Tag Archive | Acrylic

Eye On Design: Cabinet De Curiosité By Shiro Kuramata

Cabinet De Curiosite 2
All Photos By Gail

Shiro Kuramata (1934 – 1991) a member of The Memphis Group and among the most innovative designers of the late twentieth century, was fascinated by the visual possibilities of acrylic. The artist stated that his ideal objective was to see objects floating in air. Named for the Wunderkammern owned by Renaissance princes that displayed natural and man-made curiosities, Cabinet De Curiosité (1988) offers the magical impression of suspending its contents in midair. Kuramata explored the phenomenological effects of acrylic — light and lightness, invisibility and reflectivity, weight and weightlessness – and the material has become the poetic signature of his work. Kuramata used the term Neiro, or “sound-color,” to describe the synesthetic effect that acrylic has it both its physical presence and the spectral color-shadows it casts as light passes through it. Its prismatic luminosity changes with light and viewpoint, exploiting the optical effects of the material. Shown here alongside Flower Vase #3 (1989).

Photographed in the Met Breuer in NYC.

Rainbow Tumblers at the MOMA Design Store

Rainbow Tumblers
All Photos By Gail

Holy cow! How rad are these Rainbow Hued Tumblers from the MOMA Design Store? Answer: So Rad. I know you’re probably thinking that it would be too risky to buy these, because drinking glasses — especially fancy drinking glasses — break so darn easily. But while these tumblers look like glass, they are made of durable acrylic! Their teardrop-shaped interior has a rainbow effect that radiates from the base throughout the tumbler.

Available for just $10 each in the store or a set of 4 for $40 ($6.95 shipping) online at This Link!

Rainbow Top View