Category Archives: Arts and Culture

Modern Art Monday Presents: Hans Hofmann, Deep Within The Ravine

deep within the ravine phot by gail worley
Photo By Gail

In his writing, teaching, and powerful abstract works, Hans Hofmann advocated for what he called the dynamic “push and pull” of color, light, and shape as the best means for achieving a sense of space, movement, and emotion in painting. Filled with bold strokes the in some cases join to form larger, irregular blocks of color, Deep Within the Ravine (1965) features a pool of deep blue-black that appears compressed by passages of green and orange around it. Exhibiting Hofmann’s interest in complementary hues (blue / orange and green / red) for their inherent contrast, the painting is part of The Renate Series, a group of nine compositions he created as a tribute to his wife in 1965.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Space Girl By Mike Raz

space girl yellow 1 by mike raz photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Why is it that when artists depict lady astronauts they are always wearing a full face of make up, I ask yez. Is it to let the viewer know that the character is merely a work of fiction and could never exist in real life? Am I thinking about this too hard? Probably.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: KAWS, Companion (Resting Place)

kaws companion resting place photo by gail worley
All Photos By Gail

Provocatively half dissected, flayed, and rendered in a sophisticated grey-scale palette, Companion (Resting Place, 2013) monumentalizes the beloved character created by Brian Donnelly, one of the most popular artists of his generation, who goes by the pseudonym KAWS.

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Must See Exhibit: Andy Warhol Prints at the National Arts Club

Do you like Andy Warhol? I sure do. He is by far my favorite artist (living or dead) and it always seems like, even when I think I have seen all of his works, there is something new to discover.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Spring in Central Park By William Zorach

spring in central park photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Best known for his later work as a sculptor, William Zorach spent two years studying painting in Paris, returning to New York in 1912. He wrote that his depictions of NYC’s most famous park in Spring in Central Park (1914) were “painted at home from the imagination . . . in all wild colors, peopled with exotic nudes,“ but the bold hues in undulating outlines recall the work of the Fauves, notably Henri Matisse and Andre Derain, whose canvases he had seen in Paris. With his wife, Marguerite, an avant-garde painter herself, Zorach associated with many of America’s earliest Modernists in New York in the late 1910s, including Max Weber, Marsden Hartley, and John Maren. In 1913 both Zorachs exhibited at the prestigious international exhibition of modern art,  known as the Armory Show.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Pink Thing of The Day: Pink Cockle Shell Artwork By Tony Feher

pink shells by tony feher photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

These Pink-Painted Cockle Shells, carefully placed and adhered to a pink board is a work by artist Tony Feher (19562016). I first saw the piece from the side as I entered the gallery from another room and was intrigued by how much the shells looked like the suckers of a octopus (see detail photo, below)!  It may look like a ‘kid could do this,’ but consider the thought behind it in the scope of the artist’s oeuvre. The work is actually part of a series entitled It Didn’t Turn Out The Way I Expected from 2016.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Tomma Abts, Kobo

tomma abts kobo photo by gail worley
Photo By Gail

Tomma Abts (German, b 1967) produces her paintings following a strict, self-imposed procedure. For almost twenty years, she has used vertical canvases measuring precisely 48 by 38 centimeters (19 by 15 inches) for her paintings. Rather than begin with a preconceived structure in mind, she allows her abstract compositions to take shape as she works, sometimes over the course of several years. She paints with the support cradled in her arm, not on an easel.  As seen here, the surfaces of Abts’ canvases are composed of many layers of paint, with the ghosts of past compositions just barely visible underneath subsequent coats of acrylic and oil.  This work’s title, Kobo (1999) is pulled, like all of her titles, from an encyclopedia of German surnames.

Photographed in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.