Tag Archives: midcentury

Pink Thing of The Day: Lisi Bed By Ottiu

lisi bed bedroom
All Images Courtesy of Ottiu

The bedroom is the most important room in my home, because sleeping is my jam, and it is the room where I let the decor most specifically reflect my tastes and personality. Is my bed pink? Hell yes, it is; but sadly my bed is not quite as fantastically pink as this bed you see pictured here, which is called the Lisi Bed. I first learned of the Lisi Bed via an email, and when I requested further information on this righteous bed — because I knew I had to feature it — the manufacturer sent me the press release noted below. Read on.

lisi bed on a cloud
Like Sleeping on a Cloud

Virna Lisi started her film career in her early teens in Rome. Though Lisi turned down a role in From Russia with Love, the Hollywood producers were scouting a new Marilyn Monroe, so Lisi debuted in Hollywood comedy movies. Inspired by the Hollywood Golden Era vibes, Ottiu designers conceived the mid-century modern Lisi bed. Structured in walnut wood, its curved headboard is dressed up in a smooth pastel cotton velvet and presents polished brass nails that embellish even more its glamorous design. By featuring the Mid-century Modern Lisi bed, you will have the inviting bedroom you always dreamt about.” They are not kidding.

lisi bed by ottui

It is so beautiful. The Lisi Bed was designed by a group of designers in-house at Ottiu, a luxury furniture brand which is based in Portugal, has a list price of 4.350,00€ (approximately $5,259). Sigh.

Eye On Design: Flag Halyard Armchair By Hans Wegner

hans wegner halyard armchair photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

An iconic and dramatic lounge chair created by Hans Wegner in 1950, the Flag Halyard Armchair has a sculptural and engineered stainless steel frame with a seat and back made of plaited flag halyard. Comfort is added with a longhaired sheepskin throw and an adjustable leather headrest.

flag halyard armchair by hans wegner photo by gail worley

The story goes that Wegner conceived this design while on the beach towards the end of the 1940s. He supposedly modeled the grid-like seat in a sand dune, presumably with some old rope that lay close by (a halyard is a line that hoists or covers a sail).  The chair went into production in the 1950s and its unlikely combination of rope, painted and chrome-plated steel, sheepskin and linen are still unprecedented in furniture manufacture. Wegner’s motivation in using such contrasting materials was apparently not to exploit their textural interplay but more simply to demonstrate his ability to design innovative, practical and comfortable furniture – in any material.

flag halyard armchair by hans wegner photo by gail worley

As Hans Wegner conceived the idea for this chair while at the beach, the wide-set and low frame is naturally perfect for an afternoon rest, especially when matched with the cozy comfort of a sheepskin throw and down feather filled headrest. Reproductions of this chair, perfectly balanced and built with a solid stainless steel frame and 240 meters of textured flag line, create a modern industrial beauty that upholds the iconic style of the original Danish design, and can be found for as little as $1,650. An original will set you back about $14,000.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art on NYC.

Eye On Design: Orange Nesso Table Lamp

orange nesso table lamp photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

In 1964, Italian designer Giancarlo Mattioli, guided by the era’s enthusiasm for space-age forms and materials, experimented with then-newly-available thermoplastic resins. The result was this Nesso Table Lamp, an object represented in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art. Invoking an otherworldly mushroom, the Nesso Lamp’s eye-catching shape provides diffused incandescent light. Produced by Artemide, the lamp is available for purchased from the MoMA Design Store (online only) at This Link.

Eye On Design: Joybird Downloadable Interior Design Coloring Book!

living room coloring book
Color Me Beautiful . . .

Oh man, I can’t even tell you how much I miss being able to go out to see new art, or attend my favorite design shows, such as the Architectural Digest Design Show and ICFF. Maybe you feel as I do, and are looking for new, creative ways to fight lockdown boredom, while also exercising your artistic talent and flair for design. If that is the case, then you will be excited to hear that manufacturers of custom, Mid-century design furniture, Joybird has created a free, downloadable coloring book featuring 8 escape-worthy living spaces for the interior design lover to color as they choose  To start coloring, download the PDFs available at This Link and print them – it’s that easy. Here are a few of the cool room designs included.

bedroom coloring book
The Bedroom

kitchen coloring book
The Kitchen

Joybird would love to see the designs you come up with, so feel free to share your creations on social media with the hashtag #joybirdcolors.

den coloring book
The Den

long chair coloring book
The Study

Eye On Design: Orbital Floor Lamp By Ferruccio Laviani for Foscarini


All Photos By Gail

Every Spring, NYCxDesign runs for two weeks leading up to the ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair), but the Saturday evening prior to the kick off of ICFF is a festive night of open showrooms down in SoHo. Anyone who’s been to Open Showrooms knows that it means one thing; parties, and one of the best parties is hosted by Italian lighting designers Foscarini, which is where I like to start my evening. This year, I was completely smitten by Foscarini’s Orbital Floor Lamp, by architect and designer Ferruccio Laviani. The Orbital lamp pairs mid-century modern shapes with soft illumination to create a playful lamp for bold, contemporary interiors.

Orbital Floor Lamp Installation View

The Orbital Floor Lamp, a 1992 design by Laviani, features five glass shapes with large screw details. The glass shapes are individually backlit. Constructed of polished metal and silk screen-printed glass, the Orbital makes a timeless statement. Shown here in a multicolored lacquered finish, it is also available in white.

Orbital Floor Lamp

The Orbital Floor Lamp has a price point of $2,026.00 and is available online through a variety of outlets, or at any Foscarini Store globally.

Orbital Floor Lamp Detail

Eye On Design: Hang-It-All Clothes Hanger By Charles Eames

Hang It All Clothes Hanger
Photos By Gail

Designing couple Charles and Ray Eames’s interest in design for children extended to many different kinds of playroom objects, including this hanging rack made from colorful wooden balls. The Hang-It-All Clothes Hanger (1953) remains in production to this day, and you can find an inexpensive version at any Flying Tiger Shop.

Photographed as Part of The Value of Good Design, on Exhibit Through June 15th, 2019 at The Museum of Modern Art in NYC

Hang It All Clothes Hanger
Installation View

Eye On Design: Book Covers By Elaine Lustig Cohen

Trio of Book Covers
All Photos By Gail

Over six decades, Elaine Lustig Cohen (19272016) moved among diverse activities, including art, design, and rare-book dealing. She began her career as a graphic designer in the mid-1950s, extending the vocabulary of European Modernism — Constructivism, Dada, and the Bauhaus —  into an American context for publishers, architects and cultural Institutions.

From 1962 to 1967, she helped shape the Jewish Museum’s intuitional identity, directing the design of catalogues, posters, booklets and other printed material for its progressive exhibition program. At the same time, Lustig Cohen developed a hard-edge style as a painter, with a formal language of solid colors, abstract geometric shapes, and minimally visible brushstrokes, her paintings directly relate to her design work and to the movement called Postpainterly Abstraction. Lustig Cohen’s artistic contributions demonstrate that the lineage of Postpainterly Abstraction should been expanded beyond the fine arts to include postwar graphic design.

Three Book Covers

One of Lustig Cohen’s key projects was the design of book jackets for Meridian Publishers. Drawing on her knowledge modern typography and avant-garde design principles, such as asymmetrical composition dramatic scale, and image montage, Lustig Cohen forged a distinctive graphic voice.

Three Book Jackets

For book jackets, she described her process as one of distillation, in which she would identify the central ideas of the text and render then abstractly with bold lettering, expressive forms, and playfully collaged photographic elements.

Photographed in the Jewish Museum in Manhattan.