Tag Archive | Chair

Eye On Design: Chippendale Side Chair Circa 1772

Chippendale Side Chair
All Photos By Gail

Around 1748, the young British furniture maker Thomas Chippendale moved from his home in Yorkshire to London, a cosmopolitan city full of opportunity but also stiff competition in the luxury trades. Although there was no guarantee that his business would succeed, within a decade “Chippendale” had become a household name and a hallmark of quality British Furniture.

Chippendale Side Chair Seat Detail
Red Morocco Leather Seat Upholstery, Detail

This classically inspired, fan-shaped chair back with a central medallion draped in garlands is one of the few examples of furniture that can be securely attributed to the workshop of Thomas Chippendale. This Chippendale Side Chair was made as part of a set of fourteen for the politician Daniel Lascelles (17121795) at Goldsborough Hall, Yorkshire.

Chippendale Side Chair

Executed from Mahogany in the neoclassical style, the chair illustrates how Chippendale kept-up-to date-on the latest fashions and tastes of his clients. His workshop created similar sets of neoclassical chairs, including one for Daniel’s brother Edwin at Harewood House, where Chippendale collaborated with the famous architect, Robert Adam (17281792).

Chippendale Side Chair
Chippendale Side Chair, Installation View

Chippendale’s designs spread throughout the British Empire, following the routes of the nation’s expanding maritime trade and colonization of North America and the Caribbean. As talented craftsmen and consumers adopted his design and aesthetic, blending them with their own local traditions, the name Chippendale came to refer not only to a prominent local cabinetmaker but also to an enduring style, one that has played a central role in British and American furniture design for more than 250 years.

Photographed as Part of The Exhibit: Chippendale’s Director: The Designs and Legacy of Furniture Maker at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

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Eye On Design: Verner Panton’s Heart Cone Chair

Heart Cone Chair
All Photos By Gail

In Verner Panton’s Notes on Color, the Danish designer stated:

“In Kindergarten, one learns to love and use colors. Later on, at school and in life, one learns something called taste. For most people, this means limiting their use of colors.”

Heart Cone Chair

The design career of Verner Panton (19261998) reached its first peak toward the end of the 1950s. With a furniture series based on simple geometric shapes, Panton anticipated elements of Pop Art, while also emulating the elegance of Scandinavian Modernism in the execution of the bases.

Heart Cone Chair

The most famous designs from this series are the Cone Chair and the Heart Cone Chair (1959). The Heart Cone Chair takes its name from its heart-shaped silhouette. The extended wings of the backrest are reminiscent of Mickey Mouse ears, but can also be interpreted as a contemporary development of the classic wingback chair.

Heart Cone Chair

Photographed at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

Eye On Design: Nobody’s Perfect Chair By Gaetano Pesce

Nobody's Perfect Chair
Photos By Gail

Gaetano Pesce’s playful Nobody’s Perfect chair (2001) embodies diversity within standardization. Following simple guidelines, the maker pours pigmented resin into a mold to achieve a random quantity and mix of colors. The back of this chair presents an excellent example of the phenomena of Pareidolia, which encouragee you to see an image resembling a face.

Nobody's Perfect Chair

The liquid resin is hardened into the furniture’s components, which are later assembled with pegs.

Nobody's Perfect Chair

The ‘face’ that the back of this chair resembles is quite fun!

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Manhattan.

Eye On Design: o432 ‘Acupressure’ Lounge Chair By Jean-Frederic Fesseler

0432 Lounge Chair
All Photos By Gail

Combining visually appealing modern design aesthetics with Ergonomics, the well-tried wooden bead mat is the godfather of the o432 Lounge Chair from furniture designer Jean-Frederic Fesseler. Flexible wooden beads make up the seat and backrest, which have an effect similar to that of acupressure and are meant to relax and stimulate.

0432 Lounge Chair Detail
Wooden Bead Detail

The color combinations of its limited edition series are designed by Ruprecht Dreher, a master student of Joseph Beuys. The o432 Long Chair was also awarded a prestigious international Interior Innovation Award.

0432 Lounge Chairs

Photographed at ICFF 2018 At Javits Center, NYC.

Eye On Design: Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier

Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier
All Photos By Gail

While he is mainly known as a true icon of the fashion world, designer Jean Paul Gaultier has also spent more then two decades invested with furniture manufacturing. In collaboration with French furniture-maker, Roche Bobois, Gaultier has launched his “sexy and bedroom inspired” furniture collection, and the Roman chariot-inspired Ben Hur armchair belongs to this collection.

Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier

The Ben Hur armchair — which looks just like a Modern, Barrel-Design Club Chair when viewed from a straight ahead angle– has an aluminum structure and stylish velvet upholstering that is available in four colors: red (shown here) yellow, blue and green. Like almost every piece from the designer’s collection, this chair has wheels, because Gaultier has made his furniture on the idea of extra mobility. The objective is that people wanting to be able to move each item from one room to another.

Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier Left Front

Also, it’s a lot fun, and will certainly make a bold personal statement about its owner is any room of the home.

Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier

Suggested Retail Price: $6,500 each. Available from Roche Bobois and other fine retailers.

Ben Hur Chair By Jean Paul Gaultier

Photographed at the ICFF 2018 at Javits Center, NYC.

Eye On Design: Exclamation Collection French Art Deco Arm Chair

Exclamation-ized French Art Deco Arm Chair
A Chair Fit For Royalty! (All Photos By Gail)

It took a little bit of hunting but, after a couple of hours on the floor, we found the Oh, Wow! item at this year’s ICFF show at Javits Center: this breathtaking bespoke Art Deco Arm Chair by designer John Landrum Bryant.

John explained to me that by stripping the signed Paris circa 1925 chair that he and his wife had purchased from the Steinitz Gallery in Paris many years ago, he created this one-of-a-kind piece, which belongs in his Exclamation! collection. The first step in the chair’s dramatic transformation was stripping and cleaning its intricate carved wood frame, which was first covered with a vibrant bluish lambskin to preserve every detail, and then a metallic pink finish.

Art Deco Arm Chair Finish Detail Right Front
Upholstery and Finish Details Above and Below
Art Deco Arm Chair Finish Detail Left Front

The chair was partially upholstered from one piece of cowhide, both plain and also embossed with good dots, in an indescribable shade of pink.

Art Deco Arm Chair Finish Detail Right Front

Art Deco Arm Chair Finish Detail Left Side and Back

Art Deco Arm Chair Finish Detail Right Side

With this as the starting point, things really became interesting: lambskin in silver, in green and in pewter, an antique Japanese silk obi, and turquoise python all dance about this incomparable creation.

Dimensions are as follows:

Length: 30″

Width: 30″

Height” 36″

Exclamation-ized French Art Deco Arm Chair

This chair, which is unique and will not be copied, retails for $18,950 ($13,265 to the Trade). For purchase inquires, please visit This Link!

Exclamation-ized French Art Deco Arm Chair

Eye On Design: Current Chair By Vivian Beer

Current Chair By Vivian Beer
All Photos By Gail

The dynamic, curvilinear design of the Current Chair (2004) by Vivian Beer seems to defy the strength and hardness of the steel from which it is made. Historically, few women have worked in metal other than to fashion jewelry, and fewer still have made metal furniture.

Current Chair By Vivian Beer

About her innovative design Beer remarked, “I wanted this chair to seem as if it had been cut and crushed out of a single sheet of metal. At the same time, I wanted it to feel as fast and clean as water its silhouette . . .The balance and the trickery are important.” The chair’s title suggests that the artist’s choice of  the color blue alludes to swiftly moving water.

Current Chair By Vivian Beer

Photographed in the Brooklyn Museum.