Tag Archive | Writer

Moholy-Nagy: Future Present at the Guggenheim NY

Moholy-Nagy Three Globes
All Photos By Gail. All Text By The Guggenheim Museum

László Moholy-Nagy (b. 1895, Borsód, Austria-Hungary; d. 1946, Chicago) believed in the potential of art as a vehicle for social transformation, working hand in hand with technology for the betterment of humanity. A restless innovator, Moholy-Nagy experimented with a wide variety of mediums, moving fluidly between the fine and applied arts in pursuit of his quest to illuminate the interrelatedness of life, art, and technology. An artist, educator, and writer who defied categorization, he expressed his theories in numerous influential writings that continue to inspire artists and designers today.

Moholy-Nagy 4 Pictures

Moholy-Nagy Plastic Form

Walter Gropius invited him to join the faculty at the Bauhaus school of art and design, where Moholy-Nagy taught in Weimar and Dessau in the 1920s. In 1937, he was appointed to head the New Bauhaus in Chicago; he later opened his own School of Design there (subsequently renamed the Institute of Design), which today is part of the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Moholy-Nagy

Moholy-NagyAmong Moholy-Nagy’s radical innovations were his experiments with camera-less photographs (which he dubbed photograms); his unconventional use of industrial materials in painting and sculpture; experiments with light, transparency, space, and motion across mediums; and his work at the forefront of abstraction, as he strove to reshape the role of the artist in the modern world. Moholy-Nagy: Future Present features paintings, sculptures, collages, drawings, prints, films, photograms, photographs, photomontages, projections, documentation, and examples of graphic, advertising, and stage design drawn from public and private collections across Europe and the United States.

Manifesto

Room of The Present

On display in the museum’s High Gallery is Room of the Present (Raum der Gegenwart), a contemporary fabrication of an exhibition space conceived of by Moholy-Nagy in 1930, but not realized in his lifetime.

Room of The Present

Light Prop for an Electric Stage
Light Prop for an Electric Stage

On view for the first time in the United States, the large-scale work contains photographic reproductions and design replicas as well as his kinetic Light Prop for an Electric Stage (Lichtrequisit einer elektrischen Bühne, 1930; recreated 2006). Room of the Present illustrates Moholy-Nagy’s belief in the power of images and the significance of the various means with which to view and disseminate them — a highly relevant paradigm in today’s constantly shifting and evolving technological world.

Room of The Present

Interior Elevation

This is a massive retrospective with lots to see and learn about the genius of László Moholy-Nagy. Here are a few more photos from this must-see show!

Three Pictures Black Backgrounds

Two Pictures

Ad From London Underground
Ad For The London Underground Circa 1936 – 37

Moholy-Nagy

Moholy-Nagy Pins Detail
Detail from Above Work

Moholy-Nagy

László Moholy-Nagy is a central figure in the history of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. In 1929, Solomon R. Guggenheim and his advisor, German-born artist Hilla Rebay, began collecting his paintings, works on paper, and sculpture in depth for the Guggenheim’s growing collection of nonobjective art. His work held a special place at the Museum of Non-Objective Painting — the forerunner of the Guggenheim Museum — where a memorial exhibition was presented shortly after his untimely death in 1946.

Moholy-Nagy

Moholy-Nagy: Future Present Runs Through September 7th, 2016 at the Guggenheim Museum, Located at 1071 Fifth Ave at 89th Street, NYC.

Moholy Nagy Gift Shop

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RIP Comedian Tom Davis

Al Franken and Tom Davis 1978
Al Franken & Tom Davis in 1978 (Image Source)
I was at sea last Thursday (July 19th, 2012) when comedian and writer Tom Davis passed away from cancer, so I am just getting around to posting about this now. Davis was one of the first writers for Saturday Night Live and half of the comedic duo Franken and Davis, with partner Al Franken (now a Democratic Senator from Minnesota). Along with Franken, Davis was responsible for creating enduring SNL characters such as alien family The Coneheads and Irwin Mainway, whose toy company marketed the Halloween costume “Invisible Pedestrian” (an all black suit of clothes) under the disclaimer “Not for Blind Kids.” Davis also wrote the hilarious skit where Julia Child (Dan Aykroyd, in a spot on performance) accidentally cuts herself and bleeds to death on Live TV after discovering that the phone installed on the set kitchen is just a prop. Tom Davis was 59 years old.

RIP Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury 1966
Ray Bradbury in 1966 (Image Source)

Genre defining Science Fiction/Horror writer, Ray Bradbury, has passed away on Tuesday, June 5th, 2012 at the age of 91. I read so many of Bradbury’s novels and short stories as a kid I can’t even name them all. But one of his short stories, “All Summer in a Day” was just so simply devastating in its impact, I doubt I could ever forget it. Now I want to re-read everything again. His work is amazing. There’s a very sweet remembrance/obit on Bradbury over at Indiewire.com that’s my favorite of those I’ve read so far today, if you want to check it out. RIP Ray, you changed modern literature so much and influenced generations.

The Last Mortician: Creepy and Compelling!

Writer Tim Hall and Cartoonist/Illustrator Dean Haspiel have collaborated on an intriguing short story — told in the form of a graphic novel — entitled The Last Mortician, which has been published at Tor Dot Com. The dystopian vision of this brief but powerful tale focuses on a time in the future when mankind has opted to trade the ability to procreate for the questionable “gift” of eternal life. I loved the story and the illustrations, and just wish it had been longer. Maybe Tim and Dean will turn it into a movie script?!

Both Tim and Dean have strong ties to The Worley Gig: Tim having originally named The ‘Gig way back when it was just a syndicated print column in a little NYC free alternatively monthly called The NY Hangover. Dean, whose work has earned him an Emmy, designed (in my likeness) the Worley Gig avatar you see on the website’s header! Do visit Tor.com to read The Last Mortician, when you have a few minutes to spare. It is a fairly quick read and very much worth the click!

Vincent Cecolini, Head Writer, VH1 Classic

Former Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic has complained that there are more working music journalists that there are working musicians. Although I’m a music journalist, I have to admit that the fucker is right. These days, it’s hard for even talented writers to stand out, but Gail Worley has done just that and so much more. What is the special something, the magic, the gift that sets Gail apart? Just ask Ministry’s Al Jourgensen, former Alice Cooper drummer Neal Smith, former Screaming Trees drummer Barrett Martin or any of the thousands of the artists that Gail has interviewed (or rather, who have “encountered” Gail), many of whom have now become friendly with our fearless scribe. But here’s the thing: each of these artists will give you a different answer! That Gail evokes so many different responses is exactly her charm. Not only is Gail a gifted writer, but I have never met a journalist as passionate about music as she is. A dying breed, Gail Worley is a treasure.