Tag Archive | 1967

Modern Art Monday Presents: David Hockney, A Bigger Splash

A Bigger Splash
Photo By Gail

David Hockney’s most famous paintings of Los Angeles, such as A Bigger Splash (1967), depict a commonplace aspect of the city: private swimming pools. This is the final and the largest of three versions on the same theme, all based on an image that the artist found in a book about home pools. Hockney took care to keep the backdrop as flat — almost abstract — as possible, using rollers to apply the acrylic of the azure sky. The splash, in contrast, meticulously rendered with small brushes, took the artist nearly two weeks to finish. “I loved the idea of painting this thing which lasts for two seconds,” he said. “The painting took much longer to make than the splash existed for.” The result is one of the most iconic depictions of a certain upscale California lifestyle; aspirational, and perhaps more Hollywood make-believe than real.

Photographed as Part of the David Hockney Career Retrospective, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC Through February 25th, 2018.

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The Beatles’ “All You Need Is Love” 50th Anniversary Photographs at Morrison Hotel Gallery

All You Need is Love Color
All Photos By Gail

It was 1967 and photographer David Magnus stepped into the ultimate temple of musical genius and creativity known as Abbey Road Studios in London. There, he joined The Beatles and their invited guests, who would all participate in the first world-wide global satellite broadcast performance of a song John Lennon had written called “All You Need Is Love.” Little did David know at the time that he would be the only photographer there.

All You Need is Love Session

The Beatles sang “All You Need Is Love” for a global audience, and Magnus’s beautiful never-before-seen images, now on exhibit (and for sale) at the Morrison Hotel Gallery in SoHo, NYC take you on a journey inside what went on in front of the television cameras and behind the scenes on the day of that their global satellite broadcast, which happened fifty years ago. We attended the show’s opening reception at MHG back in June and had a groovy time. Please enjoy our photos from the show!

John at the Mic
John Lennon at the Mic

Here’s are a few more details of that day 50 years ago:

On June 25, 1967, performers representing 19 countries from around the world appeared on Our World, the first international television production broadcast by satellite.

Mick Jagger and John Lennon
Mick Jagger and John Lennon

An estimated 400 million viewers watched the two-and-a-half hour program, which featured talent including Pablo Picasso and Maria Callas and was closed out by a performance of “All You Need Is Love” by The Beatles.

Paul Triptych
Paul McCartney Triptych

Photographer David Magnus was a friend of and regular collaborator with the band, was on hand to take pictures of the historic gig. The majority of these photos have never been seen before by the public.

George and Patti with Brian
George Harrison and Wife Pattie Boyd with Brian Epstein

George Harrison
George Harrison at the Mic

All You Need is Love Installation View
All You Need is Love Installation View

John and Paul
Paul and John with Ringo in Foreground

John and Paul with Brian
John and Paul with Brian

3 Beatles with Brian
From the Same Series as Above, But Now Including George on the Far Left

Beatles in a Diner
The Beatles Dining in the Studio Commissary

Ringo as Barry Wom

When I look at this photo of Ringo at his drumkit, I just see Barry Wom from The Rutles. Anyone else?

George and Paul
George and John Getting Some Tea

High res images from the All You Need is Love collection can be found at the Morrison Hotel Gallery Website (Click This Link), where you will also find information on how to purchase these fine art prints. The gallery is located at 116 Prince Street, 2nd Floor in SoHo, New York City.

All You Need is Love Studio Session

All You Need is Love Signage
All You Need is Love B&W

Eye On Design: The Tongue Chair

Tongue Chair
Tongue Chair on Display at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum (All Photos By Gail)

With its curvilinear form, the Tongue Chair (1967), designed by Pierre Paulin (1927 – 2009) demonstrates the innovative construction methods and synthetics that allowed Paulin to make highly sculptural upholstered furniture in the 1960s. His forms foretell those of plastic furniture in the latter half of the decade.

Tongue Chair
Tongue Chair Photographed as Part of a Modern Design Display at the Museum of Modern Art

Bob Dylan Dress

 Bob Dylan Dress
Image Source

Model wearing Italian-designed Bob Dylan Trapeze Dress circa 1967.

Bob Dylan Dress at MOMA

Bob Dylan Dress on exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC. Photographed by Gail on July 4th, 2016.

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Happy Birthday, Arthur Lee!

Arthur Lee of Love

Arthur Lee of seminal Sixties psychedelic rock band Love, was born on this day, March 7th, in 1945. Lee passed away from Luekemia on August 3, 2006. If you don’t own a copy of Love’s 1967 album Forever Changes, then you are seriously missing out.

Happy Birthday, Scott Weiland!


Scott and Slash Dance With Mr. Brownstone

Professional Bad Boy of Rock, Scott Weiland, also famous for being the vocalist for Stone Temple Pilots, Velvet Revolver and Stone Temple Pilots, has managed to stay alive long enough to turn another year older, having been born on October 27, 1967. I guess you might know you have a drug problem when you are kicked out of a band that’s made up of former heroin addicts. Happy Birthday, Scott!

Remembering Brian Epstein

On This Date, August 27th, in 1967: The Beatles’ manager Brian Epstein died of a sleeping pill overdose. News of Epstein’s death reached The Beatles while they were on their now infamous retreat with Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. The back story of Brian Epstein’s life while he worked with The Beatles is actually pretty intriguing and crazy and obsessive and all that good stuff. I recommend checking out the book The Love You Make by Beatles’ camp insiders Peter Brown and Steven Gaines for lots of good dirt on Epstein and the whole band. The book gets a bad rap for being such a sordid tell-all, but you know what they say, “they wouldn’t print it if it wasn’t true.”