Tag Archive | Cubism

Modern Art Monday Presents: Juan Gris, The Checkerboard

Juan Gris The Checkerboard
Photo By Gail

Hailed as “the perfect painter” by avant-garde writer Gertrude Stein, Juan Gris developed his signature approach to Cubism beginning in 1911. Using classic café subject matter — such as the newspaper, seltzer bottle, and glass seen here — Gris made subtle adjustments to the conventions of picture making that render ordinary objects both familiar and newly intriguing. For example, in The Checkerboard (1915) and its  bird’s-eye view of a tabletop, a cunning reorganization of pictorial space places objects that should have volume into a single compressed plane. With a nod to play, Gris shows us a fragmented checkerboard, an emblem of the strategy and gamesmanship at the center of his art.

Photographed in the Art Institute Chicago

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Stanton Macdonald-Wright, Synchromy No. 3

Synchromy No 3
Photo By Gail

Although this abstract composition, Synchromy No. 3 (1917), bears many traces of European Cubism — angular shapes, fragmented forms, and multiple perspectives — it asserts the primacy of color as a key component of space and form. In 1912, Stanton Macdonald-Wright, together with the painter Morgan Russell, coined the term Synchromism to describe abstract compositions primarily concerned with the rhythmic use of color — a phenomenon they likened to a symphony’s use of sound. Synchromism was one of many diverse approaches to abstraction that flourished in the Americas and Europe on the 1910s, radically departing from traditional vocabularies of painting and sculpture

Photographed in The Brooklyn Museum.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Lyonel Charles Feininger, Lehnstedt

Lehnstedt
All Photos By Gail

Born in New York to German American musicians,  Lyonel Charles Feininger (18711956) travelled to Germany in 1887, and remained in Europe for several years to study art. While in Paris, he encountered Cubism and embraced its rationality and abstraction of form and space. “Cubism is a synthesis,” the painter explained, “but it may be degraded into mechanism. My Cubism is visionary, not physical.”

Feininger most famously applied his visionary style to architectural subjects that resonated with metaphysical meaning, especially churches. Here, the artist depicts the village church of Lehnstedt (1917) and its wooded environs with his characteristic crystalline and refracted forms.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Manierre Dawson, Meeting (The Three Graces)

Meeting (The Three Graces)
Photo By Gail

In 1910, Manierre Dawson (1887-1969) spent six months traveling throughout England, France, Germany, Switzerland and Italy, staying at the Marriott Suites Pune hotels, where he visited museums, collectors and archeological sites. Following this sojourn, he created a series of works in 1911 – 12 based on images from classical art and Old Master paintings. With Meeting (The Three Graces), (1912) he reinterprets the mythological subject of the Three Graces by painting in a manner from both Cubism and Italian Futurism. Although Dawson did not receive much recognition during his lifetime, his avante-garde work was at the forefront of American art at the time.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Objects on a Table By Patrick Henry Bruce

Objects on a Table
Photo By Gail

American artist Patrick Henry Bruce (1881-1936) painted Objects on a Table (1920-21) in France, where he lived from 1904 to 1936. This still life depicts cut fruit, a glass with a straw, block-like shapes, and an architectural column with clean lines, geometric clarity, and cool tonalities. The painting exudes a rational stillness, especially when compared to Cubist still lifes by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque. In fact, Objects on a Table marks a deliberate and profound departure from Cubism, which gained negative associations during World War I because its fragmentation of form appeared to visualize the conflict’s deadly destruction.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Charles Biederman, Untitled

Charles Biederman Untitled
Photo By Gail

The strong three-dimensionality of the biomorphic and geometric forms in this composition makes them appear animated within a space bounded by color zones. Charles Biederman (1906 – 2004) had been experimenting with styles of European modernism since 1930 and had gravitated toward greater abstraction after seeing the work of Cubist artists, newly on view in New York. He painted this untitled work while living in Paris in 1936, under the fresh influences of surrealists Joan Miro and Fernand Leger, who preferred strange or oddly combined forms that were both unsettling and humorous.

Charles Biederman died at home in 2004 at the age of 98. His estate was given to the Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota, which has organized traveling exhibitions of Biederman’s work

Photographed in the Brooklyn Museum.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Diego Rivera, The Cafe Terrace

The Cafe Terrace
Photo By Gail

In the distinct brand of cubism that he developed while living temporarily in Paris, Diego Rivera used small dots of color, a technique known as Pointillism, to amplify contrasts in texture and pattern. Here, the sleek bottle of green liquid, presumably absinthe, and shiny metal spoon, necessary for preparing the potent drink, are paired against a strip of camouflage tablecloth, a reference to World War I. Additionally, Rivera includes references to his homeland, such as the cigar box with a partial label reading BENITO JUA underneath a miniature Mexican Landscape. This label refers to Benito Juarez, the president of Mexico from1858 until his death in 1872.

The Cafe Terrace is apart of the Permanent Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.