Tag Archive | Katharina Fritsch

Modern Art Monday Presents: Woman With Dog By Katharina Fritsch

Woman With Dog
All Photos By Gail

Katharina Fritsch makes meticulous reproductions of everyday objects, rendering them unfamiliar through extreme shifts in scale and either alluring or repellent color choices. Indeed, saturated and non reflective collators of color lend her sculptures a stones sense of otherworldliness.

Woman With Dog
Installation View

“I always call the starting point  [for a sculpture] a vision,” she has said. “I’ll be in a tram or driving a car and suddenly I get a picture in my mind. Something completely normal turns into a miracle — something I’ve never seen before. Simple things you see every day turn into something strange, something alien.”

Woman With Dog

Woman With Dog (2004) is clearly sealed up — enormously so — from from a small figurine made of seashells, as one might find in a beachside souvenir shop.

Woman With Dog

Photographed in the Art Institute, Chicago.

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A Secret Affair: Selections from the Fuhrman Family Collection at Flag Art Foundation

Yinka Shonbare, Girl Girl Ballerina
Yinka Shonbare MBE, Girl Girl Ballerina (All Photos By Gail)

What an amazing treat it is to have Flag Art Foundation founder Glenn and his wife Amanda Furhman share a selection of sculptures and assorted artworks from their own private collection with fans of their very cool gallery. Geoffrey and I attended the opening reception on Saturday (in the middle of a snow storm!) and were just blown away by an amazing collection that looks like it belongs in a museum. Here are a few of our favorite pieces!

Anish Kapoor, Blood Solid
Anish Kapoor, Blood Solid

This is may be my favorite small scale sculpture by Anish Kapoor The color and quality of the surface is just outstanding.

Felix Gonzales-Torres, Untitled
Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Untitled

You might have seen Elaine Sturtevnat’s reproduction of the work of Gonzalez-Torres at her recent retrospective at MOMA.

Jim Hodges, (First light (Beginning of the End)
Jim Hodges, First light (Beginning of the End)

You can see the Gonzalez-Torres piece reflected in this work by Jim Hodges which is composed of small tiles of mirrored black glass. Very beautiful.

Louis Bourgeois, Topiary
Louis Bourgeois, Topiary

The Fuhrmans must be big fans of Louise Bourgeois, as this was one of three pieces by the late artist included in this show.

Louis Bourgeois, Couple
Louis Bourgeois, Couple

Maurizio Cattelan, Frank and Jamie
Maurizio Cattelan, Frank and Jamie

Imagine having this piece by Maurizio Cattelan in your private collection. How cool would that be?

Matthew Barney, Cremaster 1: Goodyear Lounge
Matthew Barney, Cremaster 1: Goodyear Lounge

I can run pretty hot and cold when it comes to the art of Matthew Barney, but this, I love. See a detail shot below.

Matthew Barney, Cremaster 1: Goodyear Lounge

Look at the art direction on this. Just look at it. Amazing.

Katharina Fritsch, Oktopus
Katharina Fritsch, Oktopus

What a fantastic and fun sculpture by German contemporary artist Katharina Fritsch. I love her work.

Thomas Schutte, Grosser Geist (1)
Thomas Schütte, Grosser Geist (1)

German Sculptor Thomas Schütte has done a series of these large statues called Grosser Geist — which means “Great Spirit” in German — though no two of these works are exactly alike.

Subodh Gupta, Spooning
Subodh Gupta, Spooning

I left the guard’s legs in the shot so you can see how large these spoons are. Another very fun sculpture!

Robert Gober, Untitled
Robert Gober, Untitled

This one looks like a over-sized stick of Butter in a Baby Crib surrounded by Yellow Apples. Everything in the crib is fabricated from Beeswax.

Ron Mueck, Two Women
Ron Mueck, Two Women

Sculptor Ron Mueck creates startlingly lifelike miniature sculptures of people. These ladies stand about 33 inches high and you could swear they are about to talk to you.

Marc Quinn, Sphinx (Fortuna)
Marc Quinn, Sphinx (Fortuna)

British artist Marc Quinn has created dozen of sculptures of supermodel Kate Moss in various contorted poses.

As you can see just from these few photos, this is an enormously exciting exhibit presenting a very rare opportunity to experience a private art collection of such high quality and displaying such exceptional taste. Absolutely do not miss this one!

A Secret Affair: Selections from the Fuhrman Family Collection will be on Exhibit Through May 16th, 2015 at Flag Art Foundation, Located at 545 West 25th Street, 9th and 10th Floors, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Figurengruppe (Group of Figures) By Katharina Fritsch

Group of Figures
All Photos By Gail

From Moma Dot Org:

A brilliant yellow Madonna, a set of skeleton feet, a grey giant leaning obdurately on his club, a green and boyish-looking St. Michael slaying the dragon, a pitch-black snake — these and other figures make up a curious cast of characters currently on view in MoMA’s Sculpture Garden. Figurengruppe (Group of Figures) is a tightly arranged ensemble of nine sculptures by the German contemporary artist Katharina Fritsch, first conceived in 2006–08 in painted polyester and recast in 2010–11 in durable lacquered copper and bronze for outdoor display.

Group of Figures

Katharina Fritsch is an artist best known for fastidiously crafted figures, animals, and everyday objects placed in unexpected arrangements and juxtapositions, uncovering new, sometimes unsettling meanings about our past and present histories. Often painted in striking colors, her work invariably commands attention — and MoMA’s Figurengruppe does not fall short of that. The figures’ polished, silky surfaces, beaming colors, and choreographed arrangement are spellbinding and puzzling, their mute stance and inscrutable veneer tempting us to search for some larger narrative.

There are hints and clues about what inspired certain characters, but ultimately any fixed meaning remains stubbornly elusive. The artist has explained, for example, that the Madonna is based on cheap souvenir figurines sold near church pilgrimage sites in Germany and France, albeit without the lemony dress. Religious symbolism is present, but the dazzling color unhinges the worshipped item from a prescribed context, de-familiarizing her into an object that can bear other potential storylines or associations. (Fritsch also produced the Madonna as a small-scale multiple, creating a more widely available, high-art doppelganger of the commercial souvenir.)

Group of Figures Rear

The skeleton feet go back to a childhood dream in which the artist, as a four-year-old, fled a burning house only to encounter a pair of skeleton feet. These in turn relate to a shoe-fitting practice offered in German shoe stores through the 1960s whereby an image of one’s foot bones would be created using an x-ray contraption. Anecdotal memory plays a part here, but seeing the rigorously crafted set of bones can just as easily bring to mind some disembodied creature out of Edward Gorey’s morbid tales or a commonly encountered object from an archeologist’s lab.

The female torso takes its cue from a 1926 Expressionist sculpture by a man named Ernst Conze that used to stand in the garden of Fritsch’s childhood home in Langenberg, Germany; now painted white and reduced in form, it has been lifted from its past into a present-day setting. In fact, mid-century German parks and public gardens have been a recurring theme in Fritsch’s practice, in some works even serving as visual backdrops. In a way this tactic is preserved in MoMA’s current display—the newly re-installed Sculpture Garden makes for a fitting tableau, situating Figurengruppe within a diverse congregation of cohorts that include Auguste Rodin’s St. John the Baptist Preaching (1878–80), Aristide Maillol’s contemplative female Mediterranean (1902–05), Max Ernst’s King Playing the Queen (1944), and Tom Otterness’s sleeping Head (1988–89), among others.

Taking a look at some of the artist’s source material can offer access points into the group’s oblique presence. What I find most captivating, though, is the friction between the sculptures’ smooth, almost generic look and the rich and quasi-narrative worlds that unfold beneath their surfaces. It’s a space where our intellect or attempt to rely on a logical framework loses its tight grip, conjuring instead images from the realms of history, memory, myths, and fairytales. These aren’t necessarily cheerful, but they do make us ask questions — maybe even reveal some of our own skeletons in the closet.

— Posted by Eleonore Hugendubel, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting of Sculpture

Group of Figures in the Snow

And this is what the Group looks like covered with snow! (Photographed 1/24/16, the day after Superstorm Jonas!)