Tag Archive | Salvador Dali

Eye On Design: Bocca Sofa

Bocca Sofa
Photos By Gail

The iconic Bocca Sofa (also unofficially known an the Lips Sofa) was created by the radical Italian design team Studio 65 for the famed Italian manufacturers Gufram back in 1972. Based on an original design by none other than Surrealist Salvador Dali, who took Mae West as his inspiration, Studio 65 looked to that other iconic beauty, Marilyn Monroe, to create this famous sofa. Both Studio 65 and Gufram are known for being places where the art world and design world collided, and their kaleidoscopic fusion of pop art, conceptual art and modernist design reached their zenith with this piece.

The voluptuous Bocca Sofa has gone down as a design classic, the perfect blend of playfulness and serious design. It goes without saying that it’s a statement piece, as this sofa would dominate the design scheme of any living room. At a sizable 83 inches in width, the Bocca will comfortably seat three and, despite its artsy background, it retains excellent functionality, being both extremely comfortable and coated with easy to clean polyurethane, while an inner frame of chromium plated steel lends solidity and quality. A guaranteed conversation starter, this is a sofa that expresses a bold personality through its design. (Source)

Bocca Sofa

Photographed at R & Company, Located at 64 White Street, NYC.

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Modern Art Monday Presents: Rene Magritte, On The Threshold of Liberty

Rene Magritte On The Threshold of Liberty
Photo By Gail

One of Surrealism’s most important patrons, Edward James, was a willing collaborator whose sense of play initiated commissions for his homes from such artists as Salvador Dali and Leonora Carrington. James was impressed with the work of Rene Magritte, which was displayed in the 1936 International Surrealist Exhibition in London, so he invited the artist to paint three decorative canvases for the ballroom of his London home. Magritte painted On The Threshold of Liberty during his stay there in 1937, as the centerpiece of the three works. Originally set behind two-way mirrors, the works would become visible when James changed the lighting, provoking what he called “a profound sensation.”

Photographed in the Art Institute, Chicago.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Crucifixion (Corpus Hypercubus) By Salvador Dali

Crucifixion by Dali
Photo By Gail

Salvador Dalí utilized his theory of “nuclear mysticism,” a fusion of Catholicism, mathematics, and science, to create this unusual interpretation of Christ’s crucifixion. Levitating before a hypercube — a geometric, multidimensional form — Christ’s body is healthy, athletic, and bears no signs of torture; the crown of thorns and nails are missing.

The artist’s wife, Gala, poses as a devotional figure, witnessing Christ’s spiritual triumph over corporeal harm. Several dreamlike elements from Dali’s earlier Surrealist work feature in this painting: a levitating figure, vast barren landscape, and a chessboard.

Painted in 1954, Crucifixion (Corpus Hypercubus) By Salvador Dali is part of the permanent collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Yves Tanguy, The Satin Tuning Fork

The Satin Tuning Fork
Photo By Gail

Elastic Shapes with Dali-esque shadows litter Tanguy’s landscape, like the paradoxical meeting of unrelated materials in the painting’s title. According to the poet, John Ashbery, the self-taught artist chose titles arbitrarily, sometimes asking friends for suggestions.

Painted in 1940, The Satin Tuning Fork is part of the permanent collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Salvador Dali, The Accommodations of Desire

Salvador Dail The Accommodations of Desire
Photo By Gail (Click Image to Enlarge for Detail)

Painted in the summer of 1929, The Accommodations of Desire is a small gem that deals with the twenty-five-year-old Dalí’s sexual anxieties over a love affair with an older, married woman. The woman, Gala, then the wife of Surrealist poet Paul Éluard, became Dalí’s lifelong muse and mate. In this picture, which Dalí painted after taking a walk alone with Gala, he included seven enlarged pebbles on which he envisioned what lay ahead for him: “terrorizing” lions’ heads (not so “accommodating” to his “desire” as the title of the painting facetiously suggests), as well as a toupee, various vessels (one in the shape of a woman’s head), three figures embracing on a platform, and a colony of ants (a symbol of decay).

Dalí did not paint the lions’ heads but, rather, cut them out from what must have been an illustrated children’s book, slyly matching the latter’s detailed style with his own. These collaged elements are virtually indistinguishable from the super-saturated color and painstaking realism of the rest of the composition, startling the viewer into questioning the existence of the phenomena recorded and of the representation as a whole.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Salvador Dali, The Persistence of Memory

The Persistence of Memory
Photo By Gail (Click Image to Enlarge for Detail)

Arguably one of Salvador Dali’s most well-known paintings, The Persistence of Memory (1931) is perhaps most famous for its images of melted timepieces and ants — which can be seen swarming on the face of the golden-colored stop watch in the lower left-hand side of the painting. Both of these motifs show up now and again in Dali’s signature surrealist works. The painting was given as an anonymous gift to MOMA and is part of the museum’s permanent collection.

Must See Art: Blek Le Rat’s Ignorance is Bliss

Sweet Dreams
Sweet Dreams by Blek Le Rat (All Photos By Gail)

My vote for the first Must See Show of NYC’s Fall Art Season is iconic stencil artist Blek Le Rat’s Ignorance is Bliss at Jonathan LeVine Gallery. While Saturday’s opening reception was comparatively sparsely attended, this made for a great viewing experience, perfect photo snapping conditions and a chance to talk to the artist himself, who was on hand to sign cards, pose for photos and, in general, be an all around nice, cool guy. Blek Le Rat!

Rope Pulling
Rope Pulling

Ignorance is Bliss is Le Rat’s largest body of work to date and his second solo exhibit at the Gallery.

David with Kalashnikov
David with Kalashnikov

The exhibit features a series of works on canvas as well as one bronze, marking the first time the artist has worked in sculpture. The gilded bronze piece depicts Michaelangelo’s David holding a rifle, and is based on a stencil that Blek le Rat has stenciled on the streets of cities all over the world. The sculpture also features a small rat by David’s feet (sadly, the rat is slighting obscured by David’s leg in the photo above). This iconic rat is found throughout the artist’s work, and, coincidentally, is also found repeatedly in the work of Banksy, for whom Le Rat is a direct and prominent influence.

Avida Dollars
Avida Dollars (Salvador Dali Portrait)

Spray Can
Spray Can

Ignorance is Bliss fills all rooms of the Gallery — rare for the LeVine space, which can co-exhibit work by up to three featured artists at one time.
Sibyl and Power of Ignorance
Sibyl and Power of Ignorance

The Big Race
The Big Race

Vicious
Vicious

It’s always fun to see someone re-interpret this popular shot of the late Sid Vicious by photographer Dennis Morris.

Blek Le Rat is a legend and his work has influenced everyone, so do come out and see this show while you can!

Blek Le Rat’s Ignorance is Bliss will be on Exhibit Through October 5th, 2013 at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Located at 529 West 20th Street, 9th Floor in the Chelsea Gallery District.

3 Blind Rats
3 Blind Rats

Jeff Koons Designs Mouton 2010 Wine Label

Jeff Koons Wine Label
Image Source

The fabulous Jeff Koons, one of our very favorite contemporary pop artists, is the latest in a long line of artists to create an original work for Château Mouton Rothschild, which has commissioned avant-garde artists to design its labels since 1945. In his design, pictured above, Koons works over a Pompeii fresco of The Birth of Venus with a silver line drawing of a ship sailing under a bright sun.

Among the other artists to have created a label for Mouton Rothschild are Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí, Georges Braque, Juan Miró, Andy Warhol, Francis Bacon and Lucien Freud.

Halfhearted By Robert Deyber

Half a Heart By Robert Deyber
Art By Robert Deyber, Photo By Gail

I discovered the fun and thought provoking art of surrealist painter Robert Deyber just a few days ago, while I was at the Mark Kostabi exhibit at Martin Lawrence Galleries. Martin Lawrence also represents Deyber, and their basement gallery was filled with his clever images, which are literal visual representations of familiar, popular or mundane phrases or things such as “The Buck Stops Here,” “Bad Hair Day” or “Train of Thought.” I actually had to guess at the title of the painting above — which could be “Half a Heart or “Halfhearted” — because it wasn’t listed in the gallery and I could not find it online, so feel free to correct me if you are a Deyber fan who is familiar with this awesome painting.

Watch a cool short film on Deyber and his art at This Link.