Cone Chair and the Heart Cone Chair (1959). The Heart Cone Chair takes its name from its heart-shaped silhouette. The extended wings of the backrest are reminiscent of Mickey Mouse ears, but can also be interpreted as a contemporary development of the classic wingback chair.

Heart Cone Chair

Photographed at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

Eye On Design: Nobody’s Perfect Chair By Gaetano Pesce

Nobody's Perfect Chair
Photos By Gail

Gaetano Pesce’s playful Nobody’s Perfect chair (2001) embodies diversity within standardization. Following simple guidelines, the maker pours pigmented resin into a mold to achieve a random quantity and mix of colors. The back of this chair presents an excellent example of the phenomena of Pareidolia, which encouragee you to see an image resembling a face.

Nobody's Perfect Chair

The liquid resin is hardened into the furniture’s components, which are later assembled with pegs.

Nobody's Perfect Chair

The ‘face’ that the back of this chair resembles is quite fun!

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.