Tag Archives: whiskey

Eye On Design: Engraved Whiskey Decanter Circa 1867

engraved whiskey decanter photo by gail worley
Photos By Gail

Richly-colored blown glass in the Bohemian taste, ornamented with cutting and engraving, attracted the American public beginning in the mid-nineteenth century. This whiskey decanter (from the Boston and Sandwich Glass Company), in a shape typical of the 1860s and 1870s, is distinguished by its brilliant faceting and detailed depiction of fruit, revealing the skill of the engraver, George Franklin Lapham . As a testament to its quality, Lapham signed and dated the work.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

engraved whiskey decanter photo by gail worley

NYFW Cocktail of The Day: The Market Editor

The Market Editor

THE MARKET EDITOR

Anyone who spends half their time on an airplane searching for the newest designs always looks forward to the comforts of home. In this case it is a sparkling version of a “whiskey sour”.

2 oz quality American Bourbon (Whiskey)

1 oz freshly squeezed lemon juice

Egg white

Polar® Vanilla Seltzer

(if you need to sweeten it add a teaspoon of agave)

Vigorously shake the whiskey, lemon juice and egg white in a shaker. Once there is a bit of froth pour over ice in a double old-fashioned glass. Top generously with Polar® Seltzer.

Zombie Head Decanter

Zombie Head Decanter and Glass

Seriously, you can get wasted just looking at this thing!

Zombie Head Decanter Features!

  • Decanter shaped like a Zombie’s Head
  • Glass Vessel with Cork Stopper
  • Size (capacity): 27 oz / 800 ml
  • Measures 4″ x 7-1/2″ x 5″

Sale Priced at just $19.95, Visit This Link to purchase!

Zombie Head Beverage Decanter

Swedish Singer Loses Fight For His Right to Party

Booze

Story courtesy of The Local Dot SE via a tip from Tracy at Modern Urban Living:

A 21-year-old singer tried to weasel his way out of Sweden’s hefty tax on imported alcohol by claiming that partying and free-flowing booze were occupational requirements for rock ‘n roll stars. “I also drink a great deal more than the average Swede. I’m a singer in a rock band and whisky is a part of it,” the man explained to the county administrative court.

According to Swedish Customs regulations, alcohol imports from other EU countries can be duty free if “the alcohol is meant for individual consumption or for your family’s needs.” But the court disagreed with the man’s arguments for why he should be given a larger allotment of tax-free alcohol imports than other Swedes.

It ruled therefore that Swedish Customs officials in Helsingborg acted correctly when they demanded the singer pay tax on the 45 litres of spirits, 60 litres of wine and 300 beers, which he wanted to bring into the country, reports the newspaper Metro.