Tag Archive | vintage

Pink Thing Of The Day: Pink Primo Ride-On Push Scooter

pink primo ride on push scooter photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Here at The ‘Gig, were are all about Sweet Rides for Kids. Example: check out this Pink Primo Ride On Push Scooter, which is its full actual name. How cool is thing thing? Could you just die? I am dead already.

pink primo ride on push scooter photo by gail worley

The scooter also comes in sunny, lemon yellow and pistachio green, but who gives a shit.  Pink is always our color choice. Designed by Elisha Ruesch in 2019, this powder-coated iron scooter is patterned after a vintage Italian model and will give the recipient their first taste of a classic. Like a high-quality car, the Primo Ride-On Push Scooter is crafted from sheets of solid metal, and welded by hand from a minimum of pieces.

pink primo ride on push scooter photo by gail worley

The Primo Ride-On Push Scooter is for kids over age one, who are also under 45 pounds. Available from the MoMa Design Store in Soho for just $199. Simple assembly required.

pink primo ride on push scooter photo by gail worley

Eye On Design: Lucite Box Handbag By Wilardy Originals

lucite box handbag photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

In mid-century America, molded Box Handbags like this one (circa 1955) were fabricated by the New York City accessory firm Wilardy aka Wilardy Originals, which embraced the increasingly experimental postwar design trend towards ‘scientific’ materials such as Lucite.

lucite box handbag photo by gail worley

Wilardy Originals began in 1946 as Handbag Specialties, a collaboration between father and son team, Charles William Hardy and William Hammond Hardy. The original offices and factory were in New York, and moved to Union City, New Jersey in 1953. Charles, who was called Bill, was a wizard with mathematics and a serious business man. William, known as Will, was the artist, designer, a great motivator and a man who possessed unusual social grace. Will Hardy took over the business in the 1960s, and continued designing and manufacturing into the early 1980s.

wilardy lucite box handbag photo by gail worley

In addition to lucite handbags, Will designed lighting fixtures for Dinico, lucite bathroom fixtures, elegant containers for Atlantic Can, a chest of drawers for Jacqueline Kennedy, chandeliers for the White House, jewelry, tableware for the Grainware Company, and even clothing. He passed away on May 24th, 2018. Find out more about Wilardy Originals at This Link!

Photographed in the Museum of the City of New York in Manhattan.

The Beatles Faces Recreated in Typewritten Lyrics

The Beatles By David Hollier Photo By Gail Worley
All Photos By Gail

The likenesses of all four members of The Beatles — from left to right: Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr — were created by artist David Hollier on these vintage Royal typewriters.

Paul McCartney Typewriter Photo By Gail

Paul’s face is made up of the lyrics from the songs “I’ve Just Seen a Face” and “I Saw Her Standing There.”

John Lennon Typewriter Photo By Gail

John’s facial features were formed from the lyrics of the songs “A Hard Day’s Night” and “Please, Please Me.”

George Harrison Typewriter Photo By Gail

On the face of George (my favorite Beatle) you can read the lyrics from two songs he penned, “I Need You” and “You Like Me Too Much.”

Ringo Starr Typewriter Photo By Gail

Ringo sang lead on the songs “Boys” and “I Wanna Be Your Man,” so it makes sense that Hollier would have used these songs to recreate his unique visage.

I wish I had been able to get a close up shot of some of the lyrics, but the plexiglass vitrine protecting this artwork from curious hands at the Scope Art Fare also created a pretty gnarly glare. This piece is priced at $10,500 for all four typewriters and the pages wrapped around their rollers! David Hollier is represented by New Apostle Gallery located in Brooklyn, New York.

 

Pink Thing of The Day: Retro Cocktail Tray With Pink Elephants

Vintage Cocktail Tray By Gail Worley
Photo By Gail

This vintage metal cocktail tray is absolute perfection and a dream to own for any fan of mid-century modern design! Embellished with a design of assorted Pink Cocktail Glasses and a boarder of prancing Pink Elephants, this 5 x 7-inch tray, officially known as  a “tip tray,” was originally sold in sets of four. Currently, lucky collectors can find them in stores that specialize in vintage pop culture collectibles, and on eBay and other auction sites.

Eye On Design: Sea Beauties Vintage Wallpaper

Sea Beauties Wall Paper
All Photos By Gail

Designs inspired by nature form the largest group of more than 10,000 wallpapers in the collection of the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum. Often, a wallpaper theme would tie-in with the room’s use: designs of food were popular for dining rooms and water motifs dominated in bathrooms. The modern bathroom. with a designated space indoors, running water and flush toilets, had been developed by the late nineteenth century.  Given the concerns for hygiene and running water, ceramic tiles were the preferred wall-covering because of their durability and sanitary nature. For those on a budget, early wallpapers imitated this look with varnished tile patterns.

Sea Beauties Wall Paper

Around 1910, bathrooms shifted away from this sterile, hygienic look to become a more pleasant, decorative room that was harmonious with the home’s decor. Some moisture-resistant coverings were introduced in the early 1900‘s, but general-use wallpapers at this time were printed with water-soluble pigments and thus were unsuitable for use in bathrooms.

Panel 2

By 1934, the development of washable wallpapers coincided with a new array of decorative papers that had no hint of their sanitary past; rather, scenic designs featuring more panoramic views, as seen here, became popular, appealing to decorators and homeowners who wanted to bring the outdoors inside.

Panels 1 and 2

Sea Beauties Scenic Wallpaper (1920 – 35, Ideal Wall Decoration) seen here in this three-panel set, contains a lively underwater view of fish, shells, coral and plant life in their natural habitat. Multiple sets could be used to wrap around the bathroom, creating an immersive environment.

Panel 3

This early water-resistant design is printed in oil colors, so it could withstand the moisture and occasional splash from the tub, giving the wallpaper both a practical and decorative purpose.

Photographed in the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in Upper Manhattan.

Sea Beauties Wall Paper

Eye On Design: Moschino Vintage Steam Iron-Shaped Handbag

Moschino Steam Iron Handbag
Photos By Gail

It has been said that an ‘it bag’ is only an ‘it bag’ if you’re unlikely to ever own one. Characterised by exclusivity, celebrity and exorbitant price tags, ‘it bags’ were first introduced in the mid 1980s, and by the early 1990s small bags emblazoned with corporate designer logos were the accessories in fashion-conscious circles. Glossy advertising campaigns, glamorous brand ambassadors and celebrity style icons, including Lady Diana, encouraged power-dressing executives with high disposable incomes to snap up these luxury wares.

In critique of this phenomenon, Italian designer Franco Moschino produced a series of handbags that parodied the trend for conspicuous consumption. Among them were witty works such as the Steam Iron Handbag (Ferro da Stiro), using white lacquered and metallic silvered leather.  Marrying humour and irreverence, Moschino’s surreal visual puns satirised the fashion industry, couture conventions and consumerism. Yet they also drew attention to the social politics of the period, critiquing the stereotypical female clotheshorse and articulating the less glamorous reality that, despite their careers, women remain enslaved to the domestic realm in ways that men do not.  Combining luxury with eccentricity, this handbag is an extraordinary example of Moschino’s wit and talent.

Moschino Steam Iron Handbag

Photographed as part of The Exhibit Camp: Notes on Fashion, on View Through September 8th, 2019 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Retro Rotary Dial Desk Telephone

Pink Rotary Dial Telephone
All Photos By Gail

Do you recognize this object? Do you know how works? How old are you? Don’t answer that. It’s hard to believe that this totally rad Pink Rotary Dial Desk Telephone was once the height of cool and contemporary consumer design. Now, it’s just a sculpture, or a piece pop culture ephemera.

Pink Phone with Pink Mirror

Maybe you’ve seen one used as a prop in an old movie you enjoy for its nostalgic pull.

Pink Rotary Dial Telephone

It is beautiful though, ins’t it? Sure it is.

Photographed at ICFF at Javits Center, NYC, in May of 2018

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Rubber House on an Exercise Bike

Trimcycle By Battle Creek
All Photos By Gail

Trimcycle By Battle Creek is the name of this sculpture, which is comprised of a Pink Silicone Rubber House draped over a vintage Exercise Bicycle. It is part of the exhibit Bent, by artist Brian Tolle, from his group series known collectively as Levittown.

Trimcycle By Battle Creek

Here’s a bit more about the series from C24 Gallery:

A keen observer of domestic life and identity, Brian Tolle furthers his interest of politics of place in his Levittown sculptures. The sculptures are inspired by the planned housing community, Levittown: the historic town in Long Island, NY, which became the archetype of American suburban life in the early 1950s. Each of Tolle’s eleven sculptures is a precise scaled model of an original Levittown home — cast from the same mold, varying only in color and displaying the architectural details of the original structures.

Trimcycle By Battle Creek

The sculptural houses themselves resemble deflated or melting membranes, and are supported by various appropriated mementos of suburban life – found toys, tire swing, shopping cart, a plastic nativity set, and a recliner. These iconographic items rest underneath and inside silicone rubber skins of the houses, emphasizing a dialogue between sites and domestic artifacts. As the title of the exhibition suggests, the artworks presented in Bent provoke a re-reading, or discord between reality and fiction. The formal play that Tolle visually articulates between shapes and textures, private and public spaces presents a challenge to standard architectural, as well as behavioral conventions and norms.

Photographed at the C24 Gallery in Manhattan.

Flight/Equip.: United Airlines 3480 E7W

Devil’s Music Sing-Along T-Shirt

Devils Music Singalong

Oh, man, this sure does inspire sweet nostalgia for the happy days of the Record Listening Party! Why not sing along to 25 of your favorite horrendously inappropriate songs while rocking this awesome T-shirt design by Steven Rhodes! Devil’s Music Sing-Along T-Shirt is on sale now for just $21.95 at This Link!

Eye On Design: Hullabaloo Mondrian-Inspired Hi Brows Boots

Hullabaloo Mondrian Inspired Hi Brow Boots
All Photos By Gail

These extremely rare, retro-vintage Hi Brows Boots were worn by one of the GoGo dancers on the 60s-era TV show, Hullabaloo. Made of white vinyl with red and blue vinyl panels and black vinyl piping, the red and blue color block design was inspired by the non-representational paintings of Dutch artist, Piet Mondrian. They are low heeled and below the calf in height, with a back metal zipper at the back. Why these boots originally sold for just a few dollars per pair, they can now fetch as much as $700 or $800 on eBay.

Hullabaloo Mondrian Inspired Hi Brow Boots

Hullabaloo was a Pop Rock weekly variety show that ran from 1965 to 1966 (two seasons), NS was broadcast on the NBC network. As with ABC TVs Shindig, which began 4 months earlier, this series combined the musical trends of the day, The British Invasion, Detroit’s Motown sound and the merging Folk Rock trend. Unlike Shindig, this series featured a segment from Great Britain hosted by The Beatles‘ manager Brian Epstein, who presented “up and coming” groups. The weekly hosts, at NBC ‘s Burbank studio, included George Hamilton, Roger Smith, Noel Harrison, Paul Anka and Sammy Davis Jr.

Hullabaloo Mondrian Inspired Hi Brow Boots

The performers, from both sides of the Atlantic, included The Four Seasons, The Beatles, Nancy Sinatra, Gary Lewis and The Playboys, Petula Clark, Barry McGuire, The Kinks, Herman’s Hermits, The Byrds and The Lovin’ Spoonful.

Photographed in the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, Queens, NY.