Tag Archive | Vintage

Eye On Design: Hullabaloo Mondrian-Inspired Hi Brows Boots

Hullabaloo Mondrian Inspired Hi Brow Boots
All Photos By Gail

These extremely rare, retro-vintage Hi Brows Boots were worn by one of the GoGo dancers on the 60s-era TV show, Hullabaloo. Made of white vinyl with red and blue vinyl panels and black vinyl piping, the red and blue color block design was inspired by the non-representational paintings of Dutch artist, Piet Mondrian. They are low heeled and below the calf in height, with a back metal zipper at the back. Why these boots originally sold for just a few dollars per pair, they can now fetch as much as $700 or $800 on eBay.

Hullabaloo Mondrian Inspired Hi Brow Boots

Hullabaloo was a Pop Rock weekly variety show that ran from 1965 to 1966 (two seasons), NS was broadcast on the NBC network. As with ABC TVs Shindig, which began 4 months earlier, this series combined the musical trends of the day, The British Invasion, Detroit’s Motown sound and the merging Folk Rock trend. Unlike Shindig, this series featured a segment from Great Britain hosted by The Beatles‘ manager Brian Epstein, who presented “up and coming” groups. The weekly hosts, at NBC ‘s Burbank studio, included George Hamilton, Roger Smith, Noel Harrison, Paul Anka and Sammy Davis Jr.

Hullabaloo Mondrian Inspired Hi Brow Boots

The performers, from both sides of the Atlantic, included The Four Seasons, The Beatles, Nancy Sinatra, Gary Lewis and The Playboys, Petula Clark, Barry McGuire, The Kinks, Herman’s Hermits, The Byrds and The Lovin’ Spoonful.

Photographed in the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, Queens, NY.

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Eye On Design: GE Color Television Set, Model 21C134 (Circa 1960)

GE Color Television 21C134 1960

The unusual detail in this set, the GE Model 21C134 (1960) shows how television manufacturers tried to differentiate their products while selling essentially the same thing. The controls have been moved to the top, while the oversize wheels and large handle make the set easy to move. The color scheme suggests that the set was intended for an informal basement or “rumpus room” setting.

GE Color Television 21C134 1960

Photographed in the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria Queens, NY.

Pink Thing of The Day: Vintage Pink Mermaid Soap Dish

Pink Mermaid Soap Dish
Photo By Gail

This little gal was spotted in the vanity area of the bathroom in one of houses owned by my sister and her husband. As you can see, this fine soap dish is “too nice” to actually be used to hold the soap.

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Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Flamingo Vintage Cocktail Stirrers!

Pink Flamingo Vintage Cocktail Stirrers
All Photos By Gail

These are amazing, aren’t they? Any cocktail would just taste better with a Pink Flamingo extending delicately from the glass. I spotted these out in San Marino, California, at Simply Fresh; a terrific store for finding fun stuff like this.

Pink Flamingo Vintage Cocktail Stirrers Detail

Ram Hood Ornament on 1950’s-era Dodge

Ran Hood Ornament
All Photos By Gail

I see this classic Dodge parked on the street across from my house most days. I’m not sure which model year it is, but I think mid-to-late 1950s is a safe best. Anyway, I noticed it has this cool Ram Hood Ornament. Very nice.

1950s Dodge

Check it out: what model year does this look like to you? Leave suggestions in the comments, please!

Here are a couple more shots!

1952 Dodge Wayfarer

1952 Dodge Wayfarer

Ram Hood Ornament
Ramming Speed!

Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861 – 2008 at The Brooklyn Museum

Cyclops Head
Cyclops Head from Spook-A-Rama (1955), All Photos By Gail

Two of my most-memorable adventures of the summer of 2015 were a Saturday afternoon, and a Friday evening, that I spent having various types of crazy fun at Coney Island, Brooklyn — which is truly a magical place where there are endless wonders just waiting to be discovered. I just love it there. If you are also fan of Coney Island, then I hope you had the chance to see Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861 – 2008, which, sadly, just closed at the Brooklyn Museum this past weekend. Geoffrey made it out there just in time!

Funny Face of the Steeplechase
The Funny Face of the Steeplechase: An Enduring Symbol of Coney Island

This exhibit was an unexpected delight; overflowing with vintage carnival ride and game props, photography spanning over 100 years, and artworks of every kind that were inspired by the vibe of Coney Island. Please enjoy a selection of my photos!

Mae West and Jimmy Durante Circa 1910
Ad Featuring Mae West and Jimmy Durante, Circa 1910

Fortune Teller Jones Walk
Fortune Teller, Jones Walk, Coney Island (2008) By Frederick Brosen

Greetings From Coney Island
Greetings From Coney Island By Red Grooms, 2007

Vintage Game Props
Vintage Game Props

Quito Human Octopus
Quito The Human Octopus, Original Side Show Banner

Tunnel of Love
Tunnel of Love (1947) By Henry Koerner

Carousel Animals By Charles Looff
Carousel Animals By Charles Carmel

Carousels were being carved in England and Germany before they became popular in America. In 1907, the inventor William F. Mangels, who immigrated to New York from Germany, patented the overhead gears that controlled the galloping motion of the carousel horse. His design became standard in the field. Mangels collaborated with Coney Island’s best wood carvers, many of whom were also immigrants. Between 1880 and 1920, Coney Island produced a distinctive style of carved carousel animals characterized by flamboyant decorations and expressive faces. They were the product of Danish-born Charles I.D. Looff and the wood carvers he inspired, including Solomon Stein, Harry Goldstein, and Charles Carmel, whose horses are show in the photo above. Stein, Goldstein and Carmel were Eastern European Jewish wood-carvers who had fled anti-Semitism. They brought to America a tradition of carving symbolic animal imagery for synagogues, and found an outlet for their talent in the American carousel industry.

Arabian Camel Stander
Arabian Camel Stander By Charles I.D. Looff, Circa 1895

The bald eagle on this ride’s saddle (see detail, below) trumpets Coney Island as a symbol of American patriotism, while the Camel’s Arabian origin and tasseled breastplate evoke the Middle East, in keeping with the various parks’ exotic architecture.  Charles I.D. Looff built the first hand-carved carousel at Coney Island in 1876, just six years after he emigrated from Denmark.

Eagle Seat Detail

Parachute Drop Photo
Parachute Drop, Photo

Gambling Wheel
Gambling Wheel, 1900-1920

Six silver dragons form the spokes of this electrified gambling wheel. Their snakelike forms resemble Chinese dragons, legendary creatures that are historically associated with the emperor’s imperial power. As symbols of prosperity and good luck, dragons appealed to the diverse visitors who came to Coney Island.

The Barkers Booth
The Barker’s Booth By Henry Koerner, 1948-49

In this painting, the distorting mirrors that clad the barker’s booth turn normal spectators into freaks, commenting on notions of perception and difference.

Coney Island New York 1976
Coney Island New York, 1976, By Leon Levinstein

Coney Island Teenagers 1949
Coney Island Teenagers, 1949, by Harold Feinstein

Anomie 1991 Winged Victory
Anomie 1991: Winged Victory By Arnold Mesches

Coney Island 1948

Coney Island, 1948 By George Tooker

Even if you did not get the chance to see this exhibit for yourself, I hope that all of my photos will be getting you inspired and exited to head out to Coney Island for your own adventures once the summer kicks off in just a few months!

Coney Island Quote

Coney Island Visions of an American Dreamland Signage

Yes, It Exists: Fred Flintstone Bowling Pins

Fred Flintstone Bowling Pins
Photo By Gail

In 1965, the Arco toy company (later acquired by Mattel) manufactured a Flintstones Bowling Game with pins molded in the likeness of Fred Flintstone. Fred sure did love to bowl.

Photographed in the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens.