Tag Archive | Optical Illusion

Julian Stanczak, The Life of The Surface, Paintings 1970 – 1975 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash

Filtration- Opposing to Red
Filtration – Opposing to Red (All Photos By Gail)

We were very sad to learn of the passing of groundbreaking painter and Op Art pioneer, Julian Stanczak on March 25th of this year. He had good, long life! As a last hurrah, Mitchell-Innes & Nash is currently hosting The Life of the Surface, Paintings, 1970 – 1975, an exhibition of Stanczak’s paintings exclusively from the years 1970 to 1975. This long-planned exhibition is Mitchell-Innes & Nash’s second solo exhibition with the artist, and the first since his recent passing.

Red + Red
Red + Red

Red + Red Detail
Red + Red, Detail

Stanczak’s reverence for color comes from a desire to translate the drama and power of nature into a universal impression. His canvases are created through a complex process of tape masks upon which colors are systematically added and unveiled in layers. Despite the intricate and painstaking process, Stanczak does not use any preparatory drawings for his paintings, relying solely on his own vision of a finished work.

Installation View
Installation View

Column Painting
Detail
Detail from Above Painting

The artist’s work transcends traditional nods to analytical painting methods often associated with this period by drawing upon personal experiences, particularly the diverse places he has lived. Utilizing tromp l’oeil characteristics, Stanczak’s paintings engender the vibration of a distinct visual experience from within the surface of the canvas.

 Yellow and Orange Triangles

Red to Black

In works like Filtration- Opposing to Red (1974-77) the color radiates from the center, vibrating across the surface of the canvas. The light oscillates and encompasses the viewer, creating an engaging and thoughtful experience with color. While the intensity is similar, the cool tones of Soft Light (1972-73) resonate at a gradual pace and generate a calmer energy. The artist described his titles as “provocative of the experience that parallels [his] initial response,” rather than direct descriptions.

Diatonic
Diatonic

Diatonic Detail
Diatonic, Detail

Julian Stanczak’s body of work is awe-inspiring and unique. Whether you’re already a fan, or if you’ve never seen his work in person, now is the time to check him out.

Lime Green

Left Status Blue Right Five Verticals

Julian Stanczak’s  The Life of The Surface, Paintings 1970 – 1975 will be on Exhibit Through June 24th, 2017 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Located at 534 West 26th Street in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Pink and Aqua

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Cocktail Cabinet Design Mimics Classic David Bowie Stage Costume

Bowie and the Cabinet

David Bowie from the Aladdin Sane tour, 1973. Photographed by Masatoshi Sukita. Zelouf+Bell’s Stones in a Pond Cocktail Cabinet Optical illusion. Photo by Roland Paschhoff. (All Post Photos By Gail)

ZELOUF+BELL’s new season Stones in a Pond Cocktail Cabinet is the third in their cocktail cabinet series with a signature motif; its doors inlaid with patinated solid brass in an optical pattern inspired by the ripple-effect of stones dropped into a pond.

Stones in a Pond Cocktail Cabinet

Patinated hinges allow the glistening doors to completely fold back to reveal an ivory ripple sycamore interior, shagreen work surface and leather-lined drawers with handmade ivory figured sycamore pulls.

Stones in a Pond Cocktail Cabinet Interiors

The top of the cabinet’s oil-filled rotary damper allows it to fall slowly, closed. The cabinet sits on a patinated brass base. Created in a limited edition of 6, plus 1 AP. Visit This Link for more information.

Zelouf + Bell Signage

Photographed at the Architectural Digest Design Show at Pier 94, NYC, March 2016.

Must See Art: Julian Stanczak’s From Life at Mitchell-Innes & Nash

Julian Stanczak Four Panels
All Photos By Gail

I don’t think I could count the number of times I overheard someone mention how much the paintings of Julian Stanczak reminded them of Op Art pioneer Bridget Riley while we cruised around the opening reception for From Life, Stanczak’s new exhibit over at Mitchell-Innes & Nash. Trust me: it was a lot – and I was thinking the same thing.

Julian Stanczak Red Bars

But a little research on my part revealed that the term Op Art actually first appeared in print in Time Magazine in October 1964 in response to Stanczak’s Optical Paintings exhibit at the Martha Jackson gallery. Crazy!

Julian Stanczak Orange and Yellow

Now at age 86, Julian Stanczak – a former student of Joseph Albers, whose early life was marked by enormous personal struggle – serves as a true artistic and personal inspiration with his first solo exhibition at M-I & N, which includes a dozen large-scale paintings spanning the artist’s career from the 1960s to the present and includes works not seen publically in decades.

Julian Stanczak Blue and Red Squares

Stanczak’s canvases are created through a complex process of tape masks in which colors are systematically added and unveiled in layers. While incredibly methodical, Stanczak works alone on his canvases without the aid of preliminary sketches, relying solely on his own vision of a finished work.

Julian Stanczak Black Grid

A Detail from the Above Painting is Below.

Julian Stanczak Detail

This is even more impressive when you know that Stanczak lost the complete use his of right arm after confinement in a Siberian hard labor camp during World War II.

Additional 1980
Additional (1980)

Arist in front of Additional
Julian Stanczak, Photographed in front of Additional, at the Show’s Opening Reception on October 30th.

The artist makes the surface plane of the painting vibrate through his use of lines and contrasting colors, but what I want to really emphasize is how these paintings look completely different to the naked eye than they do when seen through the lens of a camera. The observable transformation is really quite remarkable.

Julian Stanczak Black Test Pattern

In fact, it would not be an exaggeration to say that these paintings are mind-blowing.

Julian Stanczak

Very highly recommended!

Julian Stanczak’s From Life will be on Exhibit Through December 6th, 2014 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Located at 534 West 26th Street, in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Quatorial 1978
Quatorial 1978

From Life Signage

Modern Art Monday Presents: Marcel Duchamp’s Rotary Demisphere (Precision Optics)

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Rotary Demisphere
Photo By Gail

Created in 1925, Marcel Duchamp’s Rotary Demisphere (Precision Optics) is a kinetic sculpture that turns itself on at random intervals. Back in Paris after World War I, Duchamp experimented with machines that produced optical effects — work he had begun in New York. When this machine is set in motion, the circles appear to pulsate toward the viewer. The copper ring around the dome’s circumference is engraved with French words chosen for the way their sounds echo one another: Rrose Selavy et moi esquivons les ecchymoses des esquimaux aux mots exquis (Rrose Selavy and I dodge the Eskimos’s bruises with exquisite words).

Rotary Demisphere is part of the Permanent Collection at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC. Find it in the Painting and Sculpture Galleries.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Bridget Riley Blaze I

Bridget Riley Blaze 1
Bridget Riley, Blaze 1, 1962 (Photo By Gail)

While at Goldsmith’s College in London, Bridget Riley (born 1931) became interested in the optical vibrations initiated by Georges Seurat’s Pointillist technique of the 1880s. By 1961, Riley was painting solely in Black and White, and her paintings of the early 1960s are pioneering examples of what came to be known as Op Art.

With Blaze 1 (1962), Riley applied black zigzag stripes of emulsion to a white ground to create a pattern that assaults the eye: the bands of paint create a corkscrew–like optical effect wherein the two-dimensional painting appears to both recede into the wall and to project itself into space in front of the picture plane.

Bridget Riley’s Blaze 1 is part of the permanent collection in the Modern Art wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Patrick Hughes Presents Studiolospective at Flowers Gallery

Patrick Hughes and Geoffrey
Artist Patrick Hughes and Art Blogger Geoffrey Dicker Pose in front of Hughes’ Work, A Study of the Studiolo (All Photos By Gail)

The Wow Factor is off-the-charts at British Surrealist Patrick Hughes‘ new exhibit, Studiolospective up now at Flowers Gallery. They also have fresh flowers delivered from Clear Lake florist.

“My pictures seem to move as you move,” Hughes explains in his artist’s statement. “They come to life when we bring them to life. This is because they are made in perspective the wrong way round, in reverspective. If you bob down in front of them, it is as if you have gone up, and as you walk past to the right it is as if you have gone to the left. I am delighted to bring together paintings for this exhibition, which move between the centuries.”

We had no idea what to expect when we walked into the gallery, but it was immediately clear when moving even slightly from a straight ahead view to a side perspective of any of the works in this exhibit that these are 3D paintings the likes of which I had never seen.

New  York Flowers Front View
New York Flowers

The above painting, named after the gallery and depicting works by other artists represented by Flowers, is shown here from its head-on perspective.

New New York Flowers Perspective

When you move to the right, you see more of a perspective from the left.

New New York Flowers with Minotaur

And what the hell is this thing? Kudos to Hughes for giving me nightmares of a Minotaur stalking me in a deserted art gallery!

Pop Art Gallery
Pop Up

The above painting is called Pop Up, and depicts an art gallery full of Contemporary Pop Art including well-known works by Warhol, Lichtenstein and Oldenburg.

Pop Art Gallery Perspective

In this photo you can see how the painting is constructed in 3D and actually extends outward from the canvas. Trippy! See a video of how this painting looks as you move from left to right in front of it it at This Link.

Pop Art Gallery Close Up

The painting in the center of the above photo (on a green field) is a replication of an original work by Hughes, featuring Allsorts, a Licorice candy fr0m England. I know this because Hughes just happened to be hanging out in the gallery when we were there and he was happy to answer our questions  and also signed cards for us and posed for some nice photos. What a super nice and extremely talented man he is!

Happy Endings
Happy Endings

Side View of Painting

A shot of this Painting from the side will will give an idea of how Hughes’ works are constructed.

The centerpiece of the exhibition is the three-dimensional reverse perspective, A Study Of The Studiolo, seen in the first photo in this post. In 15th century Italy, a studiolo, (little studio) was a small, often extravagantly decorated room reserved for studying, writing and reading – all correlations with Hughes himself, who is an avid academic. Hughes based his painting on the studiolo of Federico, the Duke of Montefeltro, who commissioned his marquetry studioli in Gubbio and Urbino in about 1480 (Hughes has visited both studioli several times). The Urbino Studiolo in Italy still exists in-situ, while the Gubbio Studiolo was re-installed in its own room in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1996. Hughes urged both Geoffrey and I to check out the Studiolo recreation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where it is located on the main floor just adjacent to the gift shop. I don’t know how I’ve never managed to see it after literally decades of visiting The Met, but I will be checking it out on my next trip.

Studiolospective is one of the coolest exhibits in town right now. Be sure to pop into Flowers Gallery before the show closes in just over a month.

Robert Indiana Love
Love All

Robert Indiana Love
Love All Perspective

Studiolospective by Patrick Hughes will be on Exhibit Through June 7th, 2014 at Flowers Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street, NYC in the Chelsea Gallery District.

Patrick Hughes Studiolospective Signage