Tag Archive | 3D Printing

Eye On Design: Scented 3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes
All Photos By Gail

Inside this glass dome are vessels printed from sugar. The dome has an indented opening, inviting museum visitors to take a whiff of the objects inside; and yes, they smelled like Cotton Candy.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

These pieces were designed by architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello in Oakland, California. The team use 3D printing processes to invent forms with unique tactile qualities.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

The two pink candy dishes have rough, grainy surfaces. The first dish resembles a stack of bubbles. At the top, half of one bubble serves as a lid.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

The second is a footed, rimmed bowl with a cone-shaped lid, which sits displayed separate from its base.

Photographed as Part of the Emerging Objects Exhibit at The Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC.

3D Printed Cotton Candy Dishes

Pink Thing of The Day: Happy Tank

Happy Tank Film Still
All Photos By Gail

A few weeks ago, we went over to  The Fashion Institute of Technology to check out the 2017 MFA in Illustration Visual Thesis Exhibition, which was entitled 13 Stories.  It is while visiting the exhibit that I discovered a cool Pink Thing created by FIT student and MFA candidate Necdet Yilmaz, who is a native of Turkey.  Necdet’s visual thesis, Happy Tank, is a story about a little machine built for war that doesn’t want to fight. Happy Tank must be sent to war, but refuses to fire at a large building where a child is seen crying. For disobeying the order, Happy Tank is decommissioned and melted down. The story concludes with Happy Tank being recycled and used to construct a playground years after the war is over.

Happy Tank Film Still

Screen Shots from Happy Tank Animated Film (Above and Below)

Happy Tank Film Still

Necdet explains that this project “is related to my written thesis, War Themed Childrn’s Books and Propaganda. In wars, children are often affected and exploited as a propaganda tool. However, my project is in opposition to what I researched in my thesis. Personally, I am inspired to create these piece because of my background. My home country, Turkey, is located near the Middle East where there is constant war. This instability affects people in the region, like myself, economically, socially and psychologically.

Happy Tank Book

“This body of work is executed in three different mediums: animation, print in the form of a children’s book and toy design. Using pdf software such as SodaPDF for data collection and animation for the first time while I was creating this work was an exciting challenge for me. I learned a lot about myself while discovering the intricacies of unfamiliar technologies. In particular, especially, when I created the animation I learned how designing three-dimensional characters, objects and environments, using different camera angles, lighting and sound in combination enhanced my creative skill.”

Given our political climate today, Happy Tank could be considered more relevant now than ever. You can see more projects by Necdet at his website, located at This Link.

Photographed in the Museum at FIT, Located on Seventh Avenue at 27th Street, as Part of the 13 Stories Exhibit, which is now Closed.

Happy Tank

Eye On Design: 3D Printed Bone Dress By Iris van Herpen

Bone Dress
All Photos By Gail

This dress is 3-D printed, and the 3-D file was developed by designer Iris van Herpen along with architect Isaie Bloch. The file-making took two months of intense drawing and a full week of printing in a very sophisticated machine. According to van Herpen, “People often think that when you create something by machine, it is perfect, but this dress is a good example of the opposite. While the dress was printing, many small ‘faults’ happened because of the intense heating of the material. This makes the bones irregular, and makes it look even more real.”

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art as Part of the Manus X Machina Fashion Exhibit, which has Now Closed.

Bone Dress Installation View

Sebastian Errazuriz’ 12 Shoes for 12 Lovers Inspires Wearable Art by Melissa Shoes

Galeria Melissa
All Photos By Gail

Well-made shoes always look like works of art to me: Like tiny wearable sculptures. It’s probably not entirely unexpected then that others feel similarly — one of those being artist Sebastian Errazuriz. In 2013, Errazuriz debuted his installation, 12 Shoes for 12 Lovers at Miami Art Basel. A collection of twelve shoe-like sculptures inspired by twelve of the artist’s ex-girlfriends, and realized through the use of a 3D printer, these shoes were really quite spectacular, and were featured in a couple of The Gig’s Posts from that time. Because: Shoe Art.

12 Shoes Signage

After Errazuriz gained popularity by creating the best insulated work boots for major Brazilian construction and government companies, his idea of creating wearable shoe art was just too good to lay dormant, Brazilian plastic footwear brand Melissa Shoes has unveiled a special collaboration with Errazuriz in which two of his designs from 12 LoversThe Boss and The Gold Digger, have been reproduced as shoes you can buy in the Melissa stores located around the world. Galeria Melissa in Soho, NYC threw a fun launch party last week and we were lucky enough to snag an invite. Please enjoy our photos from the event!

The Boss Display
The Boss, on Display

The first design to be created as a fully wearable shoe is called The Boss, which is a black stiletto featuring a brass knuckle-like embellishment under the arch of the shoe.

The Boss

The Boss’ prototype was on display at the shop, along with most of the other shoes from the original 12 Shoes for 12 Lovers exhibit. Each shoe is displayed along with the highly stylized backstory of the woman who inspired it.

The Boss In Use
The Boss In Action!

The Boss Pair

The updated Boss design has a more manageable heel, and three instead of for rings.

The Boss Single Shoe

We posted the above photo on FaceBook and it got 100 Likes in ten minutes. You can imagine that these shoes will sell like crazy.

The Gold Digger Art

The second design on sale at Galeria Melissa is based on the Gold Digger (with the heel of the shoe resembling a Golden human form).

The Gold Digger Display

The Gold Digger Single Shoe

The Gold Digger Heel Detail
Boy, You’re Gonna Carry That Weight…

Both The Boss and The Gold Digger sell for $450 per pair and are available to purchase right now, but for a limited time only.

Chandelier

If you haven’t already been there, Galeria Melissa is a gorgeous boutique with this fun Chandelier that has little parrots and other birds hiding in it. Let’s take a closer look.

Chandelier Detail with Birds
Click Image to Enlarge for Detail

Fun!

Sebastian Gets Interviewed

Here is Sebastian being interviewed by a reporter. We did not get to meet him but he seemed very nice and happy to talk about the shoes.

Here are some of the other shoes from 12 Shoes for 12 Lovers:

Honey
Honey

Heart Breaker
The Heart Breaker

Cry Baby
The Cry Baby

Hot Bitch
The Hot Bitch

The Virgin 1
The Virgin

The Virgin
The Virgin, Detail

GI Jane
GI Jane

The Ice Queen
The Ice Queen

Installation View Ice Queen and The Rock
Ice Queen and The Rock, Installation View

It was a fun party and an absolute thrill to be able to see the 12 Shoes for 12 Lovers in person!

Party View

Galeria Melissa is Located at 102 Greene Street (Between Prince and Spring), Soho, New York. Hours are Monday through Saturday from 11:00 AM to 7:00 PM, and Sunday from 12 Noon to 6:00 PM.

Staircase Detail

Cost of Living (Aleyda) By Josh Kline

Cost of Living (Aleyda)
All Photos By Gail

To make Cost of Living (2014) and other works in this series, Josh Kline interviewed workers – janitorial staff and package delivers – and then made casts  of their body parts that they used to complete their daily tasks. In this case, he spoke with the housekeeper named Aleyda,  who worked at the Rivington Hotel.

Cost of Living (Aleyda)

The artist created each element of the sculptural assemblage using a 3-D printer. The results call attention to the laboring bodies of  an often invisible work force, and offer a grim reminder that these workers’ humanity is often valued less than the tools they use to complete their job. Cost of Living (Aleyda) reflects what the artist has described as “the relentless push to squeeze more productivity out of workers – turning  people into reliable, always–on office appliances.”

Cost of Living (Aleyda)

Photographed in the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan.

Pink Thing of The Day: 3D Print Pink Owl

3D Print Pink Owl
Photo By Gail

Over the weekend, I a made pit stop into the 3D Print Show taking place in the Chelsea Gallery District and got a quick but eye-opening crash course in what this phenomenal technology is all about and a sneak peak at the best affordable 3d printers that are about to hit the market. It’s amazing how these objects are made! Anyway, here’s a Pink Owl I took a photo of.

 

Cinderella Table and Attracted to Light Lamp

Cinderella Table and Attracted to Light Lamp
All Photos By Gail

If you have timed tickets to the Bjork Songlines exhibit and need to kill a couple of hours at MOMA while you wait, be sure to visit the third floor Architecture and Design Galleries, many of which have just recently been restaged!

That’s where you’ll find Geoffrey Mann’s Attracted to Light hanging lamp (2005). According to the designer “Attracted to Light narrates the erratic behavior of a moth upon the stimulus of light.” The insect’s path through the air is captured using cinematic technology and materialized through rapid prototyping (also called 3D printing), a process by which computer-controlled lasers solidify liquid or powdered resin layer by layer to create a three-dimensional rendering of a digital design – in this case forming a delicate hanging lamp.

Attracted to Light Lamp
Attracted to Light (Detail)

The design is part oh Mann’s Long Exposure series, which also features lamps based on the trajectories of a bird in flight, taking off, and landing.

Just under the lamp you’ll find the Cinderella Table (2004) by Dutch designer Jeroen Verhoeven for his firm Demakersvan (“The Makers of”). With this table, Demakersvan merged traditional and advanced manufacturing techniques. Using computer software, they translated sketches of the profiles of two tables into digital drawings and then made a rendering representing the two morphing into each other.

Next, using computer-driven woodcutting machines normally employed for mass production, they fabricated the drawing as a three-dimensional object, in thin vertical sections out of sheets of birch. Each slice was glued by hand to the next, forming a unique piece of furniture.
Cinderella Table
Cinderella Table Detail

Cinderella Table

Must See Art: Frank Stella Sculpture at the Marianne Boesky Gallery

Puffed Star II, 2014
Puffed Star II, 2014, Polished Aluminum (All Photo By Gail)

Can you believe that Frank Stella is 78 years old and he is still making amazing sculptures like Puffed Star II? I can’t even believe it — and yet, it is true. Right now, Marianne Boesky Gallery presents Frank Stella Sculpture, the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery since joining in the spring of 2014, and you really have to check it out. Because, Look at this:

K.150, 2014
K.150, 2014

Just Look at it!

K.150, 2014

K.150, 2014

If this were the only piece in the show, it would still be worth going to. K.150, as it is called, was rendered using rapid prototyping or 3D printing. So remarkable.

K.150, 2014

K.150, 2014

If I owned this sculpture, I would never, ever stop looking at it. But wait, there’s more!

Sanibel to Sobolnoye, 2014
Sanibel to Sobolnoye, 2014

This one is pretty cool as well.

Sanibel to Sobolnoye, 2014

Fishkill, 1995
Fishkill, 1995

This one, Fishkill, is from Stella’s Hudson River School series.

Frank Stella Sculpture Sturdy

I think this one is a study for larger work, as you can see a tiny model of the Puffed Star inside of it. Go see this exhibit while you can.

Frank Stella Sculpture will be on Exhibit Through December 20th, 2014 at Marianne Boesky Gallery, Located at 509 West 24th Street, New York, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Frank Stella Sculpture Signage

GI Jane Pumps

GI Jane Shoe
Image Source

These GI Jane Pumps, featuring a tiny Green Army Man on the toe, were designed by artist Sebastian Errazuriz as part of his 12 Shoes for 12 Lovers Exhibit. Because All’s Fair in Love, War and Fashion Footwear. Read more about the exhibit at This Link.