Tag Archives: glass

Eye On Design: Steuben Glass Vase By Frederick Carder

steuben glass vase photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

This striking, six-pronged Green Glass Vase (circa 1931) is part of a small group of modernist art glass by Frederick Carder for the Steuben Division of Corning Glass Works. Carder was a glass blower, born and trained in England. He preferred traditional forms and elaborate ornament, but like many of his contemporaries active in the late 1920s, he responded to the international interest in abstraction and avant-garde experimentation by incorporating sharp angles, asymmetry, and bright color combinations into some of his designs.

steuben glass vase photo by gail worley
Installation View

Photographed in the Art Institute, Chicago.

Eye On Design: Glass Flower Necklace By House of Chanel

Chanel Glass Flower Necklace By Gail Worley
Photo By Gail

One of the enduring legacies of Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel was her elevation of costume jewelry to high fashion. Maison Gripoix, a house that has serviced the couture industry since its founding in 1869, was among her earliest and most frequent collaborators. The company’s specialized pate de verre (glass paste) technique was developed by the founder, Augustine Gripoix, and passed down generationally. Instead of the kiln method employed by other manufacturers, the house pours molten glass directly into the sophisticated metal settings that frame its designs. This meticulous an costly process allows for greater freedom of coloration and form, and lends a subtle effervescence to the floating glass components. This wreath of graduated translucent flower heads (circa 1938) was produced by Gripoix for Chanel and reflects the late 1930s vogue for romantic nature-based motifs.

Photographed as part of the exhibit In Pursuit of Fashion: The Sandy Schreier Collection, on view through May 17th, 2020 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Eye On Design: Cast Glass Chairs By Marc Newson

Marc Newson Glass Chairs
All Photos By Gail

From the outset of his singular career, designer Marc Newson has pursued parallel activities in limited and mass production of functional design objects. Revisiting his roots as a jeweler and silversmith in an exhibition at Gagosian Gallery in Chelsea, Newson explores increasingly rare decorative techniques at an unconventionally large, even unprecedented, scale.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs

Newson’s Cast Glass Chairs (2017), made in the Czech Republic, are continuous symmetrical forms comprised of two hollow quarter-spheres. The boldly colored upper halves rest on clear bases, which absorb some of the reflected hues in their clouded interiors, an effect that subtly changes depending on the viewer’s vantage point.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs
When You Just Get Tired of Waiting for that Final Person to Move Out Of Your Way

Photographed in the Gagosian Gallery, Located at 522 West 21st Street, Chelsea Gallery District, NYC· The Chairs are on View in the Gallery as Part of a Larger Exhibition of Newson’s Limited-Edition Furniture and Artworks, Through February 20th, 2019.

Marc Newson Glass Chairs

Eye On Design: Presence – Absence Table By Germans Ermics

Presence - Absence Table
All Photos By Gail

Amsterdam-based designer Germans Ermics has worked extensively with frosted, ombre and colored glass in his furniture design studio. The Presence – Absence Table expands on his ideas with a design made from  hardened laminated glass mirror with graduation from 100% Mirror to 100% Red Glass. It is really quire stunning.

Presence - Absence Table

Presence – Absence was originally created in collaboration with Iskos – Berlin for the Side by Side Outside SE exhibition at the Danish Museum of Art & Design in 2017.  A statement on the table is below:

“The clearest way to perceive and define the world is through negation, through opposites:

We understand the meaning of light when it becomes dark; we first understand what our parents mean for us when they are gone; the presence of loved ones is truly grasped in their absence.

Presence and Absence walk together – Side by Side – as inseparable as day and night”

Presence - Absence Table

Photographed at The Salon Art & Design in NYC. Limited Edition of 8 Pieces, Available from Galerie Maria Wettergren, Paris.

Eye On Design: Kyoto Table By Shiro Kuramata

Kyoto Table
Photos By Gail

Born in Tokyo in 1934, Shiro Kuramata studied at the city’s polytechnic high school and Kuwsawa Design School. He revolutionized design in postwar Japan by considering the relationship between form and function, adhering to minimalist ideas but embracing surrealism as well. During the 1970s and 1980s, Kuramata began to use new technologies and industrial materials. He was inspired by Ettore Sottsass and joined the Memphis Group at its founding in 1981.

Kyoto Table Detail
Kyoto Table, Detail

The Kyoto Table (1983) is an example Kuramata’s innovative use of concrete and glass to create minimalist form with surface interest. Kuramata’s furniture and interiors have been influential both is his native country and abroad.

Photographed in the Met Breuer in NYC.

Cheers to a Wonderful 2018!

Champagne Flute
Photo By Gail

Hey Bitches, it’s been one Hell of a year, amiright? If you’re reading this, congratulations on making it out alive, and thanks for continuing to check in on the raddest pop culture blog on the interwebs! I appreciate your readership, referrals, comments, likes and shares! Let’s keep the love going in 2018! Celebrate safely tonight, and Happy New Year!

Fish Tile Mosaic at Delancey Street Subway Station

Fish Tile Mosaic
All Photos By Gail

The Delancey and Essex Street Station is home to the J, M, Z, and F Trains, and also this colorful glass mosaic mural of two fish, which appear to be swimming on the surface of the water. Fun!

Fish Tile Mosaic Close Up
Mural Detail

With minimal Googling, I discovered that the mural is called Shad Crossing, Delancey Orchard (2004) by artist Ming Fay. For the backstory, let’s go to Yelp Reviewer Tina C. from Queens, who writes:

Glass mosaics on platform and mezzanine walls symbolizes the the liveliness of the once thriving fishing marketplace in this storied Lower East Side community. Aquatic images are a metaphor for “crossing” in a glass mosaic mural on the Brooklyn-bound platform, inspired by the prominent DeLancey family’s eighteenth century farm, which stretched from the East River to the Hudson River. The farm’s cherry orchard was located where Orchard Street stands and is memorialized with radiant cherry trees on the Manhattan-bound platform.

Thank you,Tina!

Subway Sign

The larger mural is adjacent to this underground directive (above) , but on the platform for the Brooklyn Bound F, you will also find these small tile mosaic Fish Heads at random intervals along the wall.

Fish Head Tile Mosaic

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