Tag Archive | Abstract Painting

Modern Art Monday Present: Hilma af Klint, The Dove No. 1 (One of a Series)

Helma af Klimt The Dove No 1
Photo By Gail

Hilma af Klint (1862 – 1944) was a Swedish artist and mystic whose paintings were among the first abstract art. af Klint often incorporated insights gleaned from color theory in her paintings, while endowing colors with unique symbolic significances. In The Dove (1915), a group that depicts the creation of matter from light, she used a combination that reoccurs in much of her work: blue and yellow. In the artist’s symbolic vocabulary, blue represents the female, and yellow stands for the male. Though the gendering of these colors was was specific to af Klint, that belief that these two colors represent an essential dichotomy likely derived from Johannn Wolfgang von Geothe’s Theory of Colors (1810), a book found in af Klint’s library.

In Goethe’s theory, colors are made by the mixture of flight and shadow, with blue emerging from the darkness and yellow from the dulling of light; green was their harmonious union. Geothe further claimed that colors were associated with human qualities, aligning blue with baseness and gloom, and yellow with goodness. Though af Klint frequently began groups with this color pairing, the works regularly give way to a spectrum of color

Photographed in the Guggenheim Museum as Part of the Exhibit, Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future, On View Through April 23rd, 2019.

Advertisements

Modern Art Monday Presents: Eva Hesse, Untitled Abstract Painting

Untitled Abstract Painting
Photo By Gail

This Untitled Abstract Painting (circa 1963 or 64) is one of the last paintings made by Eva Hesse before she switched to sculpture. Its deconstructed symbols, figures, and shapes evoke natural forms and bodies without ever being directly identifiable. Delicate brushwork, soft colors and a light, witty touch lend this work a feminine quality that she intended as a rebuke to the masculinity of Minimalist ArtHess was reading Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex at this time, and the text led her to question her own fragmented status as artist, woman and wife. Her work, though not overtly political, explores these issues in poetic, expressive abstractions.

Photographed in the Jewish Museum in NYC.

Carmen Herrera, Lines of Sight at The Whitney Museum

Installation Sculptures 2
Installation View (All Photos By Gail)

Most of the better-known artists of the Geometric Abstraction school of art —- such as Josef Albers, Ellsworth Kelly, Kenneth Noland, and Frank Stella — are men; but that doesn’t mean there were no equally talented  women artists working alongside these giants, just because we don’t know about them.

Red Orange Yellow

One such artist is the Cuban-American painter Carmen Herrera, who, at 101 years of age, is likely the oldest working professional artist in America. Right now, you can see a collection of Herrera’s work spanning three decades at the Whitney Museum, and it is pretty sweet. Carmen Herrara: Lines of Sight is the first museum exhibition of this groundbreaking artist in New York City in nearly two decades. Focusing on the years 1948 to 1978, the period during which Herrera developed her signature style, the show features more than fifty works, including paintings, three-dimensional works, and works on paper.

Yellow and Blue

Installation View

Lines of Sight begins with the formative period following World War II, when Herrera lived in Paris and experimented with different modes of abstraction before establishing the visual language that she would explore with great nuance for the succeeding five decades. Many of these works have never been displayed before in a museum.

Pink Black and White

Black and White Green

Blanco Y Verde
Blanco Y Verde (White and Green) Installation View

The second section of the show is an unprecedented gathering of works from what Herrera considers her most important series, Blanco y Verde (1959–1971). Nine paintings from this series illustrate the highly innovative way in which Herrera conceptualized her paintings as objects, using the physical structure of the canvas as a compositional tool and integrating the surrounding environment.

Green and White

Estructuras

With work dating from approximately 1962 to 1978, the final section illuminates Herrera’s continued experimentation with figure/ground relationships and highlights the architectural underpinnings of many of her compositions. This section includes four wooden sculptures—Herrera’s “estructuras”—as well as her brilliant Days of the Week, a series of seven vivid paintings.

Estructuras

For those who can’t make it to New York to see Lines of Sight in person, you can check out a new documentary, The 100 Years Show — which celebrates Herrera’s career  chronicles her preparation for the Whitney exhibit — which is currently streaming on Netflix.

Lines of Sight Signage

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight will be on Exhibit Through January 9th, 2017, at The Whitney Museum, Located at 99 Gansevoort Street, in Manhattan.

Installation Sculptures

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Modern Art Monday Presents: Joaquin Torres-Garcia, Estructura En Color

Estructura En Color
Photo By Gail

Made at height of the heated discussions on abstraction that took place around the artists’ group Cercle et Carré (Circle and Square), which Torres–Garcia co-founded, Estructura En Color (Color Structure), 1930 is remarkable for the way it simultaneously corresponds to and since is it self from “pure” abstraction as it was conceived at the time. The structural grid of horizontal and vertical lines Torres-Garcia employs is similar to the compositional mode often practiced by Neo-Plasticists such his Piet Mondrian, but it is not nearly as “rational” as it is  in contemporaneous work by Torres-Garcia’s younger peers. By multiplying the grid’s  rectangles Torres-Garcia made a work that instead relates more closely to the stained-glass windows he designed early in his career while working at the Sagrada Familia church under architect Antoni Gaudi.  Likewise,  although blue, red, yellow, and white are signature colors of abstraction in the style of Mondrian, Torres-Garcia’s versions are voluntarily darker, earthier, and more somber. With these variations in color and form, his work boldly breaks away from the orthodoxy of modern abstraction.

 Photographed  in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Modern Art Monday Presents: Hans Hoffman, Veluti in Speculum

Hans Hoffman Veluti in Speculum
Photo By Gail

One of the most accomplished abstract painters and influential teachers of the 20th century, Hans Hofmann  (1880-1966)  shaped three generations of artists, both in Europe and the United States. These students included Joan Mitchell, Larry Rivers, Allan Kaprow, and Marisol. As a painter, Hofmann  is best remembered for his exhilarating large scale compositions that explore dynamic color and spatial relationships, topics about which he wrote widely read essays.

This work, Veluti in Speculum (1962) is from Hofmann’s  so-called Renate series, a group of paintings he made as a tribute to his wife. Executed at the height of his career, they demonstrate the full power and broad a range of Hofmann’s distinctive style, one of the leading examples of painterly abstraction.

Photographed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Holton Rower’s Pour Paintings & Focus Paintings at The Hole

Holton Rower Pour Painting 1
All Photos By Gail

The Hole Gallery on Bowery is the place to go right now to see two great exhibits under one roof. In tandem with the abstract group exhibit, Xtraction, the gallery is hosting two diverse bodies of work by painter Holton Rower that are equally impressive. Rower’s Pour Paintings, which resemble huge, abstract psychedelic targets as well as the concentric rings that appear in a bisected tree trunk, take their name from the artist’s process of pouring hand-made acrylic paints over a wood “canvas.”

Holton Rower Pour Painting Close Up

In this photo above you can see the edge detail of where the paint drips over and extends beyond the boundaries of the canvas.

Holton Rower Pour Paintings 2

The process of creating pour paintings is probably most identified with Lynda Benglis, but while the process is similar, Rower’s paintings are truly unique and have a wildly organic feel.

Holton Rower Pour Paintings 3
Holton Rower Pour Paintings 3 Close Up

Detail from Painting in Photo Above

Holton Rower’s Pour Paintings are unbelievably gorgeous and these photos can’t accurately capture their color and vibrant energy.

Holton Rower Focus Paintings Wall

In the same gallery, Rower introduces a new body of work he calls Focus Paintings that, hilariously, are created to deliberately appear out of focus. What makes these muted yet colorful paintings even more fun to ponder is the fact that the artist refuses to divulge the process through which he creates them.

Holton Rower Focus Painting

This one reminds me of an abstract representation of a photo of a galaxy. Really beautiful.

Pour Paintings: Focus Paintings By Holton Rower will be on Exhibit through June 20th, 2013 at The Hole, Located at 312 Bowery (at 2nd Street), NYC. Visit The Hole NYC for Gallery Hours and More Information.

Gerhard Richter’s Abstraktes Bild (Faust)

Gerhard Richter Abstraktes Bild (Faust) 1980
Photos By Gail

The title of this monumental abstract painting by German visual artist Gerhard Richter translates to Abstract Painting (Faust) (1980). Clever! Oil on canvas in three cections, it was photographed by me with great stealth in a Super Secret Location!

Gerhard Richter at DB