Tag Archives: chessboard

Modern Art Monday Presents: Antonieta Sosa, Visual Chess

Visual Chess
Photo By Gail

For Venezuelan artist Antonieta Sosa, Ajedrez Visual(Visual Chess), 1965, was “like my spinal column or my umbilical cord, uniting me to painting.” Scattered pops of color interrupt the regularity of the black grid, animating it with the playful movement suggested by the work’s title.

At times, these contrasting hues prompt an optical flickering or afterimage. To Sosa, such retinal effects underscore vision as a dynamic physiological process. Thus, Visual Chess foreshadows her eventual decisions to “come down from the wall” to engage with real space and bodies in the form of sculpture, performance and installations.

Photographed in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC.

4 Tips For Having Fun at Home

fun at home tent
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Whether you are trying to scale back your expenses, simplify your lifestyle, or make the most of your property, it is likely that you are spending a lot of your time at home. This shouldn’t feel like a compromise. Instead, it should feel like a fabulous opportunity to try out new experiences, have fun with your loved ones, and embrace a positive mindset. If you are struggling to see the joys in spending your time at home, you will need to work your way through the following four tips. They will help you to get the most out of your living space and will save you from looking back in regret.

Couple Vaping
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Try Something New

The first tip is to experience something new, such as the joys of vaping. This is a fun, easy, and cost-effective way for you to spend some quality time at home. Even if you have never vaped before, it shouldn’t take you too long to find your feet. All you need to do is visit Mt Baker Vapor. This online store is the perfect place for you to purchase the vaping equipment you require. You will also have the chance to choose from a wide range of flavors that are sure to spice up your experience.

Home Theater
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Set Up a Home Cinema

The next tip is to set up a home cinema. Have no fear, this doesn’t have to involve a lengthy renovation project. In fact, you can switch up your living space in under an hour. First, you will need to tidy up your home, so that it is free from chaos and clutter. Then, you will need to organize your DVDs, so that they are easily accessible. Next, you will need to move around your seating, your lights, and your technology, so that you have the perfect view. Finally, you will need to plug in a speaker system, as this will ensure your audio is impeccable.

Backyard Chessboard

Play Games in Your Backyard

Another great tip is to play games in your backyard. There are no age restrictions on having fun, so you can do this long after your kids have gone to bed. From Giant Chess to Capture the Flag, there are so many options for you to choose from. Why not write down all of the suggestions and place them in a bowl? Then, you can carry out a lucky dip to find out what your next activity is going to be. This will add an element of surprise to your time at home and will give you something to get excited about!

Giant Chess
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Set Up a Craft Area

The final tip is to set up a craft area in your home. This is a brilliant way for you to take your hobbies to the next level. It could be that you enjoy baking, or it might be that you dabble in origami. Either way, it makes sense for your crafts to have a space of their own. Perhaps there is a spare bedroom that you could transform. Or, maybe you have a nook that is just big enough for a small desk, a fold-out table, or a storage unit.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Crucifixion (Corpus Hypercubus) By Salvador Dali

Crucifixion by Dali
Photo By Gail

Salvador Dalí utilized his theory of “nuclear mysticism,” a fusion of Catholicism, mathematics, and science, to create this unusual interpretation of Christ’s crucifixion. Levitating before a hypercube — a geometric, multidimensional form — Christ’s body is healthy, athletic, and bears no signs of torture; the crown of thorns and nails are missing.

The artist’s wife, Gala, poses as a devotional figure, witnessing Christ’s spiritual triumph over corporeal harm. Several dreamlike elements from Dali’s earlier Surrealist work feature in this painting: a levitating figure, vast barren landscape, and a chessboard.

Painted in 1954, Crucifixion (Corpus Hypercubus) By Salvador Dali is part of the permanent collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Stephanie Lempert’s Reconstructed Reliquaries at Claire Oliver Gallery

Even if you’re a jaded art scenester who thinks he’s seen every kind of art on the planet, I’d venture a guess that you’ve not seen anything like the sculptures of Stephanie Lempert that make up Reconstructed Reliquaries; the latest exhibit at Claire Oliver Gallery in Chelsea. For Reconstructed Reliquaries, Lempert interviewed close to 100 people from all walks of life, exploring the rationale behind the reasons certain memories stay with us and why we form attachments to particular objects. Lempert has created a truly unique way to explore the intertwined nature of cherished mementos and the childhood reminiscences that make them precious. The Artist consolidates the narratives held in the memory of the storytellers and connects them to a single inanimate object that they hold dear. Known primarily as a photographer and video artist, Lempert takes the next logical step in her studio practice by incorporating three-dimensional works to consolidate her concepts.

The artist realized the sculptures for Reconstructed Reliquaries by adding on thin layer by thin layer of nylon-based plastic, creating a work of art that is only recently technologically possible. Using a three-dimensional stereoscopic printing process, Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), Lempert uses the actual handwriting of the storytellers to create the sculpture itself; the subjects’ own words make their memories tangible objects. Infusing these icons with human emotions, Lempert weaves stories, literally and figuratively reconstructing memories in such a way as to create a repository for the next generation’s hopes and dreams; the sculpture she has created becomes the touchstones of the very words they embrace.

Reconstructed Reliquaries consists of fifteen sculptures including a kitchen knife, a birdcage, chess board, globe and a plush bunny, among others. The full scale chess board tells the story of a man who, as a little boy, spent summers with his beloved grandfather. The grandfather taught him to play chess and, year by year, the boy grew in his abilities until the day he could beat his grandfather at the game. It was a very proud day for both of them. Another sculpture, a size 8 stiletto pump, tells the story of a little girl looking up at her beautiful mother getting ready to go out to a party. The child could not wait for the day that she herself would be allowed to wear such amazing shoes; they would make her graceful, sexy, statuesque and so powerful.

I imagine anyone would have a very personal experience looking at these beautiful objects and wondering about the life of the person whose words and memories helped to create them. Do make a point to see Reconstructed Reliquaries before it closes on May 7, 2011.

Claire Oliver Gallery is Located at 513 West 26th Street, New York City. Hours are Tuesday-Saturday 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM.