Tag Archive | Josh Kline

Josh Kline’s Skittles Offers A Selection of Unorthodox Smoothie Drinks For Modern Times!

Josh Kline Skittles
All Photos By Gail

If you think the ‘Green Juice’ smoothie that your coworker gets from the juice truck is disgusting — because it is — wait until you check out some of the ingredients inside the crazy concoctions comprising Josh Kline’s refrigerator-case sculpture, Skittles (2014).

Minimum Wage
Minimum Wage

Fifteen different smoothie flavors line the shelves of Kline’s light box-encased commercial refrigerator. Each bottle lists the unorthodox ingredients contained within, including inedible items such as latex gloves, duct tape, Ritalin and fragments of Google Glass eyewear.

Big Data
Big Data

These high-tech materials, synthetic chemicals, and organic substances evoke specific locations as well as contemporary lifestyles, industries and brands. With varieties like Big Data and Supplements, the indigestible ‘drinks’ inside this glowing cooler clearly illustrate the ways in which our bodies have been engineered, chemically altered, and transformed by technologies of consumption.

Supplements
Supplements

Which ‘Flavor’ is your favorite? Take closer look, below!

Crowd Control
Crowd Control

Clear
Clear

Mixed Greens
Mixed Greens

Designer
Designer

Williamsburg
Williamsburg

Tourism
Tourism

Condo
Condo

Nightlife
Nightlife

Bottle Service
Bottle Service

Anarchy

Anarchy

Anarchy
Plastic 

Sick Day
Sick Day

Josh Kline Skittles

Drink Up!

Cost of Living (Aleyda) By Josh Kline

Cost of Living (Aleyda)
All Photos By Gail

To make Cost of Living (2014) and other works in this series, Josh Kline interviewed workers – janitorial staff and package delivers – and then made casts  of their body parts that they used to complete their daily tasks. In this case, he spoke with the housekeeper named Aleyda,  who worked at the Rivington Hotel.

Cost of Living (Aleyda)

The artist created each element of the sculptural assemblage using a 3-D printer. The results call attention to the laboring bodies of  an often invisible work force, and offer a grim reminder that these workers’ humanity is often valued less than the tools they use to complete their job. Cost of Living (Aleyda) reflects what the artist has described as “the relentless push to squeeze more productivity out of workers – turning  people into reliable, always–on office appliances.”

Cost of Living (Aleyda)

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan.