Tag Archive | Museum of Arts and Design

Eye On Design: Acid Test Dress and Boots By Gretchen Fetchen

Acid Test Dress and Boots
All Photos By Gail

Paula Douglas, also known as Gretchen Fetchen, was one of the early participants in the San Francisco Acid Test  happenings organized by Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters in the mid-1960s. The events were designed as gatherings to promote consciousness expansion and creativity through the use of LSD, which was legal at the time.

Gretchen Fetchen’s Acid Test Dress (1965) and painted Orange Leather Boots reflects the Merry Pranksters’ rejection of norms of appearance through the embracing of exuberant Day-Glo colors. The garment also features a star, together with red, white and blue stripes — symbols of the Merry Pranksters.

Acid Test Dress and Boots Installation View

Acid Test Dress and Boots Installation View. Photographed as Part of the Counter Couture Exhibit, Up Though August 20th, 2017 at the Museum of Arts and Design in NYC

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Eye On Design: Studded Levi’s Denim Jacket By Billy Shire

Studded Levis Denim Jacket
All Photos By Gail

In 1974, Billy Shire was working on a Studded Denim Jacket to advertise his studding business, and decided to enter  it into the Levi’s Denim Art Contest. His entry, Welfare (1975), which won the competition, is embellished with eleven pounds of rivets, rhinestone rim sets and oversize upholstery tacks typically used on leather and furniture.

Studded Levis Denim Jacket Detail

It also incorporates an ashtray and a hotel desk bell, which chimes while the jacket is being worn.

Studded Levis Denim Jacket Installation View
Installation View with Jacket on Far Right

Studded Levis Denim Jacket Installation View

Shire has created stage costumes and street wear  for Elton John, as well as members of the bands Chicago and The Doobie Brothers

Theses Photographs were Taken at the Exhibit, Counter-Couture: Handmade Fashion in an American Counterculture  on Display Through August 20th, 2017 at the Museum of Arts and Design, Located at 2 Columbus Circle (at 58th Street and 8th Avenue), in NYC.

Studded Levis Denim Jacket Photo

Chris Antemann’s Forbidden Fruit at The Museum of Arts and Design

Forbidden Fruit
All Photos By Gail

If the idea of bearing witness to dozens of tiny, semi-clad porcelain figurines that appear to be on the cusp of indulging in a bacchanalian orgy floats your boat, have I a got an art exhibit for you. Chris Antemann’s Forbidden Fruit — up now at the Museum of Arts and Design — celebrates the collaboration between the Oregon-based artist and Meissen, the renowned manufacturer of fine Porcelain.

Forbidden Fruit Detail
Detail from Above Photo

In 2011, Antemann was invited to participate in Meissen’s Art Studio Program, where she worked closely with Meissen’s master artisans to create unique pieces and a series of limited editions that strike a perfect balance between her distinctive style and Meissen’s identity. These pieces are arranged in Forbidden Fruit as a grand installation that reinvents and invigorates the great figurative tradition.

Forbidden Fruit Installation View

Inspired by eighteenth-century porcelain figurines and decorative art, Antemann’s delicate and intricately detailed sculptures are lavishly presented on a central banquet table alongside a selection of stand alone sculptures and a nine-light porcelain chandelier. Her centerpiece, Love Temple (2013), is inspired by Meissen’s great historical model of Johann Joachim Kändler’s monumental Love Temple (1750). Stripping the original design back to its basic forms,  added her own figures, ornamentation, and flowers to her five-foot work, as well as a special finial with three musicians to herald the arrival of guests to the banquet of “forbidden fruit” below.

Love Temple Detail

Forbidden Fruit

Forbidden Fruit

Using the Garden of Eden as her metaphor, Antemann has created a contemporary interpretation of the eighteenth-century banqueting craze by inserting her scantily clad male and female figures.

Forbidden Fruit

Forbidden Fruit

Posed in intimate and playful vignettes of seduction, Antemann’s figures convey narratives of domesticity, social etiquette, and taboos while making formal references to classic Baroque Meissen figurines. The ceramist invents a new narrative on contemporary morality in a setting that evokes the decadence of François Boucher and Jean-Antoine Watteau.

Forbidden Fruit

Chris Antemann’s Forbidden Fruit will be on Exhibit Through February 5, 2017 at the Museum of Arts and Design, Located at 2 Columbus circle (58th Street) in NYC.

Forbidden Fruit

Forbidden Fruit

Forbidden Fruit Installation View

Crochet Coral Reef, Toxic Seas at The Museum of Arts and Design

Forrest 2 Installation View
Coral Forest, Installation View (All Photos By Gail)

Crochet Coral Reef: Toxic Seas celebrates the tenth anniversary of the Crochet Coral Reef (2005–present), an ongoing project by sisters Margaret and Christine Wertheim and their Los Angeles–based organization, the Institute For Figuring. Mixing crocheted yarn with plastic trash, the work fuses mathematics, marine biology, feminist art practices, and craft to produce large-scale coralline landscapes, both beautiful and blighted. At once figurative, collaborative, worldly, and dispersed, the Crochet Coral Reef offers a tender response to the dual calamities facing marine life: climate change and plastic trash.

Forrest 1

With 2016 being the hottest year on record, living reefs everywhere are under stress. Into these arenas of color huge areas of whiteness now intrude; bleaching events signal that corals are sick and dying. In 2005, in response to devastation of the Great Barrier Reef in their native Australia, the Wertheims began to crochet a simulation of healthy and ailing reefs.

Green and Purple Detail
Detail from the Photo Above

Using the algorithmic codes of crochet, the sisters produce crenellated forms that are representations of hyperbolic geometry, which is also manifest in the undulating structures of corals, kelps, and other reef organisms. The Wertheims and their collaborators, a core group of worldwide Crochet Reefers, fabricate an ever-evolving artificial ecology.

CCR White
Coral Reef Crocheted in Part from Plastic Dry Cleaning Bags

Orange Red Black CCR
Coral Reef Crocheted in Part from Recycled Plastic Toys

Orange Detail
Detail From the Photo Above

This exhibition consists of three main “habitats.” A giant Coral Forest and a collection of miniature Pod Worlds represent the diversity of living corals through the varying textures, colors, and forms of crocheted yarn and beads. A Bleached Reef and a brand new Toxic Reef serve as invocations of dying corals, while The Midden—four years’ worth of the Wertheims’ own domestic plastic trash—constitutes a deeply personal response to the issue of plastic waste in the oceans, including human-made phenomena such as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

Branched Anemonie Garden
Branched Anemone Garden

Installation View
Toxic Reef and Bleached Reef, Installation View

Often called the Rainforests of the Sea, coral reefs are some of the most biodiverse and productive ecosystems on Earth. They occupy less that a tenth of one percent of the world’s ocean area, yet are home to at least a quarter of all marine species. Reefs are vulnerable to many threats, such as destructive fishing techniques, pollution and tourism, as well as the global effects of climate change. The burning of fossil fuels and the raising of livestock are two of the major contributors to an increasing level of atmospheric carbon dioxide, which ultimately leads to the acidifcation and warming of ocean waters.

Bleached Reef
Bleached Reef, Detail

When reefs are stressed, a phenomenon known as “Bleaching” may occur. Photosynthetic algae —  which live symbiotically within coral colonies — leave, thus depriving corals of both their color and a major food source. The Bleached Reef seen here is a crochet invocation of such ailing corals, reflected in the contrast between the still saturated red and pink areas and the soft white yearn of bleached portions.

Pod World Plastic Fantastic Too
Pod World — Plastic Fantastic Too

Pod World Beaded Baroque
Pod World — Beaded Baroque

Pod World Red and White
Pod World — Red and White

The Midden
The Midden

In 2006, Margaret and Christine Wertheim began to crochet household plastic into a Toxic Reef, which they have since developed into plastic and coral sculptures seen in the Coral Forest section this exhibit. The initial use of plastic, such as video and audio tape, tinsel and zip ties, in their artwork evolved into an awareness of the artists’ own plastic consumption. From 2007 to 2011 the Wereheim;s collected their domestic plastic trash, includign bottoles, take out containers, and disposable shopping bags.

The Midden Detail

The Midden, Detail

The Midden, seen suspended in a fishing net from the ceiling of the exhibit’s front gallery, is a record of the family’s personal waste, with a stunning visual realization of the disposability of contemporary consumption. The work was inspired by the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a vast area located in the northern Pacific Ocean near Hawaii, where millions of tons of plastic trash accumulates in a giant ocean gyre. Other such gyres dot the globe, ad these ghastly legacies human consumption are having detrimental effects on biological, ecological and economic systems.

CCR

Crochet Coral Reef: Toxic Seas is an important exhibit that is appropriate for the entire family. Not only will you see many beautiful crocheted sculptures, but you will learn something, while having your eyes opened to serious ecological issues that require our involvement and action right now.

Crochet Coral Reef Signage

Crochet Coral Reef: Toxic Seas By Margaret and Christine Wertheim and the Institute For Figuring will be on Exhibit Through January 22, 2017 at the Museum of Art and Design Located at 2 Columbus Cicle (59th Street at 8th Avenue) in NYC. This Exhibit represents a unique presentation of the Crochet Coral Reef that focuses on climate change and ocean health, is curated by Assistant Curator Samantha De Tillio for the Museum of Arts and Design.

Installation View

Goblet Collection at the Museum of Arts and Design

Three Blue Goblets
All Photos By Gail

If you happen to pay a visit to the Museum of Arts and Design, be sure to take the stairs to travel between floors, because it is in the stairwell that you will find the museum’s stunning goblet collection.

Full Goblet Display

MAD’s collection of goblets reveals the diversity of approaches taken by artists and designers to create this common vessel. The goblets range from those inspired by historic Venetian masterworks to mass produced pieces, to non-functional works by artists who make reference to the basic form.

Zipper Goblet

There are advantages and disadvantages to having the goblets right up against the glass window, in that the natural light and transparency create favorable display conditions, but it’s challenging to get photos that don’t have, say,  a crosstown bus, or the facade of the CVS Drug Store across the street in the background. First World Problems.

Four Goblets

Open 24 Hours!

Deco Goblets

The center goblet, above, appears to pay homage to Bee Keeping. Nice.

Spiny Goblet

The orange, spiny goblet reminds me of some of the pieces in This Post.

Red Double Goblet

I love that this one has a collection of tiny goblets inside the cup!

The Museum of Arts and Design is Located at 2 Columbus Circle in NYC.

Yes, It Exists: Kenny Scharf Mannequin

Kenny Scharf Mannequin
Kenny Scharf’s Swirley, 2000 (All Photos By Gail)

Do you like Kenny Scharf? I sure do. I’ve seen his fun artwork everywhere in the city — from huge murals and sculptures to paintings and toys, cars and golf carts and even…mannequins! Scharf ‘s Swirley mannequin is part of the Ralph Pucci: The Art of The Mannequin exhibit, which is up through October 25th at the Museum of Arts and Design in Columbus Circle.

Swirley and Friends

Here she is with some of her friends!

Scharf Mannequin Heads

Scharf actually designed many different mannequins in his career, and you can also see some of their heads at the exhibit, which I recommend you check out before it is too late!

Surface Tension Bubbles Lamp By Front

Four Bubbles
All Photos By Gail

Swedish design firm Front’s Surface Tension Lamp (2014) was the result of a collaboration with the Dutch design firm Booo. Asked to create a light that used LED technology, the group took a counter-intuitive approach.

Three Bubbles Long Shot

LED bulbs last an extremely long time, so [they wondered] could the lampshade itself be temporary? Front came up with a perfect symbol of ephemerality: the bursting soap bubble

Three Bubbles Different Angle

The three members of Front, Sofia Lagerkvist, Charlotte von der Lancken and Anna Lindgren met while studying industrial design at Konstfack, Stockholm’s leading art school. As a trio of women, they have attracted attention in an industrial design world still overwhelmingly populated by men, but they do not feel that gender is necessarily a part of their work’s content.

Two Bubbles
Three Bubbles

On display at the Museum of Arts and Design in Columbus Circle, Manhattan, the Surface Tension Lamp produces bubbles intermittently throughout the day.

Fallen Bubbles